attitude to death

Summary

Summary: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.

Top Publications

  1. ncbi "It was haunting...": physicians' descriptions of emotionally powerful patient deaths
    Vicki A Jackson
    Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Founders 600, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Acad Med 80:648-56. 2005
  2. pmc Factors influencing death at home in terminally ill patients with cancer: systematic review
    Barbara Gomes
    The Cicely Saunders Foundation Department of Palliative Care, Policy, and Rehabilitation, King s College London, London SE5 9RJ
    BMJ 332:515-21. 2006
  3. ncbi Where people die (1974--2030): past trends, future projections and implications for care
    Barbara Gomes
    Cicely Saunders International Department of Palliative Care, Policy and Rehabilitation, King s College London, London, UK
    Palliat Med 22:33-41. 2008
  4. ncbi Factors considered important at the end of life by patients, family, physicians, and other care providers
    K E Steinhauser
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center 152, 508 Fulton St, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    JAMA 284:2476-82. 2000
  5. ncbi Methodological review: measured and reported congruence between preferred and actual place of death
    C L Bell
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, John A Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA
    Palliat Med 23:482-90. 2009
  6. pmc Care of the dying patient: the last hours or days of life
    John Ellershaw
    Marie Curie Centre Liverpool, Speke Road, Liverpool L25 8QA
    BMJ 326:30-4. 2003
  7. pmc Exposure to death is associated with positive attitudes and higher knowledge about end-of-life care in graduating medical students
    Wendy G Anderson
    Division of Hospital Medicine and Palliative Care Program, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California P60 MD000239, USA
    J Palliat Med 11:1227-33. 2008
  8. ncbi Desire for hastened death in patients with advanced disease and the evidence base of clinical guidelines: a systematic review
    Peter L Hudson
    Centre for Palliative Care, St Vincent s Hospital and The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Austalia
    Palliat Med 20:693-701. 2006
  9. ncbi Changing attitudes towards euthanasia among medical students in Austria
    Willibald J Stronegger
    Institute of Social Medicine and Epidemiology, Medical University of Graz, Universitätsstrasse 6 I, A 8010 Graz, Austria
    J Med Ethics 37:227-9. 2011
  10. ncbi Review: the quality of dying and death: a systematic review of measures
    Sarah Hales
    Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada
    Palliat Med 24:127-44. 2010

Detail Information

Publications259 found, 100 shown here

  1. ncbi "It was haunting...": physicians' descriptions of emotionally powerful patient deaths
    Vicki A Jackson
    Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Founders 600, Boston, MA 02114, USA
    Acad Med 80:648-56. 2005
    ..To understand the emotional experiences of physicians who care for dying patients and to identify educational opportunities for improving patient care and physician well-being...
  2. pmc Factors influencing death at home in terminally ill patients with cancer: systematic review
    Barbara Gomes
    The Cicely Saunders Foundation Department of Palliative Care, Policy, and Rehabilitation, King s College London, London SE5 9RJ
    BMJ 332:515-21. 2006
    ..To determine the relative influence of different factors on place of death in patients with cancer...
  3. ncbi Where people die (1974--2030): past trends, future projections and implications for care
    Barbara Gomes
    Cicely Saunders International Department of Palliative Care, Policy and Rehabilitation, King s College London, London, UK
    Palliat Med 22:33-41. 2008
    ..We analysed past trends in place of death (1974-2003) and projected likely trends to 2030 in England and Wales and from these need for care...
  4. ncbi Factors considered important at the end of life by patients, family, physicians, and other care providers
    K E Steinhauser
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center 152, 508 Fulton St, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    JAMA 284:2476-82. 2000
    ..Empirical evidence defining such factors, however, is lacking...
  5. ncbi Methodological review: measured and reported congruence between preferred and actual place of death
    C L Bell
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, John A Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA
    Palliat Med 23:482-90. 2009
    ..Cross-study comparison would be enhanced by the use of similar questions to elicit preference, tables of preferred versus actual places of death, and kappa statistics of agreement...
  6. pmc Care of the dying patient: the last hours or days of life
    John Ellershaw
    Marie Curie Centre Liverpool, Speke Road, Liverpool L25 8QA
    BMJ 326:30-4. 2003
  7. pmc Exposure to death is associated with positive attitudes and higher knowledge about end-of-life care in graduating medical students
    Wendy G Anderson
    Division of Hospital Medicine and Palliative Care Program, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California P60 MD000239, USA
    J Palliat Med 11:1227-33. 2008
    ..To examine the relationship between exposure to death and attitudes and knowledge about end-of-life care in graduating medical students...
  8. ncbi Desire for hastened death in patients with advanced disease and the evidence base of clinical guidelines: a systematic review
    Peter L Hudson
    Centre for Palliative Care, St Vincent s Hospital and The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Austalia
    Palliat Med 20:693-701. 2006
    ..Not many research studies seem to have specifically targeted why palliative care patients may desire hastened death, and few have focused on clinical guidelines for responding to such requests...
  9. ncbi Changing attitudes towards euthanasia among medical students in Austria
    Willibald J Stronegger
    Institute of Social Medicine and Epidemiology, Medical University of Graz, Universitätsstrasse 6 I, A 8010 Graz, Austria
    J Med Ethics 37:227-9. 2011
    ..Therefore, it is interesting to know which trends in attitudes prevail among the physicians of the future...
  10. ncbi Review: the quality of dying and death: a systematic review of measures
    Sarah Hales
    Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada
    Palliat Med 24:127-44. 2010
    ..Strategies to measure the quality of dying and death are becoming increasingly rigorous. Further research is required to understand the factors influencing the ratings of the quality of dying and death...
