bacterial chromosomes

Summary

Summary: Structures within the nucleus of bacterial cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Complete genome sequence of the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)
    S D Bentley
    The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK
    Nature 417:141-7. 2002
  2. ncbi Deciphering the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the complete genome sequence
    S T Cole
    Sanger Centre, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, UK
    Nature 393:537-44. 1998
  3. pmc An efficient recombination system for chromosome engineering in Escherichia coli
    D Yu
    Gene Regulation and Chromosome Biology Laboratory and Mouse Cancer Genetics Program, National Cancer Institute, Division of Basic Science, National Cancer Institute Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, Frederick, MD 21702, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97:5978-83. 2000
  4. ncbi Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin stress response loci
    Kenn Gerdes
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, DK 5230 Odense M, Denmark
    Nat Rev Microbiol 3:371-82. 2005
  5. pmc Growth phase-dependent variation in protein composition of the Escherichia coli nucleoid
    T Ali Azam
    Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Shizuoka 411 8540, Japan
    J Bacteriol 181:6361-70. 1999
  6. pmc Rapid and sequential movement of individual chromosomal loci to specific subcellular locations during bacterial DNA replication
    Patrick H Viollier
    Department of Developmental Biology, Beckman Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:9257-62. 2004
  7. pmc A dynamic, mitotic-like mechanism for bacterial chromosome segregation
    Michael A Fogel
    Genetics Program, Tufts University School of Medicine, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA
    Genes Dev 20:3269-82. 2006
  8. ncbi Genome sequence of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7
    N T Perna
    Genome Center of Wisconsin, and Department of Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706, USA
    Nature 409:529-33. 2001
  9. pmc The new gene mukB codes for a 177 kd protein with coiled-coil domains involved in chromosome partitioning of E. coli
    H Niki
    Department of Molecular Genetics, Kumamoto University Medical School, Japan
    EMBO J 10:183-93. 1991
  10. ncbi Spatial and temporal organization of replicating Escherichia coli chromosomes
    Ivy F Lau
    Division of Molecular Genetics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU, UK
    Mol Microbiol 49:731-43. 2003

Research Grants

  1. Variation in M. tuberculosis in response to host selection
    Sarah Fortune; Fiscal Year: 2009
  2. Development of transformed lactobacilli as a microbicide
    Richard B Markham; Fiscal Year: 2010
  3. Listeria-Based Therapeutic Cancer Vaccine for Melanoma
    Dirk G Brockstedt; Fiscal Year: 2011
  4. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance
    George A Jacoby; Fiscal Year: 2013
  5. Topoisomerases and Chromosome Segregation
    Kenneth J Marians; Fiscal Year: 2012
  6. Effects of the nucleoid protein H-NS on RNAP elongation
    Matthew V Kotlajich; Fiscal Year: 2013
  7. Dynamics and regulation of sister chromosome cohesion in E. coli.
    David Bates; Fiscal Year: 2013
  8. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPE
    William S Talbot; Fiscal Year: 2010
  9. Mechanisms of Gonococcal Pilin Antigenic and Phase Variation
    Hank S Seifert; Fiscal Year: 2013
  10. MECHANISM, ACTIVATION, AND CONTROL OF RRNA TRANSCRIPTION
    Richard L Gourse; Fiscal Year: 2013

Detail Information

Publications274 found, 100 shown here

  1. ncbi Complete genome sequence of the model actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)
    S D Bentley
    The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK
    Nature 417:141-7. 2002
    ..The genome sequence will greatly increase our understanding of microbial life in the soil as well as aiding the generation of new drug candidates by genetic engineering...
  2. ncbi Deciphering the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the complete genome sequence
    S T Cole
    Sanger Centre, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, UK
    Nature 393:537-44. 1998
    ....
  3. pmc An efficient recombination system for chromosome engineering in Escherichia coli
    D Yu
    Gene Regulation and Chromosome Biology Laboratory and Mouse Cancer Genetics Program, National Cancer Institute, Division of Basic Science, National Cancer Institute Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, Frederick, MD 21702, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97:5978-83. 2000
    ..This system will be especially useful for the engineering of large bacterial plasmids such as those from bacterial artificial chromosome libraries...
  4. ncbi Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin stress response loci
    Kenn Gerdes
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, DK 5230 Odense M, Denmark
    Nat Rev Microbiol 3:371-82. 2005
    ..It has been proposed that toxin-antitoxin loci function in bacterial programmed cell death, but evidence now indicates that these loci provide a control mechanism that helps free-living prokaryotes cope with nutritional stress...
  5. pmc Growth phase-dependent variation in protein composition of the Escherichia coli nucleoid
    T Ali Azam
    Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Shizuoka 411 8540, Japan
    J Bacteriol 181:6361-70. 1999
    ..These changes in the composition of nucleoid-associated proteins in the stationary phase are accompanied by compaction of the genome DNA and silencing of the genome functions...
  6. pmc Rapid and sequential movement of individual chromosomal loci to specific subcellular locations during bacterial DNA replication
    Patrick H Viollier
    Department of Developmental Biology, Beckman Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:9257-62. 2004
    ....
  7. pmc A dynamic, mitotic-like mechanism for bacterial chromosome segregation
    Michael A Fogel
    Genetics Program, Tufts University School of Medicine, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA
    Genes Dev 20:3269-82. 2006
    ..These data suggest that ParAI forms a dynamic structure that pulls the ParBI-bound chromosome to the pole in a process analogous to anaphase of eukaryotic mitosis...
  8. ncbi Genome sequence of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7
    N T Perna
    Genome Center of Wisconsin, and Department of Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706, USA
    Nature 409:529-33. 2001
    ..These include candidate virulence factors, alternative metabolic capacities, several prophages and other new functions--all of which could be targets for surveillance...
  9. pmc The new gene mukB codes for a 177 kd protein with coiled-coil domains involved in chromosome partitioning of E. coli
    H Niki
    Department of Molecular Genetics, Kumamoto University Medical School, Japan
    EMBO J 10:183-93. 1991
    ..At high temperature the mukB null mutants cannot form colonies and many nucleoids are distributed irregularly along elongated cells. We conclude that the MukB protein is required for chromosome partitioning in E. coli...
