plants

Summary

Summary: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of the kingdom Plantae. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alteration of haploid and diploid generations.

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Positive interactions among alpine plants increase with stress
    Ragan M Callaway
    Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana 59812, USA
    Nature 417:844-8. 2002
  2. ncbi The unseen majority: soil microbes as drivers of plant diversity and productivity in terrestrial ecosystems
    Marcel G A van der Heijden
    Department of Animal Ecology, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Institute of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Ecol Lett 11:296-310. 2008
  3. ncbi Biomass recalcitrance: engineering plants and enzymes for biofuels production
    Michael E Himmel
    Chemical and Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401, USA
    Science 315:804-7. 2007
  4. ncbi MicroRNAS and their regulatory roles in plants
    Matthew W Jones-Rhoades
    Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA
    Annu Rev Plant Biol 57:19-53. 2006
  5. ncbi Ecological linkages between aboveground and belowground biota
    David A Wardle
    Landcare Research, Post Office Box 69, Lincoln, New Zealand
    Science 304:1629-33. 2004
  6. pmc Establishing, maintaining and modifying DNA methylation patterns in plants and animals
    Julie A Law
    Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California Los Angeles, 90095 1606, USA
    Nat Rev Genet 11:204-20. 2010
  7. ncbi Reactive oxygen gene network of plants
    Ron Mittler
    Department of Biochemistry, Mail Stop 200, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA
    Trends Plant Sci 9:490-8. 2004
  8. ncbi Host-microbe interactions: shaping the evolution of the plant immune response
    Stephen T Chisholm
    Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, 111 Koshland Hall, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Cell 124:803-14. 2006
  9. ncbi Horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotic evolution
    Patrick J Keeling
    Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z, Canada
    Nat Rev Genet 9:605-18. 2008
  10. ncbi A renaissance of elicitors: perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns and danger signals by pattern-recognition receptors
    Thomas Boller
    Botanisches Institut, Universitat Basel, CH 4056 Basel, Switzerland
    Annu Rev Plant Biol 60:379-406. 2009

Detail Information

Publications245 found, 100 shown here

  1. ncbi Positive interactions among alpine plants increase with stress
    Ragan M Callaway
    Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana 59812, USA
    Nature 417:844-8. 2002
    b>Plants can have positive effects on each other. For example, the accumulation of nutrients, provision of shade, amelioration of disturbance, or protection from herbivores by some species can enhance the performance of neighbouring species...
  2. ncbi The unseen majority: soil microbes as drivers of plant diversity and productivity in terrestrial ecosystems
    Marcel G A van der Heijden
    Department of Animal Ecology, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Institute of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Ecol Lett 11:296-310. 2008
    ..savannah) to 80% (temperate and boreal forests) of all nitrogen, and up to 75% of phosphorus, that is acquired by plants annually...
  3. ncbi Biomass recalcitrance: engineering plants and enzymes for biofuels production
    Michael E Himmel
    Chemical and Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401, USA
    Science 315:804-7. 2007
    ..It is this property of plants that is largely responsible for the high cost of lignocellulose conversion...
  4. ncbi MicroRNAS and their regulatory roles in plants
    Matthew W Jones-Rhoades
    Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA
    Annu Rev Plant Biol 57:19-53. 2006
    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, endogenous RNAs that regulate gene expression in plants and animals...
  5. ncbi Ecological linkages between aboveground and belowground biota
    David A Wardle
    Landcare Research, Post Office Box 69, Lincoln, New Zealand
    Science 304:1629-33. 2004
    ..components are closely interlinked at the community level, reinforced by a greater degree of specificity between plants and soil organisms than has been previously supposed...
  6. pmc Establishing, maintaining and modifying DNA methylation patterns in plants and animals
    Julie A Law
    Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California Los Angeles, 90095 1606, USA
    Nat Rev Genet 11:204-20. 2010
    ..Recent findings in plants and animals have greatly increased our understanding of the pathways used to accurately target, maintain and ..
  7. ncbi Reactive oxygen gene network of plants
    Ron Mittler
    Department of Biochemistry, Mail Stop 200, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557, USA
    Trends Plant Sci 9:490-8. 2004
  8. ncbi Host-microbe interactions: shaping the evolution of the plant immune response
    Stephen T Chisholm
    Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, 111 Koshland Hall, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    Cell 124:803-14. 2006
    ..In response to the delivery of pathogen effector proteins, plants acquired surveillance proteins (R proteins) to either directly or indirectly monitor the presence of the pathogen ..
  9. ncbi Horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotic evolution
    Patrick J Keeling
    Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z, Canada
    Nat Rev Genet 9:605-18. 2008
    ..Major recent trends include the important role of HGT in adaptation to certain specialized niches and the highly variable impact of HGT in different lineages...
  10. ncbi A renaissance of elicitors: perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns and danger signals by pattern-recognition receptors
    Thomas Boller
    Botanisches Institut, Universitat Basel, CH 4056 Basel, Switzerland
    Annu Rev Plant Biol 60:379-406. 2009
    ..the diversity of MAMPs/DAMPs and on progress to identify the corresponding pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in plants. The two best-characterized MAMP/PRR pairs, flagellin/FLS2 and EF-Tu/EFR, are discussed in detail and put into a ..
  11. ncbi Growth of the plant cell wall
    Daniel J Cosgrove
    Department of Biology, 208 Mueller Laboratory, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA
    Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 6:850-61. 2005
    ..Recent discoveries have uncovered how plant cells synthesize wall polysaccharides, assemble them into a strong fibrous network and regulate wall expansion during cell growth...