  11. ncbi Patterns of dying: palliative care for non-malignant disease
    F E M Murtagh
    Palliative Care Team, King s College Hospital, London
    Clin Med 4:39-44. 2004
    ..This paper focuses on palliative care for those with such diagnoses by describing variations in illness trajectory according to diagnosis, and exploring how this may affect provision of palliative care...
  12. ncbi Preferences for place of care and place of death among informal caregivers of the terminally ill
    Kevin Brazil
    Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
    Palliat Med 19:492-9. 2005
    ....
  13. ncbi A measure of the quality of dying and death. Initial validation using after-death interviews with family members
    J Randall Curtis
    Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98104, USA
    J Pain Symptom Manage 24:17-31. 2002
    ..Future work will assess the potential role of the QODD in improving the quality of the dying experience...
  14. ncbi Third-year medical students' experiences with dying patients during the internal medicine clerkship: a qualitative study of the informal curriculum
    Neda Ratanawongsa
    University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, USA
    Acad Med 80:641-7. 2005
    ..To explore third-year medical students' experiences with death and dying patients during the first internal medicine clerkship...
  15. ncbi "Face-to-face with It": medical students' narratives about their end-of-life education
    Delese Wear
    Behavioral Sciences, Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine NEOUCOM, 4209 State Route 44, PO Box 95, Rootstown, OH 44272 0095, USA
    Acad Med 77:271-7. 2002
    ..The author concludes with recommendations for thoughtful, integrative, interdisciplinary curriculum changes in EOL education...
  16. ncbi Dying, dignity, and new horizons in palliative end-of-life care
    Harvey Max Chochinov
    DepartmentManitoba Palliative Care Research Unit, Cancer Care Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
    CA Cancer J Clin 56:84-103; quiz 104-5. 2006
    ....
  17. ncbi Senior medical students' perceptions of the adequacy of education on end-of-life issues
    H C Fraser
    University of Colorado Health Sciences Center School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado, USA
    J Palliat Med 4:337-43. 2001
    ....
  18. ncbi Factors influencing death at home in terminally ill cancer patients
    Shunsuke Nakamura
    Department of Home Care Management, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan
    Geriatr Gerontol Int 10:154-60. 2010
    ..The purpose of this study is to investigate factors affecting terminally ill cancer patients dying at home...
  19. ncbi The desire for hastened death in patients with metastatic cancer
    Gary Rodin
    Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada
    J Pain Symptom Manage 33:661-75. 2007
    ..The relative absence of a strong DHD in this sample suggests that the will to live tends to be preserved in cancer patients prior to the end of life, in spite of significant emotional and physical suffering...
  20. ncbi Residents' end-of-life decision making with adult hospitalized patients: a review of the literature
    Todd E Gorman
    L Hôtel Dieu de Québec, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada
    Acad Med 80:622-33. 2005
    ....
  21. ncbi Dying to be home? Preferred location of death of first-generation black Caribbean and native-born white patients in the United Kingdom
    Jonathan Koffman
    Department of Palliative Care and Policy, Guy s King s and St Thomas Schools of Medicine, King s College London, Weston Education Centre, London, United Kingdom
    J Palliat Med 7:628-36. 2004
    ....
  22. ncbi Evaluating palliative care: bereaved family members' evaluations of patients' pain, anxiety and depression
    Christine J McPherson
    Department of Palliative Care and Policy C J McP, J M A H, Guy s, King s and St Thomas School of Medicine, King s College, London, United Kingdom
    J Pain Symptom Manage 28:104-14. 2004
    ..Recommendations are made to improve the design of retrospective palliative care surveys...
  23. ncbi Effectiveness of an integrated ward-based program in preparing medical students to care for patients at the end of life
    Matthew S Ellman
    Yale University School of Medicine, Yale Internal Medicine Associates, 789 Howard Avenue, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Am J Hosp Palliat Care 26:18-23. 2009
    ..05) and management of common symptoms (3.3 vs 3.0; P < .01). We conclude that a ward-based integrated end-of-life care exercise may improve graduating students' self-reported preparedness to care for patients at the end of life...
  24. ncbi Palliative medicine Death Rounds: small group learning on a vital subject
    Judith A Kitzes
    Palliative Care Section, School of Medicine, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA
    Am J Hosp Palliat Care 25:483-91. 2008
    ..Death Rounds at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine is a small group educational model that promotes student self-reflection, metacognition, professional growth, and collegial support...
  25. ncbi Reasons why people in Switzerland seek assisted suicide: the view of patients and physicians
    Susanne Fischer
    Evaluation Office, University of Zurich, Switzerland
    Swiss Med Wkly 139:333-8. 2009
    ..We examined the reasons physicians provided for writing the prescription and the reasons patients gave for requesting assistance in dying...
  26. ncbi Preparing for the end of life: preferences of patients, families, physicians, and other care providers
    K E Steinhauser
    Program on the Medical Encounter and Palliative Care, Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    J Pain Symptom Manage 22:727-37. 2001
    ..Further research and training are needed to ensure that the desire for greater preparation is translated into improved action toward preparation in medical practice...
  27. ncbi Dying in an acute hospital setting: the challenges and solutions
    R Al-Qurainy
    Palliative Medicine, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London, UK
    Int J Clin Pract 63:508-15. 2009
    ....
  28. pmc A "good death": perspectives of Muslim patients and health care providers
    Mohamad A Tayeb
    North West Armed Forces Hospitals, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia
    Ann Saudi Med 30:215-21. 2010
    ..This study aimed to review the TFHCOP good death perception to determine its validity for Muslim patients and health care providers, and to identify and describe other components of the Muslim good death perspective...
  29. ncbi The role of cognitive impairment in desire for hastened death: a study of patients with advanced AIDS
    Hayley Pessin
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA
    Gen Hosp Psychiatry 25:194-9. 2003
    ..Aggressive treatment of cognitive symptoms in the terminally ill is necessary in order to disentangle the various factors that may drive end-of-life treatment decisions...