  10. ncbi Spatial and temporal organization of replicating Escherichia coli chromosomes
    Ivy F Lau
    Division of Molecular Genetics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU, UK
    Mol Microbiol 49:731-43. 2003
    ..This asymmetry could provide a mechanism by which the chromosome segregation protein FtsK, located at the division septum, can act directionally to ensure that the septal region is free of DNA before the completion of cell division...
  11. pmc Association of nucleoid proteins with coding and non-coding segments of the Escherichia coli genome
    David C Grainger
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Nucleic Acids Res 34:4642-52. 2006
    ..Hence some targets are associated with combinations of bound FIS, H-NS and IHF. In addition, many regions associated with FIS and H-NS are also associated with RNA polymerase...
  12. pmc Chromosome and replisome dynamics in E. coli: loss of sister cohesion triggers global chromosome movement and mediates chromosome segregation
    David Bates
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA
    Cell 121:899-911. 2005
    ..We propose that cell division licenses the next round of replication initiation via these changes...
  13. pmc Genomic plasticity of the causative agent of melioidosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei
    Matthew T G Holden
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:14240-5. 2004
    ..mallei. We propose that variable horizontal gene acquisition by B. pseudomallei is an important feature of recent genetic evolution and that this has resulted in a genetically diverse pathogenic species...
  14. ncbi DNA dynamics vary according to macrodomain topography in the E. coli chromosome
    Olivier Espeli
    Centre de Génétique Moléculaire du CNRS, Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif sur Yvette, France
    Mol Microbiol 68:1418-27. 2008
    ..Third, the Ter macrodomain is rapidly segregated before division, after a significant period of colocalization. Macrodomain territories defined as cellular spaces occupied by the different macrodomains can be identified...
  15. ncbi Complete genome sequence of a multiple drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CT18
    J Parkhill
    The Sanger Centre, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK
    Nature 413:848-52. 2001
    ..typhi. CT18 harbours a 218,150-bp multiple-drug-resistance incH1 plasmid (pHCM1), and a 106,516-bp cryptic plasmid (pHCM2), which shows recent common ancestry with a virulence plasmid of Yersinia pestis...
  16. ncbi Complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2
    M McClelland
    Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, 10835 Altman Row, San Diego, California 92121, USA
    Nature 413:852-6. 2001
    ..Most of these homologues were previously unknown, and 50 may be exported to the periplasm or outer membrane, rendering them accessible as therapeutic or vaccine targets...
  17. ncbi A general system for generating unlabelled gene replacements in bacterial chromosomes
    K Leenhouts
    Department of Genetics, University of Groningen, Haren, The Netherlands
    Mol Gen Genet 253:217-24. 1996
    ..A feasibility study was performed using Lactococcus lactis and Bacillus subtilis as model organisms. The results indicate that the method should be applicable to any non-essential gene in numerous bacterial species...
  18. ncbi The role of nucleoid-associated proteins in the organization and compaction of bacterial chromatin
    Remus T Dame
    Physics of Complex Systems, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Mol Microbiol 56:858-70. 2005
    ..Many of these new insights can be attributed to the use of recently developed biophysical techniques...
  19. ncbi Escherichia coli and its chromosome
    Rodrigo Reyes-Lamothe
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, UK
    Trends Microbiol 16:238-45. 2008
    ....
  20. pmc MukB colocalizes with the oriC region and is required for organization of the two Escherichia coli chromosome arms into separate cell halves
    Olessia Danilova
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QU, UK
    Mol Microbiol 65:1485-92. 2007
    ..We propose that MukBEF initiates the normal bidirectional organization of the chromosome from the oriC region...
  21. pmc Dancing around the divisome: asymmetric chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli
    Xindan Wang
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QU, United Kingdom
    Genes Dev 19:2367-77. 2005
    ..As ter duplicates at mid-cell, sister nucleoid separation appears complete. After initiation of invagination, the FtsZ ring disassembles, leaving FtsK to complete chromosome segregation and cytokinesis...
  22. ncbi A rapid and simple method for inactivating chromosomal genes in Yersinia
    Anne Derbise
    Unité de bactériologie moléculaire et médicale, Laboratoire des Yersinia, Institut Pasteur, 28 rue du Dr Roux, 75724 Paris Cedex 15, France
    FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol 38:113-6. 2003
    ..Using this method, three chromosomal loci were successfully disrupted in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The use of this technique allows rapid and efficient large-scale mutagenesis of Yersinia target chromosomal genes...
  23. ncbi Progressive segregation of the Escherichia coli chromosome
    Henrik J Nielsen
    BioCentrum DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK 2800 Kgs Lyngby, Denmark
    Mol Microbiol 61:383-93. 2006
    ..Segregation appears to leave one copy of each locus in place, and rapidly transport the other to the other side of the cell centre...
  24. ncbi Distinct segregation dynamics of the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes
    Michael A Fogel
    Program in Genetics, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
    Mol Microbiol 55:125-36. 2005
    ..The differences in localization and timing of segregation of oriCIvc and oriCIIvc suggest that distinct mechanisms govern the segregation of the two V. cholerae chromosomes...
  25. ncbi Inference and analysis of the relative stability of bacterial chromosomes
    Eduardo P C Rocha
    Unité Génétique des Génomes Bactériens, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France and Atelier de BioInformatique, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris VI, Paris, France
    Mol Biol Evol 23:513-22. 2006
    ..Hence, although this method has allowed uncovering some of mechanisms leading to rearrangements, we still ignore the forces that differentially shape selection upon genome stability in different species...
  26. ncbi SeqA: a negative modulator of replication initiation in E. coli
    M Lu
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
    Cell 77:413-26. 1994
    ..We suggest that SeqA might be a cooperativity factor, acting to make the replication initiation process dependent upon cooperative interactions among components...
  27. ncbi Complete genome sequence of a virulent isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae
    H Tettelin
    The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR, 9712 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
    Science 293:498-506. 2001
    ..Comparative genome hybridization with DNA arrays revealed strain differences in S. pneumoniae that could contribute to differences in virulence and antigenicity...
  28. pmc Macrodomain organization of the Escherichia coli chromosome
    Michèle Valens
    Centre de Génétique Moléculaire du CNRS, Avenue de la Terrasse, Gif sur Yvette, France
    EMBO J 23:4330-41. 2004
    ..Also the interactions between sister chromatids are rare, suggesting that chromosome segregation quickly follows replication. These results reveal structural features that may be important for chromosome dynamics during the cell cycle...