  12. pmc Salt and drought stress signal transduction in plants
    Jian Kang Zhu
    Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA
    Annu Rev Plant Biol 53:247-73. 2002
    ....
  13. ncbi Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins: a socket set for organelle gene expression
    Christian Schmitz-Linneweber
    Institute of Biology, Humboldt University of Berlin, Chausseestr 117, 10115 Berlin, Germany
    Trends Plant Sci 13:663-70. 2008
    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are RNA-binding proteins that are particularly prevalent in terrestrial plants. Although the PPR protein family was only recognized eight years ago, it is already clear that these proteins have a ..
  14. pmc Evolution and functional diversification of MIRNA genes
    Josh T Cuperus
    Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA
    Plant Cell 23:431-42. 2011
    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs found in diverse eukaryotic lineages. In plants, a minority of annotated MIRNA gene families are conserved between plant families, while the majority are family- or species-specific, suggesting ..
  15. ncbi Global biodiversity: indicators of recent declines
    Stuart H M Butchart
    United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre, 219 Huntingdon Road, Cambridge CB3 0DL, UK
    Science 328:1164-8. 2010
    ....
  16. ncbi Conservation and divergence of plant microRNA genes
    Baohong Zhang
    The Institute of Environmental and Human Health TIEHH, and Department of Environmental Toxicology, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 1163, USA
    Plant J 46:243-59. 2006
    ..to 37 miRNA families in 71 different plant species, were identified from more than 6 million EST sequences in plants. The potential targets of the EST-predicted miRNAs were also elucidated from the EST and protein databases, ..
  17. pmc Effects of abiotic stress on plants: a systems biology perspective
    Grant R Cramer
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mail Stop 330, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557, USA
    BMC Plant Biol 11:163. 2011
    The natural environment for plants is composed of a complex set of abiotic stresses and biotic stresses. Plant responses to these stresses are equally complex...
  18. ncbi RNA-mediated chromatin-based silencing in plants
    Marjori Matzke
    Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Dr Bohr Gasse 3, A 1030 Vienna, Austria
    Curr Opin Cell Biol 21:367-76. 2009
    b>Plants have evolved an elaborate transcriptional machinery dedicated to eliciting sequence-specific, chromatin-based gene silencing...
  19. pmc Conservation and divergence of methylation patterning in plants and animals
    Suhua Feng
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, and Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:8689-94. 2010
    ..We found that patterns of methylation are very similar in flowering plants with methylated cytosines detected in all sequence contexts, whereas CG methylation predominates in animals...
  20. pmc PHO2, microRNA399, and PHR1 define a phosphate-signaling pathway in plants
    Rajendra Bari
    Max Planck Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology, Science Park Golm, 14476 Potsdam, Germany
    Plant Physiol 141:988-99. 2006
    Inorganic phosphate (Pi)-signaling pathways in plants are still largely unknown. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) pho2 mutant overaccumulates Pi in leaves in Pi-replete conditions...
  21. pmc The Chlamydomonas genome reveals the evolution of key animal and plant functions
    Sabeeha S Merchant
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    Science 318:245-50. 2007
    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago...
  22. ncbi The control of developmental phase transitions in plants
    Peter Huijser
    Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Carl von Linne Weg 10, 50829 Cologne, Germany
    Development 138:4117-29. 2011
    ..In addition, we discuss the evolutionary conservation of the functions of these miRNAs in regulating the control of plant developmental phase transitions...
  23. pmc Role of miRNAs and siRNAs in biotic and abiotic stress responses of plants
    Basel Khraiwesh
    Center for Plant Stress Genomics and Technology, 4700 King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955 6900, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1819:137-48. 2012
    Small, non-coding RNAs are a distinct class of regulatory RNAs in plants and animals that control a variety of biological processes...
  24. ncbi Scenarios for global biodiversity in the 21st century
    Henrique M Pereira
    Centro de Biologia Ambiental, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, 1749 016 Lisboa, Portugal
    Science 330:1496-501. 2010
    ..However, the range of projected changes is much broader than most studies suggest, partly because there are major opportunities to intervene through better policies, but also because of large uncertainties in projections...
  25. pmc Epigenetic regulation of stress responses in plants
    Viswanathan Chinnusamy
    Water Technology Centre, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110012, India
    Curr Opin Plant Biol 12:133-9. 2009
    ..Epigenetic stress memory may help plants more effectively cope with subsequent stresses...
  26. ncbi Small RNAs as big players in plant abiotic stress responses and nutrient deprivation
    Ramanjulu Sunkar
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 246 Noble Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA
    Trends Plant Sci 12:301-9. 2007
    ..Subsequent studies have demonstrated an important functional role for these small RNAs in abiotic stress responses. This review focuses on recent advances, with emphasis on integration of small RNAs in stress regulatory networks...
  27. pmc Gramene database in 2010: updates and extensions
    Ken Youens-Clark
    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 1 Bungtown Road, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724, USA
    Nucleic Acids Res 39:D1085-94. 2011
    ..its primary focus on rice, the first fully-sequenced grass genome, to become a resource for major model and crop plants including Arabidopsis, Brachypodium, maize, sorghum, poplar and grape in addition to several species of rice...