  30. ncbi The quality of dying and death
    Sarah Hales
    Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Arch Intern Med 168:912-8. 2008
    ..Quality of dying and death is broader in scope than either quality of life at the end of life or quality of care at the end of life, although there is overlap among these constructs...
  31. ncbi Mind frames towards dying and factors motivating their adoption by terminally ill elders
    Tracy A Schroepfer
    School of Social Work, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci 61:S129-39. 2006
    ..This study was designed to advance the understanding of the physical and psychosocial factors that motivate terminally ill elders not only to consider a hastened death but also not to consider such a death...
  32. ncbi Agreement among family members in their assessment of the Quality of Dying and Death
    Richard Mularski
    Department of Medicine, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, The University of California, 90073, USA
    J Pain Symptom Manage 28:306-15. 2004
    ....
  33. ncbi The prevalence of psychiatric disorder and the wish to hasten death among terminally ill cancer patients
    Brian J Kelly
    Center for Rural and Remote Mental Health, University of Newcastle, Orange, Australia
    Palliat Support Care 2:163-9. 2004
    ..This study assessed the prevalence of psychiatric disorder among a group of terminally ill cancer patients with or without a wish to hasten death (WTHD)...
  34. ncbi Older peoples' attitudes towards euthanasia and an end-of-life pill in The Netherlands: 2001-2009
    Hilde M Buiting
    Department of Social Medicine, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    J Med Ethics 38:267-73. 2012
    ..With an ageing population, end-of-life care is increasing in importance. The present work investigated characteristics and time trends of older peoples' attitudes towards euthanasia and an end-of-life pill...
  35. ncbi Correspondence between patients' preferences and surrogates' understandings for dying and death
    Ruth A Engelberg
    Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98104, USA
    J Pain Symptom Manage 30:498-509. 2005
    ..These discussions may enable surrogates and clinicians to more accurately follow patient preferences...
  36. ncbi Wish to die in end-stage ALS
    Mandaville Gourie-Devi
    Neurology 68:79; author reply 79. 2007
  37. ncbi Seven deaths in Darwin: case studies under the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act, Northern Territory, Australia
    D W Kissane
    University of Melbourne Centre for Palliative Care, Kew, Victoria, Australia
    Lancet 352:1097-102. 1998
    ..Seven patients made formal use of the Rights of the Terminally Ill (ROTI) Act; four died under the Act. We report their clinical details and the decision-making process required by the Act...
  38. ncbi Factors that influence consideration of hastening death among people with life-threatening illnesses
    Elizabeth Mayfield Arnold
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston Salem, NC 27157 1087, USA
    Health Soc Work 29:17-26. 2004
    ..Pain and anxiety appeared to play no role in distinguishing between the two groups. The results are presented and implications for social work practice and research are discussed...
  39. pmc Relations between desire for early death, depressive symptoms and antidepressant prescribing in terminally ill patients with cancer
    E Tiernan
    Our Lady s Hospice, Harold s Cross, Dublin 6W, Ireland
    J R Soc Med 95:386-90. 2002
    ..Better recognition and treatment of depression might improve the lives of people with terminal illness and so lessen desire for early death, whether natural or by suicide...
  40. ncbi End-of-life decision making for cancer patients in different clinical settings and the impact of the LCP
    Agnes van der Heide
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    J Pain Symptom Manage 39:33-43. 2010
    ..The LCP has an impact on the use of potentially life-shortening medication during the dying phase. Communication about medical decision making tends to be better in the nursing home and at home...
  41. ncbi How well do current instruments using bereaved relatives' views evaluate care for dying patients?
    Cr Mayland
    Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals Trust, Liverpool, UK
    Palliat Med 22:133-44. 2008
    ..Using the views of patients has practical and ethical difficulties, so an alternative approach is to seek the views of bereaved relatives and close friends after the patients' death...
  42. ncbi Understanding the will to live in patients nearing death
    Harvey Max Chochinov
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
    Psychosomatics 46:7-10. 2005
    ..Health care providers must learn to appreciate the importance of existential issues and their ability to influence the will to live among patients nearing death...
  43. ncbi The will to live: gender differences among elderly persons
    S Carmel
    Department of the Sociology of Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel
    Soc Sci Med 52:949-58. 2001
    ..The implications of these findings for the study of the perceived meaningfulness of life, and the potential use of the will to live as an indicator of well-being are discussed...
  44. ncbi Terminally ill cancer patients' wish to hasten death
    B Kelly
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Queensland, Woolloongabba, Australia
    Palliat Med 16:339-45. 2002
    ..The implications of these findings will be discussed...
  45. ncbi The desire for hastened death in individuals with advanced cancer: a longitudinal qualitative study
    Rinat Nissim
    Behavioural Sciences and Health Research Division, Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada
    Soc Sci Med 69:165-71. 2009
    ....
  46. ncbi Informal carer bereavement outcome: relation to quality of end of life support and achievement of preferred place of death
    G E Grande
    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, University Place, Oxford Road, Manchester, UK
    Palliat Med 23:248-56. 2009
    ..The level of support, particularly psychological, may be more important for carers' bereavement outcome than achievement of the preferred place of death for the patient...
  47. ncbi Expressed desire for hastened death in seven patients living with advanced cancer: a phenomenologic inquiry
    Nessa Coyle
    Pain and Palliative Care Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA
    Oncol Nurs Forum 31:699-709. 2004
    ..To explore the meanings and uses of an expressed desire for hastened death in seven patients living with advanced cancer...
