nucleic acid repetitive sequences

Summary

Summary: Sequences of DNA or RNA that occur in multiple copies. There are several types: INTERSPERSED REPETITIVE SEQUENCES are copies of transposable elements (DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS or RETROELEMENTS) dispersed throughout the genome. TERMINAL REPEAT SEQUENCES flank both ends of another sequence, for example, the long terminal repeats (LTRs) on RETROVIRUSES. Variations may be direct repeats, those occurring in the same direction, or inverted repeats, those opposite to each other in direction. TANDEM REPEAT SEQUENCES are copies which lie adjacent to each other, direct or inverted.

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome
    E S Lander
    Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Center for Genome Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA
    Nature 409:860-921. 2001
  2. ncbi Repbase Update, a database of eukaryotic repetitive elements
    J Jurka
    Genetic Information Research Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA
    Cytogenet Genome Res 110:462-7. 2005
  3. ncbi Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome
    Robert H Waterston
    Genome Sequencing Center, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8501, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA
    Nature 420:520-62. 2002
  4. ncbi De novo identification of repeat families in large genomes
    Alkes L Price
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093 0114, USA
    Bioinformatics 21:i351-8. 2005
  5. pmc A guild of 45 CRISPR-associated (Cas) protein families and multiple CRISPR/Cas subtypes exist in prokaryotic genomes
    Daniel H Haft
    The Institute for Genomic Research, Rockville, Maryland, USA
    PLoS Comput Biol 1:e60. 2005
  6. ncbi Crystal structure of parallel quadruplexes from human telomeric DNA
    Gary N Parkinson
    The Cancer Research UK Biomolecular Structure Unit, Chester Beatty Laboratories, The Institute of Cancer Research, 237 Fulham Road, London SW3 6JB, UK
    Nature 417:876-80. 2002
  7. ncbi The sequence of the human genome
    J C Venter
    Celera Genomics, 45 West Gude Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
    Science 291:1304-51. 2001
  8. pmc REPuter: the manifold applications of repeat analysis on a genomic scale
    S Kurtz
    Faculty of Technology, University of Bielefeld, PO Box 10 01 31, D 33501 Bielefeld, Germany
    Nucleic Acids Res 29:4633-42. 2001
  9. ncbi Intervening sequences of regularly spaced prokaryotic repeats derive from foreign genetic elements
    Francisco J M Mojica
    Divisón de Microbiología, Departamento de Fisiologia, Genética y Microbiología, Universidad de Alicante, Campus de San Vicente, E 03080, Spain
    J Mol Evol 60:174-82. 2005
  10. ncbi Clustered regularly interspaced short palindrome repeats (CRISPRs) have spacers of extrachromosomal origin
    Alexander Bolotin
    Génétique Microbienne, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Jouy en Josas, France
    Microbiology 151:2551-61. 2005

Research Grants

  1. The Environment and Epigenome: Interplay of Toxicants and Transposons in Mammals
    CHRISTOPHER DON FAULK; Fiscal Year: 2013
  2. Understanding the Mechanism of RNA Interference
    Phillip D Zamore; Fiscal Year: 2013
  3. GENE EXPRESSION IN AGING AND DEVELOPMENT
    WOODRING ERIK WRIGHT; Fiscal Year: 2012
  4. Testing the Hypothesis of Somatic Cell Retrotransposition in Human Brain
    DOUGLAS FREDERICK LEVINSON; Fiscal Year: 2013
  5. Allele-Selective Inhibitors for Expanded Trinucleotide Repeat Genes
    David R Corey; Fiscal Year: 2013
  6. Stable Maintenance of an Extrachromosomal Selfish DNA Element
    Makkuni Jayaram; Fiscal Year: 2010
  7. Mechanisms of biogenesis of atypical alphaviruses
    RAMASAMY RAJU; Fiscal Year: 2011
  8. Language Development in Fragile X Syndrome
    LEONARD J ABBEDUTO; Fiscal Year: 2013
  9. MECHANISMS OF DSRNA-INDUCED GENE SILENCING
    Gregory J Hannon; Fiscal Year: 2012
  10. TRYPANASOMA CRUZI GENOME-SBRI
    Kenneth Stuart; Fiscal Year: 2004

Detail Information

Publications351 found, 100 shown here

  1. ncbi Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome
    E S Lander
    Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Center for Genome Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA
    Nature 409:860-921. 2001
    ..We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence...
  2. ncbi Repbase Update, a database of eukaryotic repetitive elements
    J Jurka
    Genetic Information Research Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA
    Cytogenet Genome Res 110:462-7. 2005
    ..Sequences from Repbase Update are used to screen and annotate repetitive elements using programs such as Censor and RepeatMasker. Repbase Update is available on the worldwide web at http://www.girinst.org/Repbase_Update.html...
  3. ncbi Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome
    Robert H Waterston
    Genome Sequencing Center, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8501, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA
    Nature 420:520-62. 2002
    ....
  4. ncbi De novo identification of repeat families in large genomes
    Alkes L Price
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093 0114, USA
    Bioinformatics 21:i351-8. 2005
    ..We develop a new method for de novo identification of repeat families via extension of consensus seeds; our method enables a rigorous definition of repeat boundaries, a key issue in repeat analysis...
  5. pmc A guild of 45 CRISPR-associated (Cas) protein families and multiple CRISPR/Cas subtypes exist in prokaryotic genomes
    Daniel H Haft
    The Institute for Genomic Research, Rockville, Maryland, USA
    PLoS Comput Biol 1:e60. 2005
    ..It is evident from this analysis that CRISPR/cas loci are larger, more complex, and more heterogeneous than previously appreciated...
  6. ncbi Crystal structure of parallel quadruplexes from human telomeric DNA
    Gary N Parkinson
    The Cancer Research UK Biomolecular Structure Unit, Chester Beatty Laboratories, The Institute of Cancer Research, 237 Fulham Road, London SW3 6JB, UK
    Nature 417:876-80. 2002
    ..This DNA structure suggests a straightforward path for telomere folding and unfolding, as well as ways in which it can recognize telomere-associated proteins...
  7. ncbi The sequence of the human genome
    J C Venter
    Celera Genomics, 45 West Gude Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
    Science 291:1304-51. 2001
    ..Less than 1% of all SNPs resulted in variation in proteins, but the task of determining which SNPs have functional consequences remains an open challenge...
  8. pmc REPuter: the manifold applications of repeat analysis on a genomic scale
    S Kurtz
    Faculty of Technology, University of Bielefeld, PO Box 10 01 31, D 33501 Bielefeld, Germany
    Nucleic Acids Res 29:4633-42. 2001
    ....