  28. ncbi ROS and redox signalling in the response of plants to abiotic stress
    Nobuhiro Suzuki
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA
    Plant Cell Environ 35:259-70. 2012
    ..Regulation of the multiple redox and ROS signals in plants requires a high degree of coordination and balance between signalling and metabolic pathways in different cellular ..
  29. ncbi Sugar sensing and signaling in plants: conserved and novel mechanisms
    Filip Rolland
    Department of Molecular Microbiology, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology VIB10, and Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology K U Leuven, 3001 Heverlee Leuven, Belgium
    Annu Rev Plant Biol 57:675-709. 2006
    ..In plants, different sugar signals are generated by photosynthesis and carbon metabolism in source and sink tissues to ..
  30. ncbi miRDeep-P: a computational tool for analyzing the microRNA transcriptome in plants
    Xiaozeng Yang
    Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA
    Bioinformatics 27:2614-5. 2011
    ..However, few computational tools have been developed to effectively deconvolute the complex information...
  31. ncbi Ecological role of volatiles produced by plants in response to damage by herbivorous insects
    J Daniel Hare
    Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, California 92521, USA
    Annu Rev Entomol 56:161-80. 2011
    b>Plants often release a blend of volatile organic compounds in response to damage by herbivorous insects that may serve as cues to locate those herbivores by natural enemies...
  32. ncbi Indole-3-acetic acid in microbial and microorganism-plant signaling
    Stijn Spaepen
    Department of Microbial and Molecular Systems, Centre of Microbial and Plant Genetics, Heverlee, Belgium
    FEMS Microbiol Rev 31:425-48. 2007
    ..Interactions between IAA-producing bacteria and plants lead to diverse outcomes on the plant side, varying from pathogenesis to phyto-stimulation...
  33. ncbi Plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria
    Ben Lugtenberg
    Leiden University, Institute of Biology, Clusius Laboratory, 2333 AL Leiden, The Netherlands
    Annu Rev Microbiol 63:541-56. 2009
    ..Mechanisms of biological control by which rhizobacteria can promote plant growth indirectly, i.e., by reducing the level of disease, include antibiosis, induction of systemic resistance, and competition for nutrients and niches...
  34. ncbi Bayesian inference of phylogeny and its impact on evolutionary biology
    J P Huelsenbeck
    Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
    Science 294:2310-4. 2001
    ....
  35. pmc DNA barcoding the floras of biodiversity hotspots
    Renaud Lahaye
    Department of Botany and Plant Biotechnology, APK Campus, University of Johannesburg, P O Box 524, Auckland Park 2006, Johannesburg, South Africa
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:2923-8. 2008
    ..DNA barcoding is well established in animals, but there is not yet any universally accepted barcode for plants. Here, we undertook intensive field collections in two biodiversity hotspots (Mesoamerica and southern Africa)...
  36. ncbi Plants have a sensitive perception system for the most conserved domain of bacterial flagellin
    G Felix
    Friedrich Miescher Institute, Basel, Switzerland
    Plant J 18:265-76. 1999
    The flagellum is an important virulence factor for bacteria pathogenic to animals and plants. Here we demonstrate that plants have a highly sensitive chemoperception system for eubacterial flagellins, specifically targeted to the most ..
  37. ncbi MicroRNAs and their regulatory roles in animals and plants
    Baohong Zhang
    The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, and Department of Environmental Toxicology, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409, USA
    J Cell Physiol 210:279-89. 2007
    ..They exist in animals, plants, and viruses, and play an important role in gene silencing...
  38. pmc Principles of microRNA-target recognition
    Julius Brennecke
    European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany
    PLoS Biol 3:e85. 2005
    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression in plants and animals. Although their biological importance has become clear, how they recognize and regulate target genes remains less well understood...
  39. pmc Innate immunity in plants: an arms race between pattern recognition receptors in plants and effectors in microbial pathogens
    Thomas Boller
    Zurich Basel Plant Science Center, Botanical Institute, University of Basel, Hebelstrasse 1, 4056 Basel, Switzerland
    Science 324:742-4. 2009
    For many years, research on a suite of plant defense responses that begin when plants are exposed to general microbial elicitors was underappreciated, for a good reason: There has been no critical experimental demonstration of their ..
  40. ncbi Pectin structure and biosynthesis
    Debra Mohnen
    Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, DOE BioEnergy Science Center, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 4712, United States
    Curr Opin Plant Biol 11:266-77. 2008
    ..Manipulation of pectin synthesis is expected to impact diverse plant agronomical properties including plant biomass characteristics important for biofuel production...
  41. ncbi Structure of linkage disequilibrium in plants
    Sherry A Flint-Garcia
    Department of Genetics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, USA
    Annu Rev Plant Biol 54:357-74. 2003
    ..With the exception of maize and Arabidopsis, little research has been conducted on LD in plants. The mating system of the species (selfing versus outcrossing), and phenomena such as population structure and ..
  42. ncbi Cold stress regulation of gene expression in plants
    Viswanathan Chinnusamy
    Water Technology Centre, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, India
    Trends Plant Sci 12:444-51. 2007
    Cold stress adversely affects plant growth and development. Most temperate plants acquire freezing tolerance by a process called cold acclimation...
  43. ncbi The structure, function, and biosynthesis of plant cell wall pectic polysaccharides
    Kerry Hosmer Caffall
    University of Georgia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, Athens, 30602, United States
    Carbohydr Res 344:1879-900. 2009
    ..consist of carbohydrate, protein, and aromatic compounds and are essential to the proper growth and development of plants. The carbohydrate components make up approximately 90% of the primary wall, and are critical to wall function...