  48. ncbi The art of medicine: teaching oncology fellows about the end of life
    T Gilewski
    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Crit Rev Oncol Hematol 40:105-13. 2001
    ..A variety of topics are discussed, with the intention to broaden perspectives of physicians and thereby facilitate changes in our approach to the end of life...
  49. ncbi Voices of the terminally ill: uncovering the meaning of desire for euthanasia
    Yvonne Yi Wood Mak
    Bradbury Hospice, A Kung Kok Shan Road, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong
    Palliat Med 19:343-50. 2005
    ..Euthanasia requests cannot be taken at face value but require in-depth exploration of their covert meaning, in order to ensure that the patients' needs are being addressed adequately...
  50. ncbi End-of-life care pathways as tools to promote and support a good death: a critical commentary
    T Watts
    Department of Nursing, College of Human and Health Sciences, Swansea University, Swansea, UK
    Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) 21:20-30. 2012
    ..Nonetheless drawing on a diverse range of evidence the literature indicates that end-of-life care pathways may facilitate a certain type of 'good death' and one which is associated with the dying process and framed within biomedicine...
  51. ncbi Terminal patients' awareness of impending death: the impact upon requesting adequate care
    Anneke L Francke
    NIVEL the Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    Cancer Nurs 28:241-7. 2005
    ..In the concluding part of this article, there is a plea for adopting a proactive approach. Nurses and other caregivers must try to prepare patients and relatives early for the care that will become necessary in the later stages...
  52. ncbi Desire for death and requests to hasten death of Japanese terminally ill cancer patients receiving specialized inpatient palliative care
    Tatsuya Morita
    Seirei Hospice, Seirei Mikatabara Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan
    J Pain Symptom Manage 27:44-52. 2004
    ..However, some patients with a strong wish to control the time of death might not receive benefit from conventional palliative care...
  53. ncbi The wish to hasten death: a review of clinical studies
    Cristina Monforte-Royo
    Escola Universitària d Infermera Gimbernat, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
    Psychooncology 20:795-804. 2011
    ..Further clinical research is needed to provide a complete understanding of this phenomenon and to foster the development of suitable care plans...
  54. ncbi Reframing hope: meaning-centered care for patients near the end of life. Interview by Karen S. Heller
    William Breitbart
    Department of Psychiatry, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021, USA
    J Palliat Med 6:979-88. 2003
  55. ncbi 'Memorable patient deaths': reactions of hospital doctors and their need for support
    Thomas S Moores
    Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    Med Educ 41:942-6. 2007
    ....
  56. ncbi Family experience caring for terminally ill patients with cancer in Hong Kong
    Esther Mok
    School of Nursing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong
    Cancer Nurs 26:267-75. 2003
    ....
  57. ncbi The effect of the Liverpool Care Pathway for the dying: a multi-centre study
    Laetitia Veerbeek
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Palliat Med 22:145-51. 2008
    ..LCP use contributes to the quality of documentation and symptom control...
  58. ncbi Attitudes toward transplantation in U.K. Muslim Indo-Asians in west London
    Fawzi S Alkhawari
    Department of Primary Care and Social Medicine, Imperial College London, UK
    Am J Transplant 5:1326-31. 2005
    ..We believe these data suggest a need to improve in a culturally sensitive fashion the provision of health information provided to this community...
  59. ncbi Nurses' experiences with hospice patients who refuse food and fluids to hasten death
    Linda Ganzini
    Department of Veterans Affairs, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oreg, USA
    N Engl J Med 349:359-65. 2003
    ..Voluntary refusal of food and fluids has been proposed as an alternative to physician-assisted suicide for terminally ill patients who wish to hasten death. There are few reports of patients who have made this choice...
  60. pmc Doctors' emotional reactions to recent death of a patient: cross sectional study of hospital doctors
    Ellen M Redinbaugh
    Department of Behavioural Medicine and Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, 5150 Centre Ave 445, Pittsburgh, PA 15232, USA
    BMJ 327:185. 2003
    ..To describe doctors' emotional reactions to the recent death of an "average" patient and to explore the effects of level of training on doctors' reactions...
  61. ncbi Predictors associated with the place of death in a country with increasing hospital deaths
    Young Ho Yun
    Quality of Cancer Care Branch, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center 809, Madu dong, Ilsan gu, Goyang si, Gyeonggi Do, 411 769, Korea
    Palliat Med 20:455-61. 2006
    ..To evaluate the contribution of type of illness, socio-demographic factors, and area of residence to the place of death in a country with increasing hospital deaths...
  62. ncbi Faith in transplants
    Elizabeth Lynch
    Nurs Stand 19:24-7. 2005
    ..A reluctance to talk about the possibility of donation after death is coupled with misconceptions about religious teaching on the subject...
  63. pmc Wish to die in end-stage ALS
    S M Albert
    The Eleanor and Lou Gehrig MDA ALS Research Center, Department of Neurology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA
    Neurology 65:68-74. 2005
    ..In retrospective studies, estimates of hastened dying among seriously ill patients range from <2% in one national survey to as much as 20% in end-stage disease cohorts...
  64. ncbi Dignity-conserving care--a new model for palliative care: helping the patient feel valued
    Harvey Max Chochinov
    PX246, 771 Bannatyne Ave, Winnipeg Manitoba R3E 3N4 Canada
    JAMA 287:2253-60. 2002
    ..Dignity-conserving care offers an approach that clinicians can use to explicitly target the maintenance of dignity as a therapeutic objective and as a principle of bedside care for patients nearing death...
  65. ncbi Retrieving the ars moriendi tradition
    Carlo Leget
    Department of Ethics, Philosophy and History of Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    Med Health Care Philos 10:313-9. 2007
    ..The importance of retrieving the ancient ars moriendi outreaches the boundaries of palliative medicine, since it deals with issues that play a central role in every context of medical intervention and treatment...