  29. pmc Epitope tagging of chromosomal genes in Salmonella
    S Uzzau
    Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 91198 Gif sur Yvette, France
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:15264-9. 2001
    ..The procedure described here should be applicable to a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria and is particularly suited for the study of intracellular pathogens...
  30. pmc Dynamic organization of chromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli
    H Niki
    Unit Process and Combined Circuit, PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Corporation JST, Kumamoto, 862 0976, Japan
    Genes Dev 14:212-23. 2000
    ..These studies thus suggest that the E. coli chromosome is organized to form a compacted ring structure with the Ori and Ter domains; these domains participate in the cell cycle-dependent localization of the chromosome...
  31. ncbi The composite genome of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti
    F Galibert
    UMR6061-CNRS, , , , F-35043 Rennes Cedex, France
    Science 293:668-72. 2001
    ..The genome sequence will be useful in understanding the dynamics of interkingdom associations and of life in soil environments...
  32. pmc Protein occupancy landscape of a bacterial genome
    Tiffany Vora
    Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    Mol Cell 35:247-53. 2009
    ..Our observations implicate these transcriptionally silent EPODs as the elusive organizing centers, long proposed to topologically isolate chromosomal domains...
  33. pmc Mauve: multiple alignment of conserved genomic sequence with rearrangements
    Aaron C E Darling
    Department of Computer Science, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    Genome Res 14:1394-403. 2004
    ..Recombination causes frequent genome rearrangements, horizontal transfer introduces new sequences into bacterial chromosomes, and deletions remove segments of the genome...
  34. pmc The two Escherichia coli chromosome arms locate to separate cell halves
    Xindan Wang
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QU, United Kingdom
    Genes Dev 20:1727-31. 2006
    ....
  35. pmc Insights into the evolution of Yersinia pestis through whole-genome comparison with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis
    P S G Chain
    Biology and Biotechnology Research Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:13826-31. 2004
    ..pestis. These results provide a sobering example of how a highly virulent epidemic clone can suddenly emerge from a less virulent, closely related progenitor...
  36. ncbi A variable genetic island specific for Neisseria gonorrhoeae is involved in providing DNA for natural transformation and is found more often in disseminated infection isolates
    J P Dillard
    Department of Microbiology Immunology, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL 60611, USA
    Mol Microbiol 41:263-77. 2001
    ..This genetic island constitutes the first major discriminating factor between the gonococcus and the other Neisseria and carries genes for providing DNA for genetic transformation...
  37. pmc chpA and chpB, Escherichia coli chromosomal homologs of the pem locus responsible for stable maintenance of plasmid R100
    Y Masuda
    Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, University of Tokyo, Japan
    J Bacteriol 175:6850-6. 1993
    ..These E. coli pem locus homologs may be involved in regulation of cell growth...
  38. pmc par genes and the pathology of chromosome loss in Vibrio cholerae
    Yoshiharu Yamaichi
    Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, Tufts University School of Medicine and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA 02111, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:630-5. 2007
    ..Like many other bacterial chromosomes, both V. cholerae chromosomes contain homologues of plasmid partitioning (par) genes...
  39. ncbi Spatial and temporal organization of the Bacillus subtilis replication cycle
    Melanie B Berkmen
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Mol Microbiol 62:57-71. 2006
    ..Our results provide new insights into how the replisome is positioned in the cell and refine our current understanding of the spatial and temporal events of the B. subtilis replication cycle...
  40. ncbi The initiator function of DnaA protein is negatively regulated by the sliding clamp of the E. coli chromosomal replicase
    T Katayama
    Department of Microbiology, Kyushu University Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka, Japan
    Cell 94:61-71. 1998
    ..In vivo, DnaA predominantly takes on the ADP form in a beta subunit-dependent manner. Thus, the initiator is negatively regulated by action of the replicase, a mechanism that may be key to effective control of the replication cycle...
  41. pmc Identification of genes subject to positive selection in uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli: a comparative genomics approach
    Swaine L Chen
    Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:5977-82. 2006
    ..coli isolates from patients with UTI. These studies outline a computational approach that may be broadly applicable for studying strain-specific adaptation and pathogenesis in other bacteria...
  42. ncbi Divided genomes: negotiating the cell cycle in prokaryotes with multiple chromosomes
    Elizabeth S Egan
    Genetics Program, Tufts University School of Medicine and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 136 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA 02111, USA
    Mol Microbiol 56:1129-38. 2005
    ..These divided genomes also introduce questions regarding chromosome evolution and genome stability. In this review, we discuss these and other issues, with particular emphasis on the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae...
  43. pmc Structural comparison of three types of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec integrated in the chromosome in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
    T Ito
    Department of Bacteriology, Juntendo University, Tokyo 113 8421, Japan
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 45:1323-36. 2001
    ..Our findings indicated that there are at least three distinct MRSA clones in the world with different types of SCCmec in their chromosome...
  44. ncbi The parAB gene products of Pseudomonas putida exhibit partition activity in both P. putida and Escherichia coli
    Anne Marie Godfrin-Estevenon
    Laboratoire de Microbiologie et Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse, France
    Mol Microbiol 43:39-49. 2002
    ..Three sequences similar to cis-acting stabilization sites of Bacillus subtilis are present in the P. putida oriC-parAB region. One was inserted into an unstable mini-F and shown to stabilize it in E. coli in a ParAB-dependent manner...
  45. pmc Role of SeqA and Dam in Escherichia coli gene expression: a global/microarray analysis
    Anders Løbner-Olesen
    Department of Life Sciences and Chemistry, Roskilde University, DK 4000 Roskilde, Denmark
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:4672-7. 2003
    ..We suggest that the methylation status of the cell is an important factor in forming and/or maintaining chromosome structure...
  46. ncbi Sister chromosome cohesion of Escherichia coli
    Y Sunako
    Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, Kuhonji 4-24-1, Kumamoto 862-0976, Japan
    Mol Microbiol 42:1233-41. 2001
    ..On the other hand, the cohesion of sister copies of the oriC-close region was not observed in mukB null mutant cells, suggesting that MukB might be involved in the chromosome cohesion...