  44. ncbi Genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing in plants: opportunities and challenges
    W Brad Barbazuk
    Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St Louis, Missouri 63132, USA
    Genome Res 18:1381-92. 2008
    ..AS is known to contribute to gene regulation and proteome diversity in animals, the study of its importance in plants is in its early stages...
  45. ncbi MAPK cascade signalling networks in plant defence
    Andrea Pitzschke
    Max F Perutz Laboratories, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
    Curr Opin Plant Biol 12:421-6. 2009
    ..of stress signals and their transduction into appropriate responses is crucial for the adaptation and survival of plants. Kinase cascades of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) class play a remarkably important role in plant ..
  46. ncbi Toward a systems approach to understanding plant cell walls
    Chris Somerville
    Carnegie Institution, Department of Plant Biology, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Science 306:2206-11. 2004
    One of the defining features of plants is a body plan based on the physical properties of cell walls...
  47. ncbi What have we learned from 15 years of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE)? A meta-analytic review of the responses of photosynthesis, canopy properties and plant production to rising CO2
    Elizabeth A Ainsworth
    Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois, 190 Edward R Madigan Laboratory, 1201 W Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
    New Phytol 165:351-71. 2005
    Free-air CO(2) enrichment (FACE) experiments allow study of the effects of elevated [CO(2)] on plants and ecosystems grown under natural conditions without enclosure...
  48. ncbi Soil warming and carbon-cycle feedbacks to the climate system
    J M Melillo
    The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA
    Science 298:2173-6. 2002
    ..We also show that warming increases the availability of mineral nitrogen to plants. Because plant growth in many mid-latitude forests is nitrogen-limited, warming has the potential to indirectly ..
  49. pmc Vive la différence: biogenesis and evolution of microRNAs in plants and animals
    Michael J Axtell
    Department of Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, 208 Mueller Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    Genome Biol 12:221. 2011
    MicroRNAs are pervasive in both plants and animals, but many aspects of their biogenesis, function and evolution differ. We reveal how these differences contribute to characteristic features of microRNA evolution in the two kingdoms.
  50. ncbi How do plants "notice" attack by herbivorous arthropods?
    Monika Hilker
    Freie Universitat Berlin, Institute of Biology, Berlin, Germany
    Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 85:267-80. 2010
    ..Understanding the mechanisms of plant responses to the different phases of herbivore attack will be a key challenge in unravelling the complex communication pathways between plants and herbivores.
  51. pmc A two-locus global DNA barcode for land plants: the coding rbcL gene complements the non-coding trnH-psbA spacer region
    W John Kress
    Department of Botany, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 2:e508. 2007
    ..Discovery of a DNA barcode for land plants has been limited by intrinsically lower rates of sequence evolution in plant genomes than that observed in animals...
  52. ncbi Parallel declines in pollinators and insect-pollinated plants in Britain and the Netherlands
    J C Biesmeijer
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology and Earth and Biosphere Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK
    Science 313:351-4. 2006
    ..Taken together, these findings strongly suggest a causal connection between local extinctions of functionally linked plant and pollinator species...
  53. ncbi Epigenetic contribution to stress adaptation in plants
    Marie Mirouze
    Department of Plant Biology, Sciences III, University of Geneva, 30 Quai Ernest Ansermet, Geneva 4, Switzerland
    Curr Opin Plant Biol 14:267-74. 2011
    ....
  54. ncbi Licensed to kill: the lifestyle of a necrotrophic plant pathogen
    Jan A L van Kan
    Wageningen University, Laboratory of Phytopathology, Binnenhaven 5, 6709 PD Wageningen, The Netherlands
    Trends Plant Sci 11:247-53. 2006
    ..their hosts in a rather unsophisticated manner, necrotrophs are now known to use subtle mechanisms to subdue host plants. The gray mould pathogen Botrytis cinerea is one of the most comprehensively studied necrotrophic fungal plant ..
  55. ncbi RNA silencing in plants
    David Baulcombe
    The Sainsbury Laboratory, John Innes Centre, Colney Lane, Norwich NR4 7UH, UK
    Nature 431:356-63. 2004
    There are at least three RNA silencing pathways for silencing specific genes in plants. In these pathways, silencing signals can be amplified and transmitted between cells, and may even be self-regulated by feedback mechanisms...
  56. ncbi Cross talk between signaling pathways in pathogen defense
    Barbara N Kunkel
    Department of Biology, Washington University, Campus Box 1137, 1 Brookings Drive, St Louis, Missouri 63130, USA
    Curr Opin Plant Biol 5:325-31. 2002
    ..The SA and JA signaling pathways are mutually antagonistic. This regulatory cross talk may have evolved to allow plants to fine-tune the induction of their defenses in response to different plant pathogens.
  57. ncbi Genic microsatellite markers in plants: features and applications
    Rajeev K Varshney
    Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research IPK, Corrensstrasse 3, D 06466 Gatersleben, Germany
    Trends Biotechnol 23:48-55. 2005
    ..Applications and potential uses of EST-SSRs in plant genetics and breeding are discussed...
  58. pmc The frequency of polyploid speciation in vascular plants
    Troy E Wood
    Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity, University of Munster, 48149 Munster, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:13875-9. 2009
    Since its discovery in 1907, polyploidy has been recognized as an important phenomenon in vascular plants, and several lines of evidence indicate that most, if not all, plant species ultimately have a polyploid ancestry...