  66. ncbi Attitudes towards end-of-life issues in disorders of consciousness: a European survey
    A Demertzi
    Coma Science Group, Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Liege, Allée du 6 août no 8, Sart Tilman B30, 4000, Liege, Belgium
    J Neurol 258:1058-65. 2011
    ..Given the observed individual variability, we stress the importance of advance directives and identification of proxies when discussing end-of-life issues in patients with disorders of consciousness...
  67. ncbi Preferences of the Dutch general public for a good death and associations with attitudes towards end-of-life decision-making
    Judith A C Rietjens
    Department of Public Health, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Palliat Med 20:685-92. 2006
    ..Insight in the relationships of such acceptance, with characteristics considered important for a 'good death', may contribute to the understanding of this liberal attitude...
  68. ncbi Effect of spiritual well-being on end-of-life despair in terminally-ill cancer patients
    Colleen S McClain
    Fordham University, Bronx, NY 10458, USA
    Lancet 361:1603-7. 2003
    ..The importance of spirituality in coping with a terminal illness is becoming increasingly recognised. We aimed to assess the relation between spiritual well-being, depression, and end-of-life despair in terminally-ill cancer patients...
  69. ncbi What is a good death? Terminally ill patients dealing with normative expectations around death and dying
    Minke Goldsteen
    Department of Health Care Ethics and Philosophy, Maastricht University, P O Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Patient Educ Couns 64:378-86. 2006
    ..This article aims to offer an insight in the way terminally ill patients talk about death and dying and how they refer to current western normative expectations about a 'good' death...
  70. ncbi Hopelessness at the end of life: the utility of the hopelessness scale with terminally ill cancer patients
    Jennifer G Abbey
    Department of Psychology, Fordham University, Bronx, NY 10458, USA
    Br J Health Psychol 11:173-83. 2006
    ..Moreover, we sought to identify and remove potentially problematic items in order to ascertain a "purer" index of hopelessness for this population...
  71. ncbi Race and the intensive care unit: disparities and preferences for end-of-life care
    Howard B Degenholtz
    Center for Bioethics and Health Law, and Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Crit Care Med 31:S373-8. 2003
  72. ncbi Quality of life while dying: a qualitative study of terminally ill older men
    Elizabeth K Vig
    Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
    J Am Geriatr Soc 51:1595-601. 2003
    ..To characterize the experience of quality of life while dying from the perspective of terminally ill men...
  73. ncbi Attitudes and practices concerning the end of life: a comparison between physicians from the United States and from The Netherlands
    D L Willems
    Institute for Research in Extramural Medicine and the Department of Social Medicine, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Arch Intern Med 160:63-8. 2000
    ..This study compares attitudes and practices concerning the end-of-life decisions between physicians in the United States and in the Netherlands, using the same set of questions...
  74. ncbi Health care professionals' grief: a model based on occupational style and coping
    E M Redinbaugh
    University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, 3600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
    Psychooncology 10:187-98. 2001
    ....
  75. ncbi End-of-life care for hematological malignancies: the 'technological imperative' and palliative care
    Pam McGrath
    Department of Religion, School of History, Philosophy, Religion and Classics, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia
    J Palliat Care 18:39-47. 2002
    ..Such insights are placed in the context of descriptions of the patients' experience with treatment during the terminal stage...
  76. ncbi Euthanasia and other end-of-life decisions in the Netherlands in 1990, 1995, and 2001
    Bregje D Onwuteaka-Philipsen
    Department of Social Medicine and Institute for Research in Extramural Medicine, Vrije Universitat University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, Netherlands
    Lancet 362:395-9. 2003
    ..Since 1995, the demand for physician-assisted death has not risen among patients and physicians, who seem to have become somewhat more reluctant in their attitude towards this practice...
  77. ncbi Symptoms, treatment and "dying peacefully" in terminally ill cancer patients: a prospective study
    Jean Jacques Georges
    Department of Public and Occupational Health, Institute for Research in Extramural Medicine, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Support Care Cancer 13:160-8. 2005
    ..The aims of this study were to describe the symptoms, their treatment during the final months of life of terminally ill cancer patients and to assess characteristics of the dying process...
  78. pmc Choice and place of death: individual preferences, uncertainty, and the availability of care
    Daniel Munday
    Centre for Primary Health Care Studies, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
    J R Soc Med 100:211-5. 2007
  79. ncbi Palliative care for Muslim patients
    Mohammad Zafir al-Shahri
    King Faisal Cancer Center, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    J Support Oncol 3:432-6. 2005
  80. ncbi International differences in end-of-life attitudes in the intensive care unit: results of a survey
    Arino Yaguchi
    Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Erasme Hospital, Free University of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium
    Arch Intern Med 165:1970-5. 2005
    ..Important international differences exist in attitudes toward end-of-life issues in the intensive care unit...
  81. ncbi Preferred place of care: an analysis of the 'first 100' patient assessments
    Justin Wood
    Palliat Med 21:449-50. 2007
  82. ncbi Factors affecting grief reactions in close family members to individuals who have died of cancer
    G I Ringdal
    Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
    J Pain Symptom Manage 22:1016-26. 2001
    ....
  83. ncbi End-of-life care in the intensive care unit: can we do better?
    M M Levy
    Brown University, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI 02903, USA
    Crit Care Med 29:N56-61. 2001
    ..The quality of care our patients receive at the end of life will depend on our ability to answer these difficult questions...
  84. ncbi Evolution in measuring the quality of dying
    Karen E Steinhauser
    Program on the Medical Encounter and Palliative Care, Durham VA Medical Center and Division of General Internal Medicine, Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University, North Carolina 27705, USA
    J Palliat Med 5:407-14. 2002
    ..The purpose of this paper is to evaluate quality-of-life instruments currently used to assess the experiences of dying patients, and to offer a design for a next generation instrument to measure quality at the end of life...