  47. ncbi The aerobactin iron transport system genes in Shigella flexneri are present within a pathogenicity island
    S A Vokes
    Department of Microbiology and Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 1095, USA
    Mol Microbiol 33:63-73. 1999
    ..flexneri and S. sonnei and in a different chromosomal location in S. boydii and some E. coli suggests that these virulence-enhancing genes are mobile, and they may constitute an island within an island in S. flexneri...
  48. ncbi Chromosome segregation control by Escherichia coli ObgE GTPase
    James J Foti
    Department of Biology and Rosenstiel Basic Medical Sciences Research Center, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02454 9110, USA
    Mol Microbiol 65:569-81. 2007
    ..Depletion of ObgE did not cause lethality, and cells recovered fully after expression of ObgE was restored. We propose a model in which ObgE is required to license chromosome segregation and subsequent cell cycle events...
  49. pmc Natural selection, infectious transfer and the existence conditions for bacterial plasmids
    C T Bergstrom
    Department of Biology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA
    Genetics 155:1505-19. 2000
    ..Second, plasmids may persist because of their ability to shuttle intermittently favored genes back and forth between various (noncompeting) bacterial strains, ecotypes, or even species...
  50. ncbi Genome sequence of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague
    J Parkhill
    The Sanger Centre, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK
    Nature 413:523-7. 2001
    ..The evidence of ongoing genome fluidity, expansion and decay suggests Y. pestis is a pathogen that has undergone large-scale genetic flux and provides a unique insight into the ways in which new and highly virulent pathogens evolve...
  51. pmc Transcriptional regulation shapes the organization of genes on bacterial chromosomes
    Sarath Chandra Janga
    MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH, UK
    Nucleic Acids Res 37:3680-8. 2009
    ....
  52. ncbi Mosaic bacterial chromosomes: a challenge en route to a tree of genomes
    W Martin
    Institut fur Genetik, Technische Universitat Braunschweig, Federal Republic of Germany
    Bioessays 21:99-104. 1999
    ..They tend to suggest that a search should be on to identify principles that might ultimately govern gene distribution patterns across prokaryotic genomes...
  53. pmc N6-methyl-adenine: an epigenetic signal for DNA-protein interactions
    Didier Wion
    INSERM U318, CHU Michallon, Universite Joseph Fourier, 38043 Grenoble, France
    Nat Rev Microbiol 4:183-92. 2006
    ..In alpha-proteobacteria, CcrM methylation regulates the cell cycle in Caulobacter, Rhizobium and Agrobacterium, and has a role in Brucella abortus infection...
  54. pmc DNA sampling: a method for probing protein binding at specific loci on bacterial chromosomes
    Matej Butala
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Nucleic Acids Res 37:e37. 2009
    ..We illustrate the method by investigating the proteins bound to the colicin K gene regulatory region, either before or after induction of the colicin K gene promoter...
  55. ncbi Soil to genomics: the Streptomyces chromosome
    David A Hopwood
    Department of Molecular Microbiology, John Innes Centre, Colney, Norwich, NR4 7UH, United Kingdom
    Annu Rev Genet 40:1-23. 2006
    ..Chromosome partition into prespore compartments of the aerial mycelium is controlled in part by actin- and tubulin-like proteins, resembling MreB and FtsZ of other bacteria...
  56. pmc Modulation of Escherichia coli sister chromosome cohesion by topoisomerase IV
    Xindan Wang
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QU, United Kingdom
    Genes Dev 22:2426-33. 2008
    ..Therefore, we propose that precatenanes, which form as replication progresses by interwinding of newly replicated sister chromosomes, are responsible for E. coli sister chromosome cohesion...
  57. ncbi Distinct replication requirements for the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes
    Elizabeth S Egan
    Departments of Microbiology, Medicine, and Genetics, Tufts University School of Medicine and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111, USA
    Cell 114:521-30. 2003
    ..Our studies of replication in V. cholerae indicate that microorganisms having multiple chromosomes may utilize unique mechanisms for the control of replication...
  58. pmc Fundamental structural units of the Escherichia coli nucleoid revealed by atomic force microscopy
    Joongbaek Kim
    Laboratory of Plasma Membrane and Nuclear Signaling, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto 606 8502, Japan
    Nucleic Acids Res 32:1982-92. 2004
    ..Mutant analysis demonstrated that these tight compactions of the nucleoid required a protein, Dps. From these results and previously available information, we propose a structural model of the E.coli nucleoid...
  59. pmc A conserved anti-repressor controls horizontal gene transfer by proteolysis
    Baundauna Bose
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Mol Microbiol 70:570-82. 2008
    ..subtilis phage phi105 is required for inactivation of the phi105 repressor (an ImmR homologue). ImmA-dependent proteolysis of ImmR repressors may be a conserved mechanism for regulating horizontal gene transfer...
  60. ncbi Evolution of the terminal regions of the Streptomyces linear chromosome
    Frédéric Choulet
    Laboratoire de Génétique et Microbiologie, UMR INRA 1128, IFR 110, Universite Henri Poincare Nancy 1, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France
    Mol Biol Evol 23:2361-9. 2006
    ..e., chromosome compartmentalization) and generating a fast gene turnover for strong adaptation capabilities...
  61. ncbi The Escherichia coli chromosome is organized with the left and right chromosome arms in separate cell halves
    Henrik J Nielsen
    BioCentrum DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK 2800 Kgs Lyngby, Denmark
    Mol Microbiol 62:331-8. 2006
    ..The relative orientation of the two reorganized nucleoids in pre-division cells is not random. Approximately 80% of dividing cells have their nucleoids oriented in a tandem configuration...
  62. pmc Analyzing genomes with cumulative skew diagrams
    A Grigoriev
    Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Ihnestrasse 73, 14195 Berlin, Germany
    Nucleic Acids Res 26:2286-90. 1998
    ..Analysis of the diagrams of viral and mitochondrial genomes suggests a link between the base composition bias and the time spent by DNA in a single stranded state during replication...
  63. pmc The missing link: Bordetella petrii is endowed with both the metabolic versatility of environmental bacteria and virulence traits of pathogenic Bordetellae
    Roy Gross
    Chair of Microbiology, Biocenter, University of Wurzburg, Am Hubland, D 97074 Wurzburg, Germany
    BMC Genomics 9:449. 2008
    ..Recently, clinical isolates associated with bone degenerative disease or cystic fibrosis have also been described...