  59. ncbi Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in plants
    Maria Cristina Suarez Rodriguez
    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    Annu Rev Plant Biol 61:621-49. 2010
    ..Future work needs to focus on identifying substrates of MAPKs, and on understanding how specificity is achieved among MAPK signaling pathways...
  60. pmc An endogenous, systemic RNAi pathway in plants
    Patrice Dunoyer
    Institut de Biologie Moleculaire des Plantes du CNRS, UPR2357, Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg Cedex, France
    EMBO J 29:1699-712. 2010
    ..endogenous IRs are genetically virtually indistinguishable from the transgene constructs commonly used for RNAi in plants. We show how these loci can be useful probes of the cellular mechanism and fluidity of RNA-silencing pathways in ..
  61. ncbi Epigenetic regulation of transposable elements in plants
    Damon Lisch
    Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA
    Annu Rev Plant Biol 60:43-66. 2009
    ..Together, these observations suggest that naturally occurring changes in transposon activity may have had an important impact on the causes and consequences of epigenetic silencing in plants.
  62. pmc Multiple lateral gene transfers and duplications have promoted plant parasitism ability in nematodes
    Etienne G J Danchin
    Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Universite de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Unité Mixte de Recherche 1301, Interactions Biotiques et Santé Végétale, F 06903 Sophia Antipolis, France
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:17651-6. 2010
    ..Multiple functional acquisitions of exogenous genes that provide selective advantage were probably crucial for the emergence and proficiency of plant parasitism in nematodes...
  63. ncbi Decoding genes with coexpression networks and metabolomics - 'majority report by precogs'
    Kazuki Saito
    RIKEN Plant Science Center, Tsurumi ku, Yokohama 230 0045, Japan
    Trends Plant Sci 13:36-43. 2008
    Following the sequencing of whole genomes of model plants, high-throughput decoding of gene function is a major challenge in modern plant biology...
  64. ncbi Temperature sensitivity of soil carbon decomposition and feedbacks to climate change
    Eric A Davidson
    The Woods Hole Research Center, PO Box 296, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA
    Nature 440:165-73. 2006
    ....
  65. pmc Dual coding of siRNAs and miRNAs by plant transposable elements
    Jittima Piriyapongsa
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 0230, USA
    RNA 14:814-21. 2008
    ..The siRNA-to-miRNA evolutionary transition is representative of a number of other regulatory mechanisms that evolved to silence TEs and were later co-opted to serve as regulators of host gene expression...
  66. ncbi How do plants achieve immunity? Defence without specialized immune cells
    Steven H Spoel
    Institute of Molecular Plant Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JR, UK
    Nat Rev Immunol 12:89-100. 2012
    ..b>Plants, however, lack specialized mobile immune cells...
  67. ncbi Evolution and diversity of plant cell walls: from algae to flowering plants
    Zoë A Popper
    Botany and Plant Science, School of Natural Sciences, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland
    Annu Rev Plant Biol 62:567-90. 2011
    All photosynthetic multicellular Eukaryotes, including land plants and algae, have cells that are surrounded by a dynamic, complex, carbohydrate-rich cell wall...
  68. pmc MicroRNAs in plants
    Brenda J Reinhart
    Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, and Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA
    Genes Dev 16:1616-26. 2002
    ..We find that miRNAs are also present in plants, indicating that this class of noncoding RNA arose early in eukaryotic evolution...
  69. pmc Genetic and functional diversification of small RNA pathways in plants
    Zhixin Xie
    Center for Gene Research and Biotechnology and Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, USA
    PLoS Biol 2:E104. 2004
    ..Unlike many animals, plants encode multiple DCL and RDR proteins...
  70. pmc 22-Nucleotide RNAs trigger secondary siRNA biogenesis in plants
    Ho Ming Chen
    Institute of Plant and Microbial Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:15269-74. 2010
    The effect of RNA silencing in plants can be amplified if the production of secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is triggered by the interaction of microRNAs (miRNAs) or siRNAs with a long target RNA...
  71. ncbi Compromising genetic diversity in the wild: unmonitored large-scale release of plants and animals
    Linda Laikre
    Department of Zoology, Division of Population Genetics, Stockholm University, S 10691 Stockholm, Sweden
    Trends Ecol Evol 25:520-9. 2010
    Large-scale exploitation of wild animals and plants through fishing, hunting and logging often depends on augmentation through releases of translocated or captively raised individuals. Such releases are performed worldwide in vast numbers...
  72. ncbi Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in plants
    Marie Theres Hauser
    Department of Applied Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Muthgasse 18, Austria
    Biochim Biophys Acta 1809:459-68. 2011
    ..information gathered during the last 60 years on naturally occurring and induced epialleles and paramutations in plants. We present the major players of epigenetic regulation and their importance in controlling stress responses...
  73. ncbi Proline accumulation in plants: a review
    Nathalie Verbruggen
    Laboratoire de Physiologie et de Génétique Moléculaire des Plantes, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine CP242, Bd du Triomphe, 1050, Brussels, Belgium
    Amino Acids 35:753-9. 2008
    Proline (Pro) accumulation is a common physiological response in many plants in response to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses. Controversy has surrounded the possible role(s) of proline accumulation...