  85. pmc Between hope and acceptance: the medicalisation of dying
    David Clark
    Academic Palliative Medicine Unit, University of Sheffield, Trent Palliative Care Centre, Sykes House, Sheffield S11 9NE
    BMJ 324:905-7. 2002
  86. ncbi Characteristics of end-of-life decisions: survey of UK medical practitioners
    Clive Seale
    School of Social Science and Law, Brunel University, Middlesex, UK
    Palliat Med 20:653-9. 2006
    ..To assess the extent to which UK doctors discuss end-of-life decisions (ELDs) with patients, relatives and colleagues, and to assess the degree to which patients' lives are shortened by ELDs...
  87. ncbi Dying while homeless: is it a concern when life itself is such a struggle?
    John Song
    Center for Bioethics and Medical School, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA
    J Clin Ethics 16:251-61. 2005
  88. ncbi Concise screening questions for clinical assessments of terminal care: the needs near the end-of-life care screening tool
    L L Emanuel
    Interdisciplinary Program in Professionalism and Human Rights, Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    J Palliat Med 4:465-74. 2001
    ..Evaluation of its performance in another population is needed to complete NEST's fuller evaluation...
  89. ncbi Factors predicting home death for terminally ill cancer patients receiving hospital-based home care: the Lyon comprehensive cancer center experience
    Gisèle Chvetzoff
    Home Care Coordinating Unit, Leon Berard Center, Lyon, France
    J Pain Symptom Manage 30:528-35. 2005
    ..A hospital-based home care unit is effective for bridging the gap between community and hospital. MCO home visits offer concrete support to health care professionals, patients, and relatives...
  90. ncbi The dying role
    Linda Emanuel
    Northwestern University, 750 N Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60611, USA
    J Palliat Med 10:159-68. 2007
    ..Lack thereof can impede good deaths and may have been in part responsible for the intense and often futile interventions provided to many dying patients in the past...
  91. ncbi What questions do family caregivers want to discuss with health care providers in order to prepare for the death of a loved one? An ethnographic study of caregivers of patients at end of life
    Randy Scott Hebert
    Division of General Internal Medicine, Section of Palliative Care and Medical Ethics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
    J Palliat Med 11:476-83. 2008
    ..To determine what questions family caregivers want to discuss with health care providers (HCPs) in order to prepare for the death of a loved one...
  92. ncbi Detoxifying death in the neonate: in search of meaningfulness at the end of life
    Jay M Milstein
    Division of Neonatalogy, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Davis 95616, USA
    J Perinatol 23:333-6. 2003
    ..Encouraging families to engage with their dying infants helps detoxify the experience and make it more meaningful...
  93. ncbi On reflection: doctors learning to care for people who are dying
    R D MacLeod
    Mary Potter Hospice, Wellington, New Zealand
    Soc Sci Med 52:1719-27. 2001
    ..The article asks whether their medical education had adequately prepared these doctors for this key element of their work. It recommends ways in which practitioners may be better prepared to care for people who are dying...
  94. ncbi General practitioners' experiences of the psychological aspects in the care of a dying patient
    Brian Kelly
    Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia
    Palliat Support Care 6:125-31. 2008
    ..This qualitative study investigated psychosocial issues faced by GPs in the management of patients receiving palliative care and investigated the themes relevant to the psychosocial care of dying patients...
  95. ncbi Place of death: hospital-based advanced home care versus conventional care. A prospective study in palliative cancer care
    Marianne Ahlner-Elmqvist
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Malmo University Hospital, Sweden
    Palliat Med 18:585-93. 2004
    ..Advanced hospital-based home care targeting seriously ill cancer patients with a wish to remain at home enable a substantial number of patients to die in the place they desire...
  96. ncbi "Getting everyone on the same page": nursing home physicians' perspectives on end-of-life care
    Mercedes Bern-Klug
    School of Social Work, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA
    J Palliat Med 7:533-44. 2004
    ..To improve understanding of nursing home physicians' perspectives regarding end-of-life care, and to suggest directions for further research...
  97. ncbi Good and bad dying from the perspective of terminally ill men
    Elizabeth K Vig
    Department of Medicine and Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
    Arch Intern Med 164:977-81. 2004
    ..Our current understanding of good and bad deaths, however, comes primarily from input from families and clinicians. This study aimed to learn how terminally ill men conceptualize good and bad deaths...
  98. ncbi Attitudes, experiences, and beliefs affecting end-of-life decision-making among homeless individuals
    Anita J Tarzian
    University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 1786, USA
    J Palliat Med 8:36-48. 2005
    ..Planning for death with individuals who have spent so much energy surviving requires an understanding of their experiences and preferences...
  99. ncbi Prognostic acceptance and the well-being of patients receiving palliative care for cancer
    Genevieve N Thompson
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba and Manitoba Palliative Care Research Unit, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
    J Clin Oncol 27:5757-62. 2009
    ..To identify the impact of prognostic acceptance/nonacceptance on the physical, psychological, and existential well-being of patients with advanced cancer...
  100. ncbi Seriously ill patients' discussions of preparation and life completion: an intervention to assist with transition at the end of life
    Karen E Steinhauser
    Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Palliat Support Care 7:393-404. 2009
    ..We developed an intervention based on life review and emotional disclosure literatures and conducted a pilot study to determine feasibility and acceptability. This article presents qualitative intervention responses...
  101. ncbi In search of a good death: observations of patients, families, and providers
    K E Steinhauser
    Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, North Carolina 27705, USA
    Ann Intern Med 132:825-32. 2000
    ..Biomedical care is critical, but it is only a point of departure toward total end-of-life care. For patients and families, psychosocial and spiritual issues are as important as physiologic concerns...