  64. pmc Instability of pathogenicity islands in uropathogenic Escherichia coli 536
    Barbara Middendorf
    Institut für Molekulare Infektionsbiologie, Universitat Wurzburg, 97070 Wurzburg, Germany
    J Bacteriol 186:3086-96. 2004
    ..Such extrachromosomal derivatives of PAI II536 and PAI III536 were detected by a specific PCR assay. Our data indicate that the genome content of uropathogenic E. coli can be modulated by deletion of PAIs...
  65. pmc A genomic island in Pseudomonas aeruginosa carries the determinants of flagellin glycosylation
    S K Arora
    Department of Medicine/Infectious Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:9342-7. 2001
    ....
  66. pmc Fast, easy and efficient: site-specific insertion of transgenes into enterobacterial chromosomes using Tn7 without need for selection of the insertion event
    Gregory J McKenzie
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    BMC Microbiol 6:39. 2006
    Inserting transgenes into bacterial chromosomes is generally quite involved, requiring a selection for cells carrying the insertion, usually for drug-resistance, or multiple cumbersome manipulations, or both...
  67. pmc Control of Escherichia coli superoxide dismutase (sodA and sodB) genes by the ferric uptake regulation (fur) locus
    E C Niederhoffer
    Isotope and Structural Chemistry Group INC 4, Los Alamos, National Laboratory, New Mexico 87545
    J Bacteriol 172:1930-8. 1990
    ..Nevertheless, the sodB gene also appears to be part of the iron uptake regulon but not in the classical manner of Fe-dependent repression...
  68. pmc Antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a paradigm of adaptive power
    Herminia De Lencastre
    Laboratory of Microbiology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA
    Curr Opin Microbiol 10:428-35. 2007
    ..Then, in the late 1990s, just as effective hygienic and antibiotic use policies managed to bring down the frequency of MRSA in hospitals of several countries, MRSA strains began to show up in the community...
  69. ncbi The Salmonella genomic island 1 is an integrative mobilizable element
    Benoit Doublet
    Unité BioAgresseurs, santé, Environnement, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, 37380 Nouzilly, France
    Mol Microbiol 55:1911-24. 2005
    ..enterica and E. coli chromosome. SGI1 appeared to be transmissible only in the presence of additional conjugative functions provided in trans. SGI1 can thus be classified within the group of integrative mobilizable elements (IMEs)...
  70. pmc Diversity of genome structure in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi populations
    Sushma Kothapalli
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary T2N 1N4, Canada
    J Bacteriol 187:2638-50. 2005
    ..The phage types were determined, and the origins of the phage types appeared to be independent of the origins of the genome types...
  71. pmc Comparative genomics of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains Ty2 and CT18
    Wen Deng
    Laboratory of Genetics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA
    J Bacteriol 185:2330-7. 2003
    ..The two strains exhibit differences in prophages, insertion sequences, and island structures. While CT18 carries two plasmids, one conferring multiple drug resistance, Ty2 has no plasmids and is sensitive to antibiotics...
  72. ncbi The genome of the natural genetic engineer Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58
    D W Wood
    Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357242, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
    Science 294:2317-23. 2001
    ..Availability of the A. tumefaciens sequence will facilitate investigations into the molecular basis of pathogenesis and the evolutionary divergence of pathogenic and symbiotic lifestyles...
  73. pmc Segregation of the replication terminus of the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes
    Preeti Srivastava
    Laboratory of Biochemistry, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 4255, USA
    J Bacteriol 188:1060-70. 2006
    ..It appears that there could be coordination between the two chromosomes through the replication and/or segregation of the terminus region to ensure their segregation to daughter cells...
  74. ncbi Single-particle tracking of oriC-GFP fluorescent spots during chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli
    Steven Elmore
    Section Molecular Cytology, Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences, BioCentrum Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 316, 1098 SM Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    J Struct Biol 151:275-87. 2005
    ..We conclude from the analysis that within the experimental accuracy--the limits of which are indicated and discussed--there is no evidence that spot segregation requires any other mechanism than that of cell (length) growth...
  75. ncbi Order and disorder in bacterial genomes
    Eduardo P C Rocha
    Unité Génétique des Génomes Bactériens, Institut Pasteur, 28 rue du Dr Roux, 75724 Paris Cedex 15, France
    Curr Opin Microbiol 7:519-27. 2004
    ..Nevertheless, recent genome comparisons and experimental work highlighted the fluidity of bacterial chromosomes, including genome rearrangements that imperil the selective features of chromosome order...
  76. pmc Partitioning of the linear chromosome during sporulation of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) involves an oriC-linked parAB locus
    H J Kim
    John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UH, United Kingdom
    J Bacteriol 182:1313-20. 2000
    ..C.-H. Lin and A. D. Grossman, Cell 92:675-685, 1998). One of these sites encompassed the transcription start point of the stronger parA promoter...
  77. pmc A factor that positively regulates cell division by activating transcription of the major cluster of essential cell division genes of Escherichia coli
    X D Wang
    Department of Microbiology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington 06032
    EMBO J 10:3363-72. 1991
    ..The sdiA gene product is the first factor thus far identified that specifically regulates expression of this key group of cell division genes...
  78. ncbi A panel of Tn7-based vectors for insertion of the gfp marker gene or for delivery of cloned DNA into Gram-negative bacteria at a neutral chromosomal site
    B Koch
    Section of Genetics and Microbiology, Department of Ecology, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 C, Frederiksberg, Denmark
    J Microbiol Methods 45:187-95. 2001
    ..The system allowed detection of gfp-tagged cells in the barley rhizosphere, while expression of the Tn5-tagged locus could be determined by measuring bioluminescence...
  79. pmc Fully efficient chromosome dimer resolution in Escherichia coli cells lacking the integral membrane domain of FtsK
    Nelly Dubarry
    CNRS, Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, Gif sur Yvette, France
    EMBO J 29:597-605. 2010
    ..We propose therefore that FtsK transports DNA before membrane fusion, at a time when there is still an opening in the constricted septum...