  9. ncbi Intervening sequences of regularly spaced prokaryotic repeats derive from foreign genetic elements
    Francisco J M Mojica
    Divisón de Microbiología, Departamento de Fisiologia, Genética y Microbiología, Universidad de Alicante, Campus de San Vicente, E 03080, Spain
    J Mol Evol 60:174-82. 2005
    ..All these biological traits could be influenced by the presence of specific spacers. CRISPR loci can be visualized as mosaics of a repeated unit, separated by sequences at some time present elsewhere in the cell...
  10. ncbi Clustered regularly interspaced short palindrome repeats (CRISPRs) have spacers of extrachromosomal origin
    Alexander Bolotin
    Génétique Microbienne, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Jouy en Josas, France
    Microbiology 151:2551-61. 2005
    ..The presence of gene fragments in CRISPR structures and the nuclease motifs in cas genes of both cluster types suggests that CRISPR formation involves a DNA degradation step...
  11. ncbi Identification of genes that are associated with DNA repeats in prokaryotes
    Ruud Jansen
    Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Bacteriology Division, Veterinary Faculty, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 1, 3584 CL Utrecht, The Netherlands
    Mol Microbiol 43:1565-75. 2002
    ..The spatial coherence of CRISPR and cas genes may stimulate new research on the genesis and biological role of these repeats and genes...
  12. pmc Annotation, submission and screening of repetitive elements in Repbase: RepbaseSubmitter and Censor
    Oleksiy Kohany
    Genetic Information Research Institute, 1925 Landings Drive, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA
    BMC Bioinformatics 7:474. 2006
    ..Updating and maintenance of the database requires specialized tools, which we have created and made available for use with Repbase, and which may be useful as a template for other curated databases...
  13. pmc Evolutionary conservation of sequence and secondary structures in CRISPR repeats
    Victor Kunin
    DOE Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA 94598, USA
    Genome Biol 8:R61. 2007
    ..It has been recently shown that CRISPR provides acquired resistance against viruses in prokaryotes...
  14. ncbi CRISPR elements in Yersinia pestis acquire new repeats by preferential uptake of bacteriophage DNA, and provide additional tools for evolutionary studies
    C Pourcel
    GPMS, Institut de Genetique et Microbiologie, Universite Paris XI, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France
    Microbiology 151:653-63. 2005
    ..This is believed to be the first time that the origin of the spacers in CRISPR elements has been explained. The CRISPR structure provides a new and robust identification tool...
  15. ncbi A draft sequence of the rice genome (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica)
    Stephen A Goff
    Torrey Mesa Research Institute, Syngenta, 3115 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA
    Science 296:92-100. 2002
    ..Assignment of candidate rice orthologs to Arabidopsis genes is possible in many cases. The rice genome sequence provides a foundation for the improvement of cereals, our most important crops...
  16. ncbi The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Pelargonium x hortorum: organization and evolution of the largest and most highly rearranged chloroplast genome of land plants
    Timothy W Chumley
    The University of Texas at Austin, TX, USA
    Mol Biol Evol 23:2175-90. 2006
    ..We propose simple models that account for the major rearrangements with a minimum of 8 IR boundary changes and 12 inversions in addition to several insertions of duplicated sequence...
  17. ncbi Extensive rearrangements in the chloroplast genome of Trachelium caeruleum are associated with repeats and tRNA genes
    Rosemarie C Haberle
    Section of Integrative Biology and Institute of Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Mol Evol 66:350-61. 2008
    ..Genes for tRNAs occur at many but not all inversion endpoints, so some combination of repeats and tRNA genes may have mediated these rearrangements...
  18. ncbi The Mre11 complex is required for repair of hairpin-capped double-strand breaks and prevention of chromosome rearrangements
    Kirill S Lobachev
    Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA
    Cell 108:183-93. 2002
    ..Our results suggest an additional role for the Mre11 complex in maintaining genome stability...
  19. ncbi Regulation of heterochromatic silencing and histone H3 lysine-9 methylation by RNAi
    Thomas A Volpe
    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Watson School of Biological Sciences, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA
    Science 297:1833-7. 2002
    ..We propose that double-stranded RNA arising from centromeric repeats targets formation and maintenance of heterochromatin through RNAi...
  20. ncbi CRISPR provides acquired resistance against viruses in prokaryotes
    Rodolphe Barrangou
    Danisco USA Inc, 3329 Agriculture Drive, Madison, WI 53716, USA
    Science 315:1709-12. 2007
    ..Thus, CRISPR, together with associated cas genes, provided resistance against phages, and resistance specificity is determined by spacer-phage sequence similarity...
  21. ncbi Complete chloroplast genome sequences from Korean ginseng (Panax schinseng Nees) and comparative analysis of sequence evolution among 17 vascular plants
    Ki Joong Kim
    School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136 701, Korea
    DNA Res 11:247-61. 2004
    ..Large-sized indels were often associated with direct repeats at the end of the sequences facilitating intra-molecular recombination...
  22. ncbi Establishment and maintenance of a heterochromatin domain
    Ira M Hall
    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Post Office Box 100, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA
    Science 297:2232-7. 2002
    ..This work defines sequential requirements for the initiation and propagation of regional heterochromatic domains...
  23. ncbi The genome sequence of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea
    Ralph A Dean
    Center for Integrated Fungal Research, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, USA
    Nature 434:980-6. 2005
    ..The M. grisea genome has been subject to invasion and proliferation of active transposable elements, reflecting the clonal nature of this fungus imposed by widespread rice cultivation...
  24. ncbi The repetitive DNA elements called CRISPRs and their associated genes: evidence of horizontal transfer among prokaryotes
    James S Godde
    Department of Biology, Monmouth College, Monmouth, IL 61462, USA
    J Mol Evol 62:718-29. 2006
    ..We suggest a mechanism by which this HGT has occurred, namely, that the CRISPR loci can be carried between cells on megaplasmids > or = 40 kb in length...
  25. ncbi TRF2 protects human telomeres from end-to-end fusions
    B van Steensel
    The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    Cell 92:401-13. 1998
    ..The results raise the possibility that chromosome end fusions and senescence in primary human cells may be caused by loss by TRF2 from shortened telomeres...