Research Grants71

  1. Hospice Intervention for Older Adults With End Stage Renal Disease
    Lewis Cohen; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  2. Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy in Advanced Cancer
    William Breitbart; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..Larger, randomized controlled trials of Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy will be conducted in the future utilizing the insights learned from this pilot intervention study. ..
  3. Improving Physician Skill at Providing End-of-Life Care
    J Curtis; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..The results will allow investigators and others to develop targeted educational and systemic interventions to improve the quality of this care. ..
  4. Depression, Cytokines, and Pancreatic Cancer
    William Breitbart; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  5. Balancing Hope & Truth-Telling for Patients with Ca/COPD
    J Curtis; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..These strategies will be described and translated into interventions targeting nurses, physicians, and teams who provide care for patients with cancer, COPD, and other life-limiting diseases. ..
  6. DEPRESSION/DESIRE FOR DEATH IN TERMINAL CANCER PATIENTS
    William Breitbart; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..This study is expected to provide a direct evaluation of desire for death in terminally ill cancer patients, and to ascertain whether a pharmacological treatment for depression influences desire for death. ..
  7. DESIRE FOR DEATH AMONG TERMINALLY ILL PATIENTS WITH AIDS
    William Breitbart; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ....
  8. Dignity Intervention for Terminally Ill Cancer Patients
    Harvey Chochinov; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..abstract_text> ..
  9. End of Life Communication Skills for Oncology Fellows
    Anthony Back; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..This program will create a formal curriculum for communication skills that could be replicated in many institutions to improve the quality of oncologists-patient communication--and ultimately the quality of cancer care--nationwide. ..
  10. Intervention to Improve Expression of End of Life Preference for Homeless Persons
    John Song; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  11. TREATMENT OF PANIC DISORDER LONG TERM STRATEGIES
    M Shear; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..These sites already have in place the trained and certified assessment and treatment personnel and rigorous monitoring procedures that are essential for the conduct of a study such as the one we propose. ..
  12. Communication in Late-stage Cancer: Exploring Hospice Decision
    DEBORAH PEASE WALDROP; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..3) Understanding how end-of-life decisions are made is essential for the efficient planning and delivery of comprehensive services for the growing number of adults who will die from cancer. ..
  13. SLEEP, FATIGUE, AND DEXAMETHOSONE IN CHILDHOOD CANCER
    Pamela Hinds; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Our study findings will explicate the relationship between sleep efficiency and fatigue, and between sleep, fatigue, and systemic exposure to dexamethasone. ..
  14. Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Stalking Offenders
    Barry Rosenfeld; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  15. Measuring hopelessness at the end of life
    Barry Rosenfeld; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  16. RELIGION, AGING, AND HEALTH
    Neal Krause; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Included among these procedures are individual growth curve models and latent variable structural equation models. [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  17. DHEA EFFECTS ON MOOD IN DEPRESSED HIV+ PATIENTS
    Judith Rabkin; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..This will permit the investigators to assess potential underlying mechanisms for the putative therapeutic effects of DHEA on mood, libido, and body composition. ..
  18. Patients' and families' home care service priorities
    David Casarett; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  19. Challenging Life Events in Older Persons
    TIMOTHY DAALEMAN; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..e. social support, mental health status. Secondary aims include learning how a baseline measure of patient spirituality predicts future death attitudes and discussions of advance care planning. ..
  20. Factors Related to Living Organ Donor Decision
    Marie Nolan; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..6. To explore the meaning of the decision to be a living kidney donor in a culturally diverse sample of living kidney donor candidates. [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  21. Understanding and Implementing End of Life Preferences
    ELIZABETH VIG; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  22. Improving Care for Children with Advanced Cancer
    Joanne Wolfe; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  23. Patient-Centered Approach to Advance Care Planning
    KARIN KIRCHHOFF; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  24. Modafinil Treatment for Fatigue in HIV+ Patients
    Judith Rabkin; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..The major aims concern modafinil efficacy for fatigue compared to placebo, safety in terms of effects on immunologic/virologic measures, and impact on depressive symptoms when present at baseline. ..
  25. Decisionmaking in Pediatric Palliative Care
    JOHN FEUDTNER; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  26. The Morality of Caregiving for Demented Older Women
    HELEN BLACK; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Data will aid public health understanding of the meaning of caregiving to CGs, the lifeworlds of at-home CGs, and potentially inform public health policy and intervention based on this knowledge. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  27. Intervention Development for Complicated Grief
    Wendy Lichtenthal; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Broad, long-term objectives of this study include the development of effective psychosocial interventions for bereaved individuals, particularly those suffering from CG. ..
  28. Patient Preference in Primary Care Depression Treatment
    Patrick Raue; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..abstract_text> ..
  29. Religion, Aging, and Mexican American Health
    Neal Krause; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..To compare and contrast race differences in religiousness as well as race differences in the relationship between religion and health among older Whites, older Blacks, and older Mexican Americans. ..
  30. Functional Health CAT in Diabetes
    Carolyn Schwartz; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..abstract_text> ..
  31. An Intervention to Improve End-of-life Sympton Distress
    Ellen Redinbaugh; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ....
  32. NATURAL HISTORY OF END OF LIFE DECISION MAKING
    Marie Nolan; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..3)There will be a change from more control to less control in patients' decision control preferences as they approach death ..
  33. Interactive Distance Learning Program in Palliative Care
    Linda Emanuel; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..Some needed metrics for evaluating palliative care education; and 3. Information on which features of distance learning result in the greatest educational impact. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  34. DYING AT HOME OF AIDS & CANCER: PREFERENCES & OUTCOMES
    Judith Rabkin; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..The data collected in the preliminary study will be used in the full-scale study. ..