  80. pmc Excess SeqA prolongs sequestration of oriC and delays nucleoid segregation and cell division
    Trond Bach
    Department of Cell Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, 0310 Oslo, Norway
    EMBO J 22:315-23. 2003
    ..These results suggest that SeqA's function in regulation of replication initiation is linked to chromosome segregation and possibly cell division...
  81. pmc Using Mahalanobis distance to compare genomic signatures between bacterial plasmids and chromosomes
    Haruo Suzuki
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 36:e147. 2008
    ..has been commonly used to measure differences in dinucleotide composition, or 'genomic signature', between bacterial chromosomes and plasmids...
  82. ncbi Two essential DNA polymerases at the bacterial replication fork
    E Dervyn
    , Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Jouy-en-Josas, 78352 Cedex, France
    Science 294:1716-9. 2001
    ..subtilis and in many other bacteria that contain both polC and dnaE genes...
  83. pmc Surveying a supercoil domain by using the gamma delta resolution system in Salmonella typhimurium
    N P Higgins
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 35294 2170, USA
    J Bacteriol 178:2825-35. 1996
    A genetic system was developed to investigate the supercoil structure of bacterial chromosomes. New res-carrying transposons were derived from MudI1734 (MudJr1 and MudJr2) and Tn10 (Tn10dGn)...
  84. ncbi The diverse and dynamic structure of bacterial genomes
    S Casjens
    Department of Oncological Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84132, USA
    Annu Rev Genet 32:339-77. 1998
    ..gel electrophoretic technology have facilitated the construction of complete and accurate physical maps of bacterial chromosomes, and the many maps constructed in the past decade have revealed unexpected and substantial differences in ..
  85. ncbi A genomic view of the human-Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron symbiosis
    Jian Xu
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Science 299:2074-6. 2003
    ..These and other expanded paralogous groups shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying symbiotic host-bacterial relationships in our intestine...
  86. pmc Mosaic genes and mosaic chromosomes: intra- and interspecies genomic variation of Streptococcus pneumoniae
    R Hakenbeck
    Universitat Kaiserslautern, D 67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany
    Infect Immun 69:2477-86. 2001
    ....
  87. ncbi Characterization of XerC- and XerD-dependent CTX phage integration in Vibrio cholerae
    Sarah M McLeod
    Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, Tufts University School of Medicine and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA 02111, USA
    Mol Microbiol 54:935-47. 2004
    ....
  88. pmc Interstrain transfer of the large pathogenicity island (PAPI-1) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa
    Xiaoyun Qiu
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:19830-5. 2006
    ..Together with the virulence determinants, PAPI-1 plays an important role in the evolution of P. aeruginosa, by expanding its natural habitat from soil and water to animal and human infections...
  89. pmc Transcriptional inactivation of a regulatory site for replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome II
    Tatiana Venkova-Canova
    Laboratory of Biochemistry, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 4260, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:12051-6. 2006
    ..RctB, in turn, repressed the rctA promoter and, thereby, could control its own titration by modulating the transcription of rctA. This control circuit appears to be a putative novel mechanism for homeostasis of initiator availability...
  90. pmc Characterization of a prokaryotic SMC protein involved in chromosome partitioning
    R A Britton
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Genes Dev 12:1254-9. 1998
    ..Our results demonstrate that the B. subtilis Smc protein, like its eukaryotic counterpart, plays an important role in chromosome structure and partitioning...
  91. pmc Telomere exchange between linear replicons of Borrelia burgdorferi
    Wai Mun Huang
    Department of Pathology, University of Utah Medical School, Salt Lake City, Utah 84132, USA
    J Bacteriol 186:4134-41. 2004
    ..The unusual nonhomologous nature of this rearrangement suggests that, barring horizontal transfer, it can be used as a unique genetic marker for this lineage of B. burgdorferi chromosomes...
  92. ncbi Neisseria gonorrhoeae secretes chromosomal DNA via a novel type IV secretion system
    Holly L Hamilton
    Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Wisconsin Madison Medical School, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Mol Microbiol 55:1704-21. 2005
    ..gonorrhoeae secretes DNA via a specific process. Donated DNA may be used in natural transformation, contributing to antigenic variation and the spread of antibiotic resistance, and it may modulate the host immune response...
  93. pmc A genome-scale analysis for identification of genes required for growth or survival of Haemophilus influenzae
    Brian J Akerley
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:966-71. 2002
    ..This genome-scale phenotypic analysis identifies potential roles for a large set of genes of unknown function...
  94. ncbi Regulation of the initiation of chromosomal replication in bacteria
    Jolanta Zakrzewska-Czerwinska
    Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wrocław, Poland
    FEMS Microbiol Rev 31:378-87. 2007
    ..This review summarizes recent research into the regulatory mechanisms of the initiation of chromosomal replication in bacteria, with emphasis on organisms other than E. coli...
  95. ncbi Selection for chromosome architecture in bacteria
    Heather Hendrickson
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
    J Mol Evol 62:615-29. 2006
    b>Bacterial chromosomes are immense polymers whose faithful replication and segregation are crucial to cell survival...
  96. pmc The Pseudomonas putida Crc global regulator controls the expression of genes from several chromosomal catabolic pathways for aromatic compounds
    Gracia Morales
    Departamento de Biotecnología Microbiana Servicio de Proteómica, Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, CSIC, Campus de la Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain
    J Bacteriol 186:1337-44. 2004
    ..These results expand the influence of Crc to pathways used to assimilate several aromatic compounds, which highlights its importance as a master regulator of carbon metabolism in P. putida...
  97. pmc Genome sequence of Synechococcus CC9311: Insights into adaptation to a coastal environment
    Brian Palenik
    Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:13555-9. 2006
    ..In addition, the types of potentially horizontally transferred genes are markedly different between the coastal and open ocean genomes and suggest a more prominent role for phages in horizontal gene transfer in oligotrophic environments...
  98. pmc spo0J is required for normal chromosome segregation as well as the initiation of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis
    K Ireton
    Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02139
    J Bacteriol 176:5320-9. 1994
    ..The dual functions of Spo0J could provide a mechanism for regulating the initiation of sporulation in response to activity of the chromosome partition machinery...