  26. pmc Mouse centric and pericentric satellite repeats form distinct functional heterochromatin
    Mounia Guenatri
    Institut Curie Research section, UMR218 du Centre National pour la Recherche Scientifique, 26 Rue d Ulm, 75248 Paris Cedex 05, France
    J Cell Biol 166:493-505. 2004
    ..Thus, we define functionally independent centromeric subdomains, which spatio-temporal isolation is proposed to be important for centromeric cohesion and dissociation during chromosome segregation...
  27. ncbi The pattern of gene amplification is determined by the chromosomal location of hairpin-capped breaks
    Vidhya Narayanan
    School of Biology and Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    Cell 125:1283-96. 2006
    ..The rules for the palindrome-dependent pathway of gene amplification defined in yeast may operate during the formation of amplicons in human tumors...
  28. pmc Draft genome sequence of the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis
    Jane M Carlton
    Institute for Genomic Research, 9712 Medical Research Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
    Science 315:207-12. 2007
    ..The genome sequence predicts previously unknown functions for the hydrogenosome, which support a common evolutionary origin of this unusual organelle with mitochondria...
  29. ncbi The genome sequence of Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas disease
    Najib M El-Sayed
    Department of Parasite Genomics, Institute for Genomic Research, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
    Science 309:409-15. 2005
    ....
  30. ncbi Ebb and flow of the chloroplast inverted repeat
    S E Goulding
    Department of Genetics, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Ireland
    Mol Gen Genet 252:195-206. 1996
    ..Nicotiana acuminata chloroplast DNA contains a "molecular fossil' of the IR-LSC junction that existed prior to this dramatic rearrangement...
  31. ncbi Phytophthora genome sequences uncover evolutionary origins and mechanisms of pathogenesis
    Brett M Tyler
    Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
    Science 313:1261-6. 2006
    ....
  32. pmc Instability of repetitive DNA sequences: the role of replication in multiple mechanisms
    M Bzymek
    Department of Biology, Brandeis University, 415 South Street, Waltham, MA 02454-9110, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:8319-25. 2001
    ..Replication plays a critical role in the two slipped misalignment mechanisms, and difficulties in replication appear to trigger rearrangements via all these mechanisms...
  33. pmc Microsatellites in different eukaryotic genomes: survey and analysis
    G Toth
    Department of Genetics, Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary
    Genome Res 10:967-81. 2000
    ..Our results suggest that strand-slippage theories alone are insufficient to explain microsatellite distribution in the genome as a whole. Other possible factors contributing to the observed divergence are discussed...
  34. ncbi The genome sequence of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa
    James E Galagan
    Whitehead Institute Center for Genome Research, 320 Charles Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02141, USA
    Nature 422:859-68. 2003
    ..Genome analysis suggests that RIP has had a profound impact on genome evolution, greatly slowing the creation of new genes through genomic duplication and resulting in a genome with an unusually low proportion of closely related genes...
  35. pmc Human telomeric sequence forms a hybrid-type intramolecular G-quadruplex structure with mixed parallel/antiparallel strands in potassium solution
    Attila Ambrus
    College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, 1703 E Mabel St, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 34:2723-35. 2006
    ....
  36. pmc Cooperativity between DNA methyltransferases in the maintenance methylation of repetitive elements
    Gangning Liang
    USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Urology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 9181, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 22:480-91. 2002
    ..Our results reveal a previously unrecognized degree of cooperativity among mammalian DNA methyltransferases in ES cells...
  37. pmc The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome
    Mark T Ross
    The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK
    Nature 434:325-37. 2005
    ..Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence...
  38. ncbi Methods for obtaining and analyzing whole chloroplast genome sequences
    Robert K Jansen
    Section of Integrative Biology, The University of Texas at Austin, Institute of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Austin, Texas 78712 0253, USA
    Methods Enzymol 395:348-84. 2005
    ....
  39. pmc A putative viral defence mechanism in archaeal cells
    Reidun K Lillestøl
    Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Copenhagen, Sølvgade 83H, DK 1307 Copenhagen K, Denmark
    Archaea 2:59-72. 2006
    ..An archaeal database summarizing the data will be maintained at http://dac.molbio.ku.dk/dbs/SRSR/...
  40. ncbi The chloroplast genome sequence of the green alga Pseudendoclonium akinetum (Ulvophyceae) reveals unusual structural features and new insights into the branching order of chlorophyte lineages
    Jean Francois Pombert
    Departement de Biochimie et de Microbiologie, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada
    Mol Biol Evol 22:1903-18. 2005
    ....
  41. ncbi Telomeric repeat containing RNA and RNA surveillance factors at mammalian chromosome ends
    Claus M Azzalin
    Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research ISREC, CH 1066 Epalinges, Switzerland
    Science 318:798-801. 2007
    ..Thus, telomeres are actively transcribed into TERRA, and SMG factors represent a molecular link between TERRA regulation and the maintenance of telomere integrity...
  42. ncbi A whole-genome assembly of Drosophila
    E W Myers
    Celera Genomics, Inc, 45 West Gude Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
    Science 287:2196-204. 2000
    ..99% without manual curation. As such, this initial reconstruction of the Drosophila sequence should be of substantial value to the scientific community...
  43. pmc CTG repeat instability and size variation timing in DNA repair-deficient mice
    Cédric Savouret
    INSERM UR383, Hopital Necker Enfants Malades, Universite Paris V, 149 161 Rue de Sèvres, 75015 Paris, France
    EMBO J 22:2264-73. 2003
    ..We found that instability over generations depends not only on parental germinal instability, but also on a second event taking place after fertilization...
  44. pmc Nucleotide sequence of the iap gene, responsible for alkaline phosphatase isozyme conversion in Escherichia coli, and identification of the gene product
    Y Ishino
    Department of Experimental Chemotherapy, Osaka University, Japan
    J Bacteriol 169:5429-33. 1987
    ..Neither the isozyme-converting activity nor labeled Iap proteins were detected in the osmotic-shock fluid of cells carrying a multicopy iap plasmid. The Iap protein seems to be associated with the membrane...
  45. pmc 454 sequencing put to the test using the complex genome of barley
    Thomas Wicker
    Institute of Plant Biology, University of Zurich, Zollikerstrasse 107, 8008 Zurich, Switzerland
    BMC Genomics 7:275. 2006
    ....
  46. ncbi Repeats in genomic DNA: mining and meaning
    J Jurka
    Genetic Information Research Institute, Sunnyvale, CA 94089, USA
    Curr Opin Struct Biol 8:333-7. 1998
    ..Analysis of these sequences, combined with experimental research, reveals a history of complex 'intracellular ecosystems' of transposable elements that are inseparably associated with genomic evolution...