  74. pmc An expanding universe of circadian networks in higher plants
    Jose L Pruneda-Paz
    Section of Cell and Developmental Biology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
    Trends Plant Sci 15:259-65. 2010
    Extensive circadian clock networks regulate almost every biological process in plants. Clock-controlled physiological responses are coupled with daily oscillations in environmental conditions resulting in enhanced fitness and growth vigor...
  75. ncbi Development of series of gateway binary vectors, pGWBs, for realizing efficient construction of fusion genes for plant transformation
    Tsuyoshi Nakagawa
    Department of Molecular and Functional Genomics, Center for Integrated Research in Science, Shimane University, 1060 Nishikawatsu, Matsue, Japan
    J Biosci Bioeng 104:34-41. 2007
    ..Moreover, tissue-specific and inducible gene expression using a promoter was also monitored with pGWBs. It is expected that, the pGWB system will serve as a powerful tool for plasmid construction in plant research...
  76. ncbi A catalogue of the effector secretome of plant pathogenic oomycetes
    Sophien Kamoun
    Department of Plant Pathology, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Wooster, Ohio 44691, USA
    Annu Rev Phytopathol 44:41-60. 2006
    ..phylogenetically distinct group of eukaryotic microorganisms that includes some of the most notorious pathogens of plants. Oomycetes accomplish parasitic colonization of plants by modulating host cell defenses through an array of ..
  77. ncbi Source to sink: regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in plants
    Christopher I Cazzonelli
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
    Trends Plant Sci 15:266-74. 2010
    Carotenoids are a diverse group of colourful pigments naturally found in plants, algae, fungi and bacteria...
  78. ncbi A triptych of the evolution of plant transposable elements
    Maud I Tenaillon
    CNRS, UMR 0320 UMR8120 Génétique Végétale, F 91190 Gif sur Yvette, France
    Trends Plant Sci 15:471-8. 2010
    ..Finally, we focus on the often-ignored third panel of our triptych - the population processes that determine the ultimate evolutionary fate of TE insertions...
  79. ncbi Molecular regulators of phosphate homeostasis in plants
    Wei Yi Lin
    Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC
    J Exp Bot 60:1427-38. 2009
    ..To maintain cellular Pi homeostasis, plants have developed a series of adaptive responses to facilitate external Pi acquisition and to limit Pi consumption ..
  80. ncbi Intrinsically disordered chaperones in plants and animals
    Peter Tompa
    Institute of Enzymology, Biological Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Karolina ut 29, H 1113 Budapest, Hungary
    Biochem Cell Biol 88:167-74. 2010
    ..with particular focus on (i) the structure and function of IDPs in general, (ii) disordered chaperones in plants, (iii) disordered chaperones in other organisms spanning from insects to mammals, (iv) the possible mechanisms of ..
  81. pmc Widely targeted metabolomics based on large-scale MS/MS data for elucidating metabolite accumulation patterns in plants
    Yuji Sawada
    RIKEN Plant Science Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
    Plant Cell Physiol 50:37-47. 2009
    ..and a high throughput are difficult to achieve at the same time due to the wide diversity of metabolites in plants. Here, we have established a novel and practical metabolomics methodology for quantifying hundreds of targeted ..
  82. ncbi Ribosomal ITS sequences and plant phylogenetic inference
    I Alvarez
    Department of Botany, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
    Mol Phylogenet Evol 29:417-34. 2003
    One of the most popular sequences for phylogenetic inference at the generic and infrageneric levels in plants is the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the 18S-5.8S-26S nuclear ribosomal cistron...
  83. ncbi The path forward for biofuels and biomaterials
    Arthur J Ragauskas
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    Science 311:484-9. 2006
    ..The integration of agroenergy crops and biorefinery manufacturing technologies offers the potential for the development of sustainable biopower and biomaterials that will lead to a new manufacturing paradigm...
  84. ncbi Snf1-related protein kinases (SnRKs) act within an intricate network that links metabolic and stress signalling in plants
    Nigel G Halford
    Plant Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK
    Biochem J 419:247-59. 2009
    ..In plants, the SnRK family comprises not only SnRK1, but also two other subfamilies, SnRK2 and SnRK3, with a total of 38 ..
  85. pmc Endoplasmic reticulum protein quality control and its relationship to environmental stress responses in plants
    Jian Xiang Liu
    State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Plant Biology, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, China 200433
    Plant Cell 22:2930-42. 2010
    ..conditions, the ER QC system appears to have been usurped to serve as an environmental sensor and responder in plants. Under stressful conditions, the ER protein folding machinery reaches a limit as the demands for protein folding ..
  86. ncbi Plants as bioreactors: Recent developments and emerging opportunities
    Arun K Sharma
    Department of Plant Molecular Biology, University of Delhi South Campus, New Delhi 110021, India
    Biotechnol Adv 27:811-32. 2009
    In recent years, the use of plants as bioreactors has emerged as an exciting area of research and significant advances have created new opportunities...
  87. ncbi Histone methylation in higher plants
    Chunyan Liu
    National Key Laboratory of Plant Genomics and Center for Plant Gene Research, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
    Annu Rev Plant Biol 61:395-420. 2010
    ..the impact of histone methylation on genome management, transcriptional regulation, and development in plants. The aim of this review is to summarize the biochemical, genetic, and molecular action of histone methylation in ..
  88. pmc Nitrogen uptake, assimilation and remobilization in plants: challenges for sustainable and productive agriculture
    Celine Masclaux-Daubresse
    Institut Jean Pierre Bourgin IJPB, UMR 1318, INRA, 78026 Versailles Cedex, France
    Ann Bot 105:1141-57. 2010
    ..Improving nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) of crop plants is thus of key importance...