  99. ncbi In vitro assembly of a prepriming complex at the origin of the Escherichia coli chromosome
    B E Funnell
    J Biol Chem 262:10327-34. 1987
    ..Thus, a complex structure, involving multiple proteins and a large region of DNA, must be formed at the origin to prepare the template for priming and replication...
  100. ncbi Prokaryotic chromosomes and disease
    Jörg Hacker
    Institut für Molekulare Infektionsbiologie, Universitat Wurzburg, Rontgenring 11, 97070 Wurzburg, Germany
    Science 301:790-3. 2003
    ..Here, we will show that various processes of genomic instability have an influence on the many manifestations of infectious disease...
  101. ncbi Construction and analysis of chromosomal Clostridium difficile mutants
    Jennifer R O'Connor
    Australian Bacterial Pathogenesis Program, Department of Microbiology, Monash University, VIC 3800, Australia
    Mol Microbiol 61:1335-51. 2006
    ..The development of this methodology will significantly enhance our ability to use molecular approaches to develop a greater understanding of the ability of C. difficile to cause disease...

Research Grants62

  1. Variation in M. tuberculosis in response to host selection
    Sarah Fortune; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..In these studies, we expect to provide fundamental insights into the mechanisms and targets of diversifying immune selection in M. tuberculosis. ..
  2. Development of transformed lactobacilli as a microbicide
    Richard B Markham; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  3. Listeria-Based Therapeutic Cancer Vaccine for Melanoma
    Dirk G Brockstedt; Fiscal Year: 2011
    ..The overall goal of this proposal is to develop a therapeutic vaccine for melanoma that is based on inactivated strains of recombinant Listeria monocytogenes expressing melanoma-associated antigens. ..
  4. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance
    George A Jacoby; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..Under Specific Aim 3, we propose to explore Qnr/gyrase interaction as revealed by isothermal titration calorimetry or surface plasmon resonance and by x- ray crystallography. ..
  5. Topoisomerases and Chromosome Segregation
    Kenneth J Marians; Fiscal Year: 2012
    ..in this process? What is the nature of the coupling between cell division and the condensation state of the nucleoid? And, do RecQ and Topo III support an alternate pathway of sister chromosome decatenation in vivo? ..
  6. Effects of the nucleoid protein H-NS on RNAP elongation
    Matthew V Kotlajich; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..Understanding the effect that H-NS has on an elongating RNAP could provide a new therapeutic avenue to combat pathogenic enterobacteria or the spread of antibiotic resistance genes [54]. ..
  7. Dynamics and regulation of sister chromosome cohesion in E. coli.
    David Bates; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..chromosome cohesion in bacteria, to determine what role cohesion plays in maintenance and organization of bacterial chromosomes, and to develop a general model for bacterial chromosome segregation...
  8. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPE
    William S Talbot; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Orius SC1000B camera. ..
  9. Mechanisms of Gonococcal Pilin Antigenic and Phase Variation
    Hank S Seifert; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ....
  10. MECHANISM, ACTIVATION, AND CONTROL OF RRNA TRANSCRIPTION
    Richard L Gourse; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..coli makes a structure analogous to the eukaryotic nucleolus. We will expand these studies to explore other potential long-range interactions between distant parts of the bacterial chromosome. ..
  11. Chromosome Dynamics in Bacillus subtilis
    David Z Rudner; Fiscal Year: 2012
    ..2) Determine how the SpoIIIE translocase functions at the division to septum to transport unsegregated DNA. 3) Investigate how replication initiation and origin segregation are linked upon entry into sporulation. ..
  12. CONJUGAL TRANSFER OF BACTERIODES ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCES
    Abigail A Salyers; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  13. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF BACTERIAL CHROMOSOME STRUCTURE
    John R Roth; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ....
  14. Immunotherapeutic minicells for use in intermediate and high-risk non-muscle inva
    ROGER ALLEN SABBADINI; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..Vaxiion's minicells are well suited for the job because they lack bacterial chromosomes and are non-living, and therefore may provide the immunomodulatory benefits of BCG without viability-..
  15. VIRULENCE IN COXIELLA BURNETTII
    HERBERT THOMPSON; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..Individual genes then suspected to be important for virulence will be studied by knockout mutations. The proposed experiments are the first to examine C. burnetii by genetic transformation. ..
  16. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND VIRULENCE OF CTX PHAGE
    Matthew Waldor; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..In addition, they may reveal ways in which changes in phage gene expression or copy number can contribute to the pathogenicity of V. cholerae. ..
  17. Structure and activity of Escherichia coli chromosome
    Arkady Khodursky; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..abstract_text> ..
  18. FUNCTION OF INITIATION FACTORS IN BACTERIAL TRANSLATION
    JOHN HERSHEY; Fiscal Year: 1992
    ..The studies should result in an increase in our knowledge of the initiation process, which is essential for understanding mechanisms of protein synthesis and translational control at the molecular level...
  19. Hand-Held System to Detect Anthrax Spores in Bio-defense
    BERTRAND LEMIEUX; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..This fully automated "sample-to-answer" system will enable minimally trained operators to perform sophisticated nucleic acid tests in the field. ..
  20. MRSA as a community organism.
    Jose Eguia; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..abstract_text> ..
  21. Regulation of DnaA and replication initiation in Bacillus subtilis
    RICHARD WEART; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  22. WORKSHOP--SITE-SPECIFIC RECOMBINATION & TRANSPORTATION
    Nancy Kleckner; Fiscal Year: 1990
    ..of cancer, generation of antibody diversity, transmission of antibiotic resistance genes, rearrangement of bacterial chromosomes, and mobility of eukaryotic introns...
  23. RNA LIGASE FUNCTION AND USE IN DNA SYNTHESIS
    Michael Botchan; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ....
  24. CELL DIVISION GENE PRODUCTS OF BACILLUS SUBTILIS
    George Stewart; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..subtilis. The roles of the MreB, MreC, and MreD proteins in the division process will be studied. Through the isolation of suppressor mutations, proteins which interact with the Mre proteins will be identified. ..
  25. Mechanisms controlling the dynamic structure of the bacterial chromosome
    MONICA SCHWARTZ; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..abstract_text> ..
  26. CANAVAN DISEASE PATHOGENESIS AND TREATMENT
    Aryan Namboodiri; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ....