  47. ncbi Whole-genome shotgun assembly and analysis of the genome of Fugu rubripes
    Samuel Aparicio
    Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, 30 Medical Drive, Singapore 117609
    Science 297:1301-10. 2002
    ..Conserved linkages between Fugu and human genes indicate the preservation of chromosomal segments from the common vertebrate ancestor, but with considerable scrambling of gene order...
  48. pmc Microevolution of the direct repeat region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: implications for interpretation of spoligotyping data
    R M Warren
    MRC Centre for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg 7505, South Africa
    J Clin Microbiol 40:4457-65. 2002
    ..tuberculosis. This has important implications for molecular epidemiologic strain tracking and for the application of spoligotype data to phylogenetic analysis of M. tuberculosis isolates...
  49. ncbi REPuter: fast computation of maximal repeats in complete genomes
    S Kurtz
    Technische Fakultat, Universitat Bielefeld, Postfach 10 01 31, D 33501 Bielefeld, Germany
    Bioinformatics 15:426-7. 1999
    ..A software tool was implemented that computes exact repeats and palindromes in entire genomes very efficiently...
  50. pmc Evolution of the mammalian transcription factor binding repertoire via transposable elements
    Guillaume Bourque
    Computational and Mathematical Biology, Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore 138672, Singapore
    Genome Res 18:1752-62. 2008
    ..Our results demonstrate that transcriptional regulatory networks are highly dynamic in eukaryotic genomes and that transposable elements play an important role in expanding the repertoire of binding sites...
  51. ncbi Complete genome sequence of a virulent isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae
    H Tettelin
    The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR, 9712 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
    Science 293:498-506. 2001
    ..Comparative genome hybridization with DNA arrays revealed strain differences in S. pneumoniae that could contribute to differences in virulence and antigenicity...
  52. pmc The TIGR Plant Repeat Databases: a collective resource for the identification of repetitive sequences in plants
    Shu Ouyang
    The Institute for Genomic Research, 9712 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 32:D360-3. 2004
    ..Collectively, these databases provide a resource for the identification, classification and analysis of repetitive sequences in plants...
  53. ncbi Origin of a substantial fraction of human regulatory sequences from transposable elements
    I King Jordan
    National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Building 38A Room N511M, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA
    Trends Genet 19:68-72. 2003
    ..Thus, TEs have probably contributed substantially to the evolution of both gene-specific and global patterns of human gene regulation...
  54. ncbi A draft sequence of the rice genome (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica)
    Jun Yu
    Beijing Genomics Institute Center of Genomics and Bioinformatics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 101300, China
    Science 296:79-92. 2002
    ..4% of predicted rice genes had a homolog in A. thaliana. The large proportion of rice genes with no recognizable homologs is due to a gradient in the GC content of rice coding sequences...
  55. ncbi Complete chloroplast genome sequences of Solanum bulbocastanum, Solanum lycopersicum and comparative analyses with other Solanaceae genomes
    Henry Daniell
    Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, Biomolecular Science, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd, Bldg 20, Room 336, Orlando, FL 32816 2364, USA
    Theor Appl Genet 112:1503-18. 2006
    ..It is possible that there has been a loss of conserved editing sites in potato and tomato...
  56. pmc Diversity, activity, and evolution of CRISPR loci in Streptococcus thermophilus
    Philippe Horvath
    Danisco France SAS, BP10, F 86220 Dangé Saint Romain, France
    J Bacteriol 190:1401-12. 2008
    ..Also, CRISPRs provide critical insights into the relationships between prokaryotes and their environments, notably the coevolution of host and viral genomes...
  57. ncbi Extensive reorganization of the plastid genome of Trifolium subterraneum (Fabaceae) is associated with numerous repeated sequences and novel DNA insertions
    Zhengqiu Cai
    The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Mol Evol 67:696-704. 2008
    ..At least some of this unique DNA may represent horizontal transfer from bacterial genomes. These unusual features provide direction for the development of more complex models of plastid genome evolution...
  58. pmc Differential methylation of genes and repeats in land plants
    Pablo D Rabinowicz
    The Institute for Genomic Research, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA
    Genome Res 15:1431-40. 2005
    ..In hexaploid wheat, this apparent excess of genes may reflect an abundance of methylated pseudogenes, which may thus be more prevalent in recent polyploids...
  59. pmc The human transcriptome map reveals extremes in gene density, intron length, GC content, and repeat pattern for domains of highly and weakly expressed genes
    Rogier Versteeg
    Department of Human Genetics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1100DE Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Genome Res 13:1998-2004. 2003
    ..Ridges are therefore an integral part of a higher order structure in the genome related to transcriptional regulation...
  60. pmc The small chromosomes of Trypanosoma brucei involved in antigenic variation are constructed around repetitive palindromes
    Bill Wickstead
    Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3RE, United Kingdom
    Genome Res 14:1014-24. 2004
    ..Moreover, palindromy appears to be a feature of (peri)centromeres in other species that can be easily overlooked. We propose that sequence inversion is one of the higher-order sequence motifs that confer chromosomal stability...
  61. ncbi Large DNA palindromes as a common form of structural chromosome aberrations in human cancers
    Hisashi Tanaka
    Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hitchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA
    Hum Cell 19:17-23. 2006
    ..A subset of loci containing palindromes is associated with gene amplification in Colo320DM, indicating that the location of palindromes in the cancer genome serves as a structural platform that supports subsequent gene amplification...
  62. pmc Comparative genotyping of Campylobacter jejuni by amplified fragment length polymorphism, multilocus sequence typing, and short repeat sequencing: strain diversity, host range, and recombination
    Leo M Schouls
    Research Laboratory for Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands
    J Clin Microbiol 41:15-26. 2003
    ....
  63. ncbi DNA hypomethylation and human diseases
    Ann S Wilson
    Preventative Health National Research Flagship, North Ryde, NSW, Australia
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1775:138-62. 2007
    ..The use of hypomethylation of interspersed repeat sequences and genes as potential biomarkers in the early detection of tumors and their prognostic use in monitoring disease progression are also examined...
  64. ncbi Structure of TPR domain-peptide complexes: critical elements in the assembly of the Hsp70-Hsp90 multichaperone machine
    C Scheufler
    Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany
    Cell 101:199-210. 2000
    ..The hydrophobic contacts with the peptide are critical for specificity. These results explain how TPR domains participate in the ordered assembly of Hsp70-Hsp90 multichaperone complexes...