  89. ncbi Palaeogenomics of plants: synteny-based modelling of extinct ancestors
    Michael Abrouk
    INRA, UMR 1095, Laboratoire Genetique, Diversité et Ecophysiologie des Céréales, 234 avenue du Brezet, 63100 Clermont Ferrand, France
    Trends Plant Sci 15:479-87. 2010
    ..Recent palaeogenomic data demonstrate that whole-genome duplications have provided a motor for the evolutionary success of flowering plants over the last 50-70 million years.
  90. ncbi Toward automatic reconstruction of a highly resolved tree of life
    Francesca D Ciccarelli
    European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69012 Heidelberg, Germany
    Science 311:1283-7. 2006
    ..For example, we place the phylum Acidobacteria as a sister group of delta-Proteobacteria, support a Gram-positive origin of Bacteria, and suggest a thermophilic last universal common ancestor...
  91. ncbi CoP: a database for characterizing co-expressed gene modules with biological information in plants
    Yoshiyuki Ogata
    Department of Biotechnology Research, Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan
    Bioinformatics 26:1267-8. 2010
    ....
  92. ncbi Plastidial retrograde signalling--a true "plastid factor" or just metabolite signatures?
    Thomas Pfannschmidt
    Institute of General Botany and Plant Physiology, Department of Plant Physiology, University of Jena, Dornburger Str 159, 07743 Jena, Germany
    Trends Plant Sci 15:427-35. 2010
    ..Here, I critically assess the current models of retrograde signalling and discuss novel ideas and potential connections...
  93. ncbi Temporal dynamics in a pollination network
    Jens M Olesen
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Aarhus, Aarhus C, Denmark
    Ecology 89:1573-82. 2008
    ..Second, we looked for the ecological properties most likely to be mediating this dynamical process and found that both abundance and phenophase length were important determinants of the number of links per species...
  94. ncbi Plant and animal sensors of conserved microbial signatures
    Pamela C Ronald
    Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
    Science 330:1061-4. 2010
    The last common ancestor of plants and animals may have lived 1 billion years ago. Plants and animals have occasionally exchanged genes but, for the most part, have countered selective pressures independently...
  95. pmc Benefits for plants in ant-plant protective mutualisms: a meta-analysis
    Matthew D Trager
    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e14308. 2010
    ..if reproductive effects were predicted from reductions in herbivory and to identify characteristics of the plants, ants and environment that explained variation in ant protection...
  96. ncbi Big impacts by small RNAs in plant development
    George Chuck
    Plant Gene Expression Center, United States Department of Agriculture Agriculture Research Service and the University of California, Albany, CA 94710, USA
    Curr Opin Plant Biol 12:81-6. 2009
    ..Integrating these unique functions into the overall scheme for plant growth will give a more complete picture of how they have evolved as unique developmental systems...
  97. ncbi Biotic interactions and plant invasions
    Charles E Mitchell
    Department of Biology and Curriculum in Ecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 3280, USA
    Ecol Lett 9:726-40. 2006
    ..Here, we examine indirect effects involving enemies, mutualists and competitors of introduced plants, and effects of abiotic conditions on biotic interactions...
  98. ncbi Epigenetic inheritance in plants
    Ian R Henderson
    Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    Nature 447:418-24. 2007
    ..Techniques for studying model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana have enabled researchers to begin to uncover the pathways that establish and maintain ..
  99. ncbi Entering and breaking: virulence effector proteins of oomycete plant pathogens
    Brett M Tyler
    Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, One Washington Street, Blacksburg, VA 24061 0477, USA
    Cell Microbiol 11:13-20. 2009
    Oomycete pathogens of plants and animals are related to marine algae and have evolved mechanisms to avoid or suppress host defences independently of other groups of pathogens, such as bacteria and fungi...
  100. pmc Interactions among predators and the cascading effects of vertebrate insectivores on arthropod communities and plants
    Kailen A Mooney
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 2525, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:7335-40. 2010
    ..the effects of insectivorous birds, bats, or lizards on predaceous arthropods, herbivorous arthropods, and plants. Although vertebrate insectivores fed as intraguild predators, strongly reducing predaceous arthropods (38%), they ..

Research Grants35

  1. Selenium and prostate cancer apoptosis pathways
    Junxuan Lu; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..The mechanistic insights will help to guide the design of novel Se agents with better efficacy and tolerance and to interpret the results of PCa prevention trials with Se. ..
  2. SOURCES OF NEUROACTIVE ANALGESIC N-ACYLETHANOLAMINES
    Kent Chapman; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..NAEs recently were found to be enriched in seeds of higher plants, and we propose in this exploratory research and development phase to identify abundant, natural sources of NAE-..
  3. MATURATION OF CHLOROPLAST CYTOCHROMES
    Sabeeha Merchant; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ....
  4. In-Situ Sediment Remediation Using Benthic Waterjet Amendment Placement
    Joel G Burken; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..This range of experiences and expertise is unique and will certainly help in making success in this research endeavor highly likely. ..
  5. Protein Surface Mapping: Experimentation and Computation
    Robert Hettich; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..At present, this experimental capability is non-existent. ..