  35. END OF LIFE PREFERENCES & OUTCOMES: PATIENTS & SPOUSES
    Rachel Pruchno; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..Analyses would focus on both cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal relationships using a combination of a regression, structural equation modeling, and categorical data analysis techniques. ..
  36. Work-Family Conflicts of Older Women
    Rachel Pruchno; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ....
  37. The Impact of Dragon Boat Racing on Cancer Survivorship
    Cynthia Carter; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  38. Patient perceptions of bioengineered probiotics and clinical metagenomics
    RICHARD R contact SHARP; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  39. DEPRESSION AND END OF LIFE CARE IN ALS
    Steven Albert; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..This information will be critical for understanding the experience of patients with terminal disease as they and their families face end-of-life care decisions. ..
  40. CONTINGENCIES OF SELF ESTEEM
    Jennifer Crocker; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..unreadable] [unreadable]..
  41. A Conference Grant to Support the 29th Annual Meeting of SMDM
    Cindy Bryce; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  42. Mentor Mothers: A Sustainable Family Intervention in South African Townships
    Mary J Rotheram Borus; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..The intervention's impact will be assessed over 15 months in a design that is a blend of an efficacy and effectiveness trial. ..
  43. Promoting Health & Functioning in Persons with SMI
    Stephen Bartels; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..If found to be effective, ISL will provide a practical approach to improving health, independent functioning, and longevity in disabled persons with SMI. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  44. Defensive Responses to Thoughts of Death in Older Adults
    Thomas Pyszczynski; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  45. Treating PTSD in Children Exposed to Domestic Violence
    Judith Cohen; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..abstract_text> ..
  46. Religion and Suicidal Behavior Among Black Americans
    Sean Joe; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  47. Presenting Diagnostic Results from Large-Scale Clinical Mutation Testing
    Richard R Sharp; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  48. Treatment of Early Age Mania
    Karen Wagner; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..The chief study statistician, Dr. Satish lyengar is subcontracted to the coordinating site at Washington U in St. Louis and Dr. Philip Lavori is a major consultant for statistical analyses. [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  49. IMPACT OF AIDS ON ADOLESCENTS TRANSITION TO ADULTHOOD
    MARY ROTHERAM BORUS; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ....
  50. CHILD AND FAMILY FUNCTIONING AFTER PEDIATRIC HEAD TRAUMA
    JoAnne Youngblut; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..If nursing research and care can facilitate achieving these objectives, burden on health care, educational, and family systems will be reduced. ..
  51. Pharmacologic Treat. of PTSD in Sexually Abused Children
    Judith Cohen; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ....
  52. CLUB DRUG USE AND MEN'S HEALTH--A COMMUNITY STUDY
    Perry Halkitis; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ....
  53. PSYCHIATRIC AND PHYSICAL EFFECTS OF CAREGIVING
    Richard Schulz; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..Mortality rates among care-recipients are high enough in this study to enable us to examine the effects of bereavement in a relatively large sample of elderly spousal pairs. ..
  54. Decision Making in End-Stage Heart Failure
    Paul Hauptman; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  55. Web-Based Support for Informal Caregivers in Cancer
    David Gustafson; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..We also hypothesize that CGCHESS+CR will improve the outcomes more and that minority caregivers will benefit more than Caucasians. Our process analyses will study the mechanisms of CHESS effect. ..
  56. Caregiver Intervention for Caregivers of SCI Patients
    Richard Schulz; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..The analytic plan will enable us to assess causal links between treatment components and specific outcomes as well as explore cultural and racial variations in treatment effectiveness. ..
  57. Improving Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy
    Judith Erlen; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..A similar approach will be used for the secondary aims examining intervention effect on clinical response and quality of life. Exploratory aims will be examined using structural equation modeling. ..
  58. PALLIATIVE CARE ROLE MODEL PROGRAM
    Susan Block; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..The impact of this comprehensive educational intervention on medical students, residents, and faculty will be evaluated using multiple measures, and information about the program and its outcomes will be widely disseminated. ..
  59. EVALUATION OF A CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF ORGAN DONATION
    James Rodrigue; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..abstract_text> ..
  60. The Social Context of Unintended Pregnancy in College-aged Women
    MELISSA LEHAN MACKIN; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..This knowledge will contribute to improved public health interventions, lead to a decrease in disparities in access to health care, and allow for informed health policy decisions. ..
  61. PREVENTING TREATMENT ATTRITION IN CHILD THERAPY
    Matthew Nock; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..abstract_text> ..
  62. End of Life Decisions: Differences in Patient and Proxy Treatment Preferences
    SUSAN PARKS; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..A better understanding of these factors will ultimately improve the shared decision making done between healthcare providers and families at the end of life for decisionally-incapacitated patients. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  63. Prevalence of and Risk and Protective Factors for Suicidal Behaviors
    Matthew Nock; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  64. PECAM-1'S INVOLVEMENT IN ANGIOGENESIS
    Horace Delisser; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ....
  65. A Technology-Enhanced Nursing Intervention for Hospice Caregivers
    George Demiris; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  66. Efficacy of Massage Therapy at the End of Life
    Jean Kutner; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Analyses will determine the independent influence of the intervention (a series of massage therapy sessions) on the identified outcomes (pain, physical and emotional symptom distress, quality of life). ..
  67. Depression & Adherence in Head and Neck Cancer
    Eileen Shinn; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Pain, fatigue, and social support will be tested as mediators of the intervention's potential effect on depression levels. ..
  68. PECAM-1 and Alveolization
    Horace Delisser; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..unreadable] [unreadable]..
  69. Depression Screening & Treatment in Ovarian Cancer
    Eileen Shinn; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Drs. Rehm and Taylor will co-supervise Dr. Shinn in the CBT administration. This intervention is innovative and has not been done before with any group of cancer patients, including ovarian cancer patients. ..