  65. ncbi Mobile elements in archaeal genomes
    Kim Brugger
    Microbiology Genome group, Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
    FEMS Microbiol Lett 206:131-41. 2002
    ..Finally, DNA viruses, plasmids and DNA fragments can also be inserted into, and excised from, archaeal genomes by means of an integrase-mediated mechanism that has special archaeal characteristics...
  66. ncbi Binding of PhoP to promoters of phosphate-regulated genes in Streptomyces coelicolor: identification of PHO boxes
    Alberto Sola-Landa
    Instituto de Biotecnología de León INBIOTEC, Parque Cientifico de Leon, Av Real, 1, 24006, Leon, Spain
    Mol Microbiol 56:1373-85. 2005
    ..PHO boxes have been identified by alignment of the six direct repeat units found in those promoter regions. Each direct repeat unit adjusts to the consensus G(G/T)TCAYYYR(G/C)G...
  67. pmc Cooperative activity of BRG1 and Z-DNA formation in chromatin remodeling
    Hong Liu
    Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 7N311, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 1674, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 26:2550-9. 2006
    ..The data presented in this report establish that Z-DNA formation is an important mechanism in modulating chromatin structure, in similarity to the activities of ATP-dependent remodelers and posttranslational histone modifications...
  68. pmc Comparative genomics and molecular dynamics of DNA repeats in eukaryotes
    Guy Franck Richard
    Institut Pasteur, Unité de Génétique Moléculaire des Levures, CNRS, URA2171, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, UFR927, 25 rue du Dr Roux, F 75015, Paris, France
    Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 72:686-727. 2008
    ....
  69. ncbi A distinct small RNA pathway silences selfish genetic elements in the germline
    Vasily V Vagin
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
    Science 313:320-4. 2006
    ..Our data suggest that rasiRNAs protect the fly germline through a silencing mechanism distinct from both the miRNA and RNA interference pathways...
  70. ncbi Relationship between the cagA 3' repeat region of Helicobacter pylori, gastric histology, and susceptibility to low pH
    Y Yamaoka
    VA Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA
    Gastroenterology 117:342-9. 1999
    ..We investigated whether structural subtypes of the cagA 3' region are associated with presentation of the infection or to susceptibility to acid...
  71. pmc Formation of an F' plasmid by recombination between imperfectly repeated chromosomal Rep sequences: a closer look at an old friend (F'(128) pro lac)
    Eric Kofoid
    Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84122, USA
    J Bacteriol 185:660-3. 2003
    ..The structure of F'(128) supports the idea that amplification is initiated by Rep-Rep recombination and that general mutagenesis requires coamplification of dinB (error-prone polymerase) with lac...
  72. pmc Typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a university hospital setting by using novel software for spa repeat determination and database management
    Dag Harmsen
    Institute for Hygiene, University of Munster, Munster, Germany
    J Clin Microbiol 41:5442-8. 2003
    ..spa typing was valuable for tracking of epidemic isolates. The data show that disproval of epidemiologically suggested transmissions of MRSA is one of the main objectives of spa typing in departments with a high incidence of MRSA...
  73. ncbi Hypermethylation of CpG island loci and hypomethylation of LINE-1 and Alu repeats in prostate adenocarcinoma and their relationship to clinicopathological features
    N Y Cho
    Laboratory of Epigenetics, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
    J Pathol 211:269-77. 2007
    ....
  74. pmc Somatic and germline instability of the ATTCT repeat in spinocerebellar ataxia type 10
    Tohru Matsuura
    Department of Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA
    Am J Hum Genet 74:1216-24. 2004
    ....
  75. pmc The CRISPRdb database and tools to display CRISPRs and to generate dictionaries of spacers and repeats
    Ibtissem Grissa
    Univ Paris Sud, Institut de Genetique et Microbiologie, UMR 8621, Orsay, France
    BMC Bioinformatics 8:172. 2007
    ..As new genome sequences become available it appears necessary to develop automated scanning tools to make available CRISPRs related information and to facilitate additional investigations...
  76. pmc Chromosome painting using repetitive DNA sequences as probes for somatic chromosome identification in maize
    Akio Kato
    Division of Biological Sciences, Tucker Hall, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 7400
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:13554-9. 2004
    ..The same probe mixture identifies meiotic pachytene, late prophase I, and metaphase I chromosomes. The procedure could facilitate the study of chromosomal structure and behavior and be adapted for other plant species...
  77. ncbi The complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli K-12
    F R Blattner
    Laboratory of Genetics, University of Wisconsin Madison, 445 Henry Mall, Madison, WI 53706, USA
    Science 277:1453-62. 1997
    ..The genome also contains insertion sequence (IS) elements, phage remnants, and many other patches of unusual composition indicating genome plasticity through horizontal transfer...
  78. pmc Telomere dysfunction triggers extensive DNA fragmentation and evolution of complex chromosome abnormalities in human malignant tumors
    D Gisselsson
    Department of Clinical Genetics, University Hospital, SE 221 85 Lund, Sweden
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:12683-8. 2001
    ..Telomerase expression is not sufficient for completely stabilizing the chromosome complement but may be crucial for preventing complete genomic deterioration and maintaining cellular survival...
  79. ncbi Methylation dynamics of repetitive DNA elements in the mouse germ cell lineage
    D J Lees-Murdock
    Cancer and Ageing Research Group, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine BT52 1SA, UK
    Genomics 82:230-7. 2003
    ..5 and E17.5, which was not seen in females. These results suggest that repeat sequences undergo coordinate changes in methylation during germ cell development and give further insights into germ cell reprogramming in mice...
  80. ncbi Comprehensive analysis of heterochromatin- and RNAi-mediated epigenetic control of the fission yeast genome
    Hugh P Cam
    Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 4255, USA
    Nat Genet 37:809-19. 2005
    ..Our analyses also uncover an important role for the RNAi machinery in maintaining genomic integrity...
  81. pmc Single-molecule analysis reveals clustering and epigenetic regulation of replication origins at the yeast rDNA locus
    Philippe Pasero
    Institute of Molecular Genetics, CNRS UMR 5535 and Université Montpellier II, 34293 Montpellier Cedex 5, France
    Genes Dev 16:2479-84. 2002
    ..We conclude that rDNA replication is regulated epigenetically and that Sir2p may promote genome stability and longevity by suppressing replication-dependent rDNA recombination...
  82. pmc Conserved nucleoprotein structure at the ends of vertebrate and invertebrate chromosomes
    S Lejnine
    Biophysics Research Division, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 1055
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 92:2393-7. 1995
    ..The telomere nucleosomes were consistently approximately 40 bp smaller than bulk nucleosomes. Thus, animal telomeres have highly conserved sequences and unusually short nucleosomes with cell-specific structure...