  6. RNA-Mediated Silencing: Mechanisms and Biological Roles in Chlamydomonas
    Heriberto Cerutti; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..The overall findings are expected to improve our ability to exploit RNAi as an experimental and/or therapeutic tool, with likely impacts in both medicine and agriculture. ..
  7. DNA REPLICATION IN ANIMAL CELLS
    Howard Cedar; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  8. Functional Reconstitution of Yeast Exocytosis
    James A McNew; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..abstract_text> ..
  9. Pathological Role of bFGF in Human Adult Articular Cartilage
    HEE JEONG IM SAMPEN; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Better understanding of the regulation and function of the posttranslational modifier SUMO in traumatic/arthritic cartilage may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention in cartilage-associated joint diseases such as OA. ..
  10. Genetics of Programmed Cell Death in Arabidoposis
    Jeffery L Dangl; Fiscal Year: 2010
    b>Plants, like all higher eukaryotes, must control the onset and spread of cell death during development and in response to environmental signals. Plant biology is replete with examples of developmentally programmed cell death (PCD)...
  11. Nutritional Copper Signaling and Homeostasis
    Sabeeha Merchant; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Cu cells and err I vs. wild-type cells, in parallel with sub-proteomic gel- and multi-dimensional chromatography-based analyses of copper-replete vs. copper-deficient cells. ..
  12. Novel Molecular Profiling of Prostate Cancer Signatures
    Shao Yao Ying; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..These results may pave the way for a precise gene-chip diagnosis of stage-specific markers of human prostate cancer. ..
  13. TRANSCRIPTION AND MODIFICATION OF CHROMATIN DNA
    Howard Cedar; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..abstract_text> ..
  14. ALTERED KCa CHANNEL EXPRESSION IN DEVELOPING CEREBELLUM
    ANDREA YOOL; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..The rat provides a useful model for studying postnatal cerebellar development and neuropathological damage, and may provide insights into methods to manipulate developmental abnormalities in the cerebellum. ..
  15. NOS-INDEPENDENT NO PRODUCTION IN THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
    Leonid Moroz; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..Thus, significant gains can be made in our understanding of the synthesis of this gaseous messenger in the brain. This work will also contribute to our understanding of the neural functions in normal and pathological conditions. ..
  16. Target Specificity of the Yeast Retrotransposon Ty5
    Daniel Voytas; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ....
  17. ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINANTS OF MALARIA IN BELIZE
    Eliska Rejmankova; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..We will also explore management options such as selective burning that will prevent establishment of TDM and formation of An. vestitipennis habitats. ..
  18. Metagenomic analysis of the human virome
    Eric L Delwart; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..This metagenomic survey of non-human nucleic acids in humans will therefore begin the task of determining the full range of viral diversity in humans. ..
  19. Lipid Droplets: Metabolic Consequences of Stored Neutral Lipids
    Dawn Brasaemle; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  20. How do cyclins drive the cell cycle?
    Frederick R Cross; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Overall, we are interested in regulation of cell cycle dynamics, and in cyclin-specific pathways promoting individual cell cycle events. ..
  21. Gene Repression in Fragile X Syndrome
    Howard Cedar; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  22. Microchip to Detect Influenza Infection and Type in Nasopharyngeal Swabs
    Catherine M Klapperich; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  23. MEMBRANE FUNCTION IN MUTANTS OF CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS
    John Browse; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..Quantitative measures of low-temperature performance and thermotolerance of the range of desaturase mutants will be correlated with fatty acid composition and measurements of membrane fluidity. ..
  24. Genetic analysis of a developmental clock in Arabidopsis thaliana
    RICHARD POETHIG; Fiscal Year: 2008
    Higher organisms undergo several significant transitions during their development. In plants, the best understood of these is the transition from a vegetative to a reproductive phase of shoot development...
  25. Role of an essential RNA chaperone in virus replication
    Peter Nagy; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..central step in the infection cycles of plus-strand RNA viruses, which cause many diseases in humans, animals and plants. In spite of its significance, the mechanism of viral RNA replication is incompletely understood...
  26. Host factors involved in viral RNA recombination
    Peter Nagy; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..recombination because numerous recombinants can easily and rapidly be recovered: (i) in yeast cells, (ii) in whole plants, and (iii) in the in vitro CNV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) assay...
  27. Methyl selenium regulation of Angiogenic switch Mech
    Junxuan Lu; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..unreadable] [unreadable]..
  28. TRANSGRESSIVE SEGREGATION, ADAPTATION, AND SPECIATION
    Loren Rieseberg; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..The proposed work represents an important step toward understanding the contribution of hybridization to adaptive evolution and speciation. ..
  29. Roles of host RNA binding proteins in virus replication
    Peter Nagy; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..The tractable in vitro and in vivo TBSV system developed by the investigator could prove beneficial to studies of other, less amenable RNA viruses. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  30. Acquisition of a High-throughput Confocal Imaging System
    Claire Walczak; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..Overall the proposed instrumentation would have a significant impact on the research approaches and progress made by life sciences researchers at our university. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  31. Dissecting the mechanism of viral RNA recombination
    Peter Nagy; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..The PI has also developed an efficient in vivo RNA recombination system in whole plants and single cells (protoplasts), which make Tombusviruses exceptionally suitable for studying RNA recombination...
  32. MECHANISM OF CONFORMATIONAL COUPLING
    MICHAEL ZHU; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..Results from these studies will greatly enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanism of intracellular Ca2+ regulation by the influx through Trp and native store-operated channels. ..