  27. Role of Msr in Oxidative Stres in S. aureus
    RADHESHYAM JAYASWAL; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..The results of the proposed studies are expected to provide detailed understanding of the MsrA in staphylococcal physiology and pathogenesis. ..
  28. Structure and function of the prokaryotic cytoskeleton by electron cryotomography
    Grant J Jensen; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..This will include optimizing and refining strategies for collecting dual-axis tilt-series of frozen-hydrated cells as well as development of software to optimally merge the images into a three-dimensional reconstruction. ..
  29. FUNCTION OF THE TERMINUS REGION OF THE CHROMOSOME
    PETER KUEMPEL; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..He will also determine why dif mutants have an elongated interval between termination and cell division (D period), even in cells that are apparently growing normally. This provides a system for studying chromosome partitioning. ..
  30. DNAA PROTEIN AND REPLICATION INITIATION IN MYCOBACTE
    Malini Rajagopalan; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..Replication of bacterial chromosomes occurs at unique sequences called 'oriC' and is thought to be regulated at the level of initiation...
  31. TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND ORAL CAVITY CANCER
    Milton Marshall; Fiscal Year: 1991
    ..drug resistance genes are present in much higher copy number than they could be if they were located on bacterial chromosomes. In mammalian cells, the presence of c-myc, and a drug resistance gene on episomes has been established in ..
  32. Technologies for the rapid engineering of bacterial chromosomes with synthetic DN
    JAMES KEALEY; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..is to develop enabling technology for the synthesis of long DNA sequences and for their insertion into bacterial chromosomes with concomitant replacement or deletion of unwanted or unneeded host DNA...
  33. Spatial-temporal Regulation of the Asymmetric Cell Cycle
    Michael Fero; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..abstract_text> ..
  34. ANALYSIS OF THE ESSENTIAL GENES OF E COLI
    Douglas Berg; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ....
  35. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF BACTERIAL LUCIFERASE
    Timothy Johnston; Fiscal Year: 1991
    ..The mutant luxA genes will be amplified out of the bacterial chromosomes by Polymerase Chain Reaction and cloned into a phagemid vector carrying a wildtype luxB gene...
  36. BIOCHEMISTRY OF SULFONIUM COMPOUNDS
    RONALD GREENE; Fiscal Year: 1980
    ..When we have completed this work we plan to sequence selected portions of the DNA, paying special attention to the control regions preceeding the coding sequences for the structural genes. ..
  37. Structure/function of the primosome in DNA replication
    Matthew Lopper; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  38. Chromosome segregation and dynamics in Vibrio cholerae
    Aretha Fiebig; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..This work will make important contributions to our understanding of bacterial chromosome segregation and the biology of V. cholerae, an important human pathogen. ..
  39. MECHANISMS OF DNA REPLICATION
    Kenneth J Marians; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..abstract_text> ..
  40. Examination of Salmonella chromosome structure
    SAMANTHA ORCHARD; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Additionally, new antibacterial targets may be identified. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  41. Base Pair Opening in the Origin of DNA Replication
    IRINA RUSSU; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..These high-resolution energetic maps will contribute to the understanding of the fundamental relationships between base sequence and local stability in DNA double helices. ..
  42. In vitro selection of nicotinamide-binding peptides
    SHEREF MANSY; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Such progressions may ultimately allow for the generation of synthetic pathways that could either be inserted into bacterial chromosomes or encapsulated in artificial membranes.
  43. Genome Erosion in Infectious Microorganisms
    Howard Ochman; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..abstract_text> ..
  44. Elucidating the origins and functions of unknown genes
    Howard Ochman; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..By combining experimental and bioinformatic approaches, the present proposal will analyze the origins, functions and structural properties of ORFans, and how they have assumed key roles in cellular function. ..
  45. MOLECULAR/GENETIC ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL CLOCKS IN CELLS
    Carl Johnson; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Downstream events in the transduction of entraining signals will be studied in mammalian cells (CREB/CBP, cADPR) and model systems (cADPR, ZGT gene) to characterize the phase-resetting pathway. ..
  46. Genome Sequencing of Toxoplasma gondii
    Ian Paulsen; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..gondii research community is solidly behind this effort, and the history of this group (in supporting and successfully exploiting the T. gondii EST project, for example) bodes well for successful utilization of the genomic sequence...
  47. MOLECULAR/GENETIC ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL CLOCKS
    Carl Johnson; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..The long-term research goal is to understand the mechanism of this fascinating clockwork. ..
  48. Cell-permeant Clock Proteins
    Carl Johnson; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..abstract_text> ..
  49. Novel Targets for Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa
    Philip Lister; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  50. Novel ratiometric luminescence reporters for intracellular free calcium
    Carl Johnson; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..As a test case, these probes will be applied to the topic of biological clocks that have an important influence over mental and physical health. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  51. Screening for Chronotherapeutics Applied to Hypersomnia and Other Sleep Disorders
    Carl Johnson; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  52. Toxin Gene Deleted C. perfringens as an Oral Delivery Vector
    Yue Chen; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Successful completion of this study will create a safe, low-cost and efficient oral delivery vector for vaccine and therapeutic agents. [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  53. E. coli Annotation Workshop
    Monica Riley; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..coli information as it is fragmented into several databases with different objectives and there is contradictions.The output of a workshop and a follow-up smaller meeting will meet and solve this serious problem. ..
  54. Tetrahymena Genome Sequencing Project
    Jonathan Eisen; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ....
  55. BRET Interaction System for Circadian Clock Proteins
    Carl Johnson; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Our hypothesis is that clock protein interaction will not be simply a function of the protein abundance, but that there will be phase-specific interaction regulated by other factors than merely the proteins' abundance. ..
  56. Gain and loss of the gonococcal genetic island in Neisseria
    JOSEPH DILLARD; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..meningitidis strains. These studies will further characterize the gene content of the N. meningitidis GGIs and examine their effects on infection of human cells in culture. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  57. CHARACTERIZATION OF MAPPED HUMAN BAC CLONES
    Vivian Cheung; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..In the process of characterizing the clones, we will also get information that gives us insight into the concordance rate between RH map, genome sequence map and cytogenetic map. ..
  58. DNA packaging and delivery by dsDNA viruses
    Sherwood Casjens; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..The aims of the project will be pursued through a combination of genetic, biochemical, biophysical and structural analysis strategies. ..