  83. ncbi Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene is positively associated with essential hypertension
    Y Miyamoto
    Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
    Hypertension 32:3-8. 1998
    ..In conclusion, the Glu298Asp missense variant was significantly associated with essential hypertension, which suggests that it is a genetic susceptibility factor for essential hypertension...
  84. pmc A mammalian factor that binds telomeric TTAGGG repeats in vitro
    Z Zhong
    Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10021
    Mol Cell Biol 12:4834-43. 1992
    ..The apparent molecular mass of this factor, based on recovery of TRF from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, is approximately 50 kDa. We suggest that TRF binds along the length of mammalian telomeres...
  85. ncbi The plastid genome of the cryptophyte alga, Guillardia theta: complete sequence and conserved synteny groups confirm its common ancestry with red algae
    S E Douglas
    Institute for Marine Biosciences, 1411 Oxford Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 3Z1
    J Mol Evol 48:236-44. 1999
    ..Furthermore, recombination events involving both tRNA genes and the rRNA cistrons appear to have been responsible for the structure of the cryptophyte plastid genome, including the formation of the inverted repeat...
  86. ncbi Genome plasticity a key factor in the success of polyploid wheat under domestication
    Jorge Dubcovsky
    Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Science 316:1862-6. 2007
    ..Frequent gene deletions and disruptions generated by a fast replacement rate of repetitive sequences are buffered by the polyploid nature of wheat, resulting in subtle dosage effects on which selection can operate...
  87. ncbi The centromere paradox: stable inheritance with rapidly evolving DNA
    S Henikoff
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Laboratories, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Avenue North, Seattle, WA 98109, USA
    Science 293:1098-102. 2001
    ..Incompatibilities between rapidly evolving centromeric components may be responsible for both the organization of centromeric regions and the reproductive isolation of emerging species...
  88. pmc MAK, a computational tool kit for automated MITE analysis
    Guojun Yang
    Institute of Developmental and Molecular Biology and Department of Biology, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 3155, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 31:3659-65. 2003
    ..Furthermore, analysis of two MITE families with no known links to any transposon family revealed two novel transposon families, namely Math and Kid, belonging to the IS5/Harbinger/PIF superfamily...
  89. pmc Genomic comparison of archaeal conjugative plasmids from Sulfolobus
    Bo Greve
    Danish Archaea Centre, Institute of Molecular Biology, Copenhagen University, Sølvgade 83H, DK 1307 Copenhagen K, Denmark
    Archaea 1:231-9. 2004
    ....
  90. pmc Species-specific repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) sequences in Pseudomonas putida
    Isabel Aranda-Olmedo
    Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Estacion Experimental del Zaidin, Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Apdo de Correos 419, E 18080 Granada, Spain
    Nucleic Acids Res 30:1826-33. 2002
    ..putida. For this reason we suggest that the P.putida 35 bp element is a distinctive REP sequence in P.putida. This is the first time that REP sequences have been described and characterised in a group of non-enterobacteriaceae...
  91. ncbi The human XIST gene: analysis of a 17 kb inactive X-specific RNA that contains conserved repeats and is highly localized within the nucleus
    C J Brown
    Department of Genetics, Stanford University, California 94305
    Cell 71:527-42. 1992
    ..Consistent with this, fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments demonstrate localization of XIST RNA within the nucleus to a position indistinguishable from the X inactivation-associated Barr body...
  92. pmc The Drosophila GAGA transcription factor is associated with specific regions of heterochromatin throughout the cell cycle
    J W Raff
    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California San Francisco, 94143 0448
    EMBO J 13:5977-83. 1994
    ..This may help explain how the distinctive character of a committed or differentiated cell can be maintained during cell proliferation...
  93. ncbi Mammalian microRNAs derived from genomic repeats
    Neil R Smalheiser
    University of Illinois at Chicago, UIC Psychiatric Institute, MC 912, 1601 W Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
    Trends Genet 21:322-6. 2005
    ..Two of the LINE-2-derived microRNAs exhibit perfect complementarity to a large family of mRNA and EST transcripts that contain portions of MIR and other LINE-2 elements in their 3'-untranslated regions...
  94. pmc A first survey of the rye (Secale cereale) genome composition through BAC end sequencing of the short arm of chromosome 1R
    Jan Bartos
    Laboratory of Molecular Cytogenetics and Cytometry, Institute of Experimental Botany, Olomouc, Czech Republic
    BMC Plant Biol 8:95. 2008
    ..1RS translocation. A better knowledge of the rye genome could facilitate rye improvement and increase the efficiency of utilizing rye genes in wheat breeding...
  95. ncbi A role for RNAi in the selective correction of DNA methylation defects
    Felipe Karam Teixeira
    Unite de Recherche en Genomique Vegetale, CNRS UMR 8114, Institut National de la Recherche Argonomique UMR 1165, Universite d Evry Val d Essonne, 91057 Evry Cedex, France
    Science 323:1600-4. 2009
    ..Our findings suggest an important role for RNAi in protecting genomes against long-term epigenetic defects...
  96. pmc Tourist: a large family of small inverted repeat elements frequently associated with maize genes
    T E Bureau
    Botany Department, University of Georgia, Athens 30602
    Plant Cell 4:1283-94. 1992
    ..Taken together, our data suggest that Tourist may be the maize equivalent of the human Alu family of elements with respect to copy number, genomic dispersion, and the high frequency of association with genes...
  97. pmc Highly plastic genome of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806, a ubiquitous toxic freshwater cyanobacterium
    Lionel Frangeul
    Institut Pasteur, Pasteur Genopole, F 75015, Paris, France
    BMC Genomics 9:274. 2008
    ..Microcystis blooms are often toxic, potentially fatal to animals and humans, and may cause environmental problems. There has been little investigation of the genomics of these cyanobacteria...
  98. ncbi Circumsporozoite protein gene diversity among temperate and tropical Plasmodium vivax isolates from Iran
    Sedigheh Zakeri
    Malaria Research Group, Biotechnology Department, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran
    Trop Med Int Health 11:729-37. 2006
    ..This large-scale survey of parasite diversity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region provides a set of baseline data suitable for future molecular epidemiological studies of P. vivax...
  99. ncbi Why repetitive DNA is essential to genome function
    James A Shapiro
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, 920 E 58th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 80:227-50. 2005
    ..These ideas may facilitate the interpretation of comparisons between sequenced genomes, where the repetitive DNA component is often greater than the coding sequence component...
  100. ncbi RNA polymerase IV directs silencing of endogenous DNA
    A J Herr
    Sainsbury Laboratory, John Innes Centre, Norwich NR4 7UH, UK
    Science 308:118-20. 2005
    ..The existence of this distinct silencing polymerase may explain the paradoxical involvement of an RNA silencing pathway in maintenance of transcriptional silencing...

Research Grants62

  1. The Environment and Epigenome: Interplay of Toxicants and Transposons in Mammals
    CHRISTOPHER DON FAULK; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ....
  2. Understanding the Mechanism of RNA Interference
    Phillip D Zamore; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..Of particular interest is testing the idea that piRNAs acting early in development can set the epigenetic state of genes whose expression and phenotypic consequences can be observed only in the adult fly. ..
  3. GENE EXPRESSION IN AGING AND DEVELOPMENT
    WOODRING ERIK WRIGHT; Fiscal Year: 2012
    ..Knowledge of the structure and processing of telomeres and the mechanisms by which they are maintained will provide targets for the development of new drugs to treat cancer and age-related diseases. ..
  4. Testing the Hypothesis of Somatic Cell Retrotransposition in Human Brain
    DOUGLAS FREDERICK LEVINSON; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..Later in the study we will study cerebellar (hindbrain) tissue from the same subjects to evaluate possible differences between brain regions. ..
  5. Allele-Selective Inhibitors for Expanded Trinucleotide Repeat Genes
    David R Corey; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..Developing compounds to achieve allele-selective inhibition of these genes would widen the therapeutic potential of the approach and offer new perspective on mechanisms. ..
  6. Stable Maintenance of an Extrachromosomal Selfish DNA Element
    Makkuni Jayaram; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Some of the principles gleaned from this study will have implications in global symbiotic or commensalist relationships among host-parasite genomes. ..
  7. Mechanisms of biogenesis of atypical alphaviruses
    RAMASAMY RAJU; Fiscal Year: 2011
    ..Since alphaviruses are vigorously pursued as gene therapeutic and vaccine delivery vehicles, these studies will also be useful in the development of improved RNA vectors. ..
  8. Language Development in Fragile X Syndrome
    LEONARD J ABBEDUTO; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..The primary analytical tool will be hierarchical linear modeling, although other techniques, such as multiple regression, also will be used. ..
  9. MECHANISMS OF DSRNA-INDUCED GENE SILENCING
    Gregory J Hannon; Fiscal Year: 2012
    ..They serve as tools for understanding normal and aberrant biological processes and will perhaps transform clinical practice by serving as the basis for a new generation of therapeutic agents. ..
  10. TRYPANASOMA CRUZI GENOME-SBRI
    Kenneth Stuart; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..This information will aid the development on diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventative measures, as well as further our understanding of fundamental molecular phenomena. ..
  11. ASSAY FOR PNEUMOCYSTOSIS IN IMMUNODEFICIENT HOSTS
    DON GRAVES; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ..Use of monoclonal antibodies and Pneumocystis-specific DNA clones as diagnostic probes for early detection of pneumocystosis would improve therapeutic intervention and prognosis of individuals in a life-threatening situation...
  12. Genetic Mechanisms Driving Evolution of Rickettsiaceae
    Anup Madan; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Selected rickettsial proteins that may be useful in vaccine development and as potential therapeutic targets will be cloned and expressed to facilitate their characterization. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  13. GENETICS OF THE PATERNAL SEX RATIO CHROMOSOME
    John Werren; Fiscal Year: 1992
    ....
  14. REPETITIVE SEQUENCE-DEPLETE LIBRARIES OF DNA PROBES
    Xin Yuan Guan; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..It will simplify protocol for FISH, thus saving time and labor for research scientist, and yet meets the demand of advanced techniques. The DNA probes generated by this new method will be utilized world wide. ..
  15. Innovative molecular cytogenetic techniques for early leukemia/lymphoma detection
    JOE LUCAS; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Early detection of MRD will increase patient survival and profoundly impact cancer patient management. ..
  16. FUNCTIONS OF SRY AND SRY INTERACTIVE PROTEIN GENES
    Yun Fai Chris Lau; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..Understanding the mechanisms of sex determination in mouse may shed insights on those in humans, and eventually may lead to developments of clinical diagnosis and treatment of gonadal dysgenesis and infertility. ..
  17. Novel calpain inhibitors based on phage display
    RODNEY GUTTMANN; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..These studies will evaluate key aspects of LSEAL actions and provide important evidence to support the future development of this potentially new class of calpain inhibitor for use in the treatment of brain injury. ..
  18. Albany 2009: The 16th Conversation
    RAMASWAMY SARMA; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..The remaining topics look at advances in fundamental areas of medical biochemistry, and progress here will have profound impact on the way we will manage disease, including aging and cancer, in the future. ..
  19. MECHANISM OF A SELF-PROCESSING REACTION OF RNA
    G Bruening; Fiscal Year: 1990
    ..Autolytic RNA demands investigation not only on these grounds but also bacause of its unusual chemical and biological properties...
  20. SATURATED GENOME ANALYSIS VIA 2D GELS
    CHARLES SIDMAN; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ....
  21. NUCLEAR CORE FILAMENTS
    Sheldon Penman; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..They will seek monoclonal antibodies to NM filament proteins to determine their number, molecular sequences and fate at mitosis. ..
  22. PHYSICAL AND GENETIC MAPPING OF X CHROMOSOME
    Gail Herman; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ..Genetic and physical maps will be compared. Maps of the region will be compared with the corresponding region of the human X (Xq27-Xq28)...
  23. HIGH THROUGHPUT LOW COST IRS PCR BASED GENOTYPING
    David Housman; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..A second group of specific aims is focused on technical development efforts to support the central goal of the program. ..
  24. Engineered Revision of the E. coli Genome for Production
    Frederick Blattner; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..We also plan to measure the yield of DNA, and mutation frequency, and gene expression levels through DNA microarrays. ..
  25. Mapping Regulatory Pathways in Cancers
    Roland Green; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..We will use these TF focused screening arrays to study binding patterns in Icelandic breast and colon cancer samples to determine whether TF binding patterns could be a useful means of classifying tumors. ..
  26. MAP OF HUMAN CHROMOSOME 9
    David Kwiatkowski; Fiscal Year: 1993
    ....
  27. CHARACTERIZATION OF LYMPHOCYTE EXCRETED DNA
    John Rogers; Fiscal Year: 1980
    ..In addition, RNA-DNA reassociation experiments will determine whether excreted DNA is transcribed...
  28. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS IN NEOPLASIA
    Paul Neiman; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..In this fashion we hope to establish whether Myc-induced genomic instability merits wider exploration in human neoplasm. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  29. Workshop On Experimental Models from Bursa of Fabricius
    Paul Neiman; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..This workshop will serve to stimulate further development and application, and to educate interested young scientists to the opportunities presented. ..
  30. Characterization and Expression of microRNA Genes in Anopheles gambiae
    Zhijian Tu; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  31. Expression of Human Therapeutic Proteins in Transgenic Tobacco Chloroplasts
    Henry Daniell; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Successful completion of these studies would make transgenic chloroplasts ideal bioreactors for the production of safe and less expensive therapeutic proteins and open the door for in depth studies of membrane proteins. ..
  32. Comparative Genomics of Anopheline Mosquitoes
    Zhijian Tu; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ....
  33. CHARACTERIZATION & ORGANIZATION OF TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS
    Zhijian Tu; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Finally, this work will enhance our understanding of the basic genetics of An. gambiae by systematically investigating TEs, which are substantial and potentially potent components of the genome...
  34. CLONING IMPRINTED GENES FROM THE MOUSE
    Beverly Emanuel; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ....
  35. CONFOCAL MICROSCOPE
    Gary Wessel; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..The requested instrument would significantly enhance the research productivity of the broad, interdisciplinary community of researchers described here, and greatly improve the biological image capabilities in the region. ..
  36. GAA TTC STRUCTURES--FUNCTIONS AND FRIEDREICHS ATAXIA
    Robert Wells; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..TTC and their effect on transcription and on genetic instabilities (replication and recombination). ..
  37. Mechanisms of Genetic Instabilites of Triplet Repeats
    Robert Wells; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..In summary, the principal investigator will investigate the molecular mechanisms (replication, recombination, repair) that cause genetic instabilities in simple repeat sequences. ..
  38. Novel genetic markers for the yellow fever mosquito
    Zhijian Tu; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..aegypti in natural populations. ..
  39. Animal Model for Local Inflammation-Induced Breast Cancer
    Harikrishna Nakshatri; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  40. ANTIOXIDANT GENES OF MYCOBACERIUM TUBERCULOSIS
    Lee Riley; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ....
  41. SPLICEOSOME ASSEMBLY AND FUNCTION
    Alan Weiner; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ....
  42. Genetics of Cell Cycle Regulators in C. elegans
    Edward T Kipreos; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..The abstract has been modified to eliminate the previously proposed screen to identify cullin PTMs. ..
  43. Comparative Evolutionary Genomics and Infectious Disease
    Jane Carlton; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  44. MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA
    Samuel Karlin; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..by spacings between repeats, and by properties of repeat families (intergenic, coding, direct, inverted, mixed). ..
  45. MOLECULAR GENETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF SCA7
    Harry Orr; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..To gain insight into ataxin-7 function a series of experiments are proposed to characterize the cellular and subcellular expression of ataxin-7 and to identify proteins that interact with ataxin-7 using the yeast two-hybrid system. ..
  46. INCLUSION BODY MYOSITIS: PILOT STUDY OF B-INTERFERON 1A
    Rabi Tawil; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..The testing methods have been validated by the investigators in other studies of muscle disease. The information obtained in this study will be essential for the effective design and conduct of pivotal trials in IBM. ..
  47. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HOTSPOTS OF GENETIC RECOMBINATION
    Gerald Smith; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Thus, the basic research proposed here will add to the foundations for understanding, diagnosing, preventing, and curing human disease. ..
  48. Role of RNA Polymerase II Holoenzyme in Regulation
    Marian Carlson; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..The proposed studies will further our understanding of the functional interactions of RNA polymerase II holoenzymes with regulatory proteins and signal transduction pathways. ..
  49. GENOME SCAN FOR OBESITY SUSCEPTIBILITY LOCI IN SAMOANS
    Stephen McGarvey; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ....
  50. STRUCTURAL AND GENETIC STUDIES OF CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS
    Sarah Elgin; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Such knowledge is important for our understanding of human growth and development, including health problems such as cancer and aging. ..
  51. Genetic Analysis of Mycobacterial Biofilm Formation
    Gerard Cangelosi; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..The results will improve our understanding of the microbial ecology of environmental mycobacteria, and they may lead to improved methods for protecting susceptible people from MAC infection. ..
  52. MOLECULAR GENETICS OF THE SCA1 LOCUS
    Harry Orr; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Understanding the importance of these factors for SCA1 pathogenesis should provide insights for polyglutamine diseases in general. ..
  53. Gustatory and olfactory receptors of Anopheles gambiae
    Hugh Robertson; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..This work will also contribute to our overall understanding of the molecular basis of chemoreception in insects and other animals. [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  54. Epidemiology of an uropathogenic E coli clonal group
    Lee Riley; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..coli can be spread by contaminated ingestible vehicles, and use the data generated from this project to design long-term studies to better characterize risk factors associated with CgA infection. ..
  55. THE CCA-ADDING ENZYME (tRNA NUCLEOTIDYL TRANSFERASE)
    Alan Weiner; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  56. Polymorphisms of INS/IGF Signal Pathways & Female Cancer
    Gloria Ho; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..This genetic study, in conjunction with the ongoing serological study, will provide a comprehensive examination of the role of the insulin/IGF system in tumorigenes ..
  57. Genetic and Biochemical Analysis of SID-1 and SID-2
    Craig Hunter; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Although RNAi has been shown to be effective, a major obstacle remains delivery of dsRNA into human cells both in culture and in vivo. ..
  58. AUTOANTIGEN RNA HELICASE II/GU
    Benigno Valdez; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..This study may also provide an impetus for understanding the pathological roles of RH-II/Gu on the elicitation of autoimmune responses. ..
  59. The PTP, STEP, Regulates Amphetamine Actions
    Paul Lombroso; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..We show preliminary feasibility data on this approach. A complementary set of experiments will study the STEP knock-out mouse that we predict is hypersensitive to stimulant treatment. ..
  60. METHYLPHENIDATE TREATMENT OF ADHD IN CHILDREN WITH TS
    Kenneth Gadow; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..To evaluate the impact of tic severity and comorbid internalizing and externalizing symptoms on clinical outcome, children with ADHD/+tics will be compared with an additional sample of children with ADHD/-tics at ages 11 and 16 years. ..