oceans and seas

Summary

Summary: Geographic locations providing habitat for marine organisms.

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Coral reefs under rapid climate change and ocean acidification
    O Hoegh-Guldberg
    Centre for Marine Studies, University of Queensland, St Lucia, 4072 Queensland, Australia
    Science 318:1737-42. 2007
  2. ncbi Anthropogenic ocean acidification over the twenty-first century and its impact on calcifying organisms
    James C Orr
    Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l Environnement, UMR CEA CNRS, CEA Saclay, F 91191 Gif sur Yvette, France
    Nature 437:681-6. 2005
  3. ncbi Oceanography: anthropogenic carbon and ocean pH
    Ken Caldeira
    Energy and Environment Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550, USA
    Nature 425:365. 2003
  4. ncbi Impacts of biodiversity loss on ocean ecosystem services
    Boris Worm
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4J1
    Science 314:787-90. 2006
  5. ncbi A global map of human impact on marine ecosystems
    Benjamin S Halpern
    National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, 735 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, USA
    Science 319:948-52. 2008
  6. ncbi The impact of climate change on the world's marine ecosystems
    Ove Hoegh-Guldberg
    Ocean and Coasts Program, Global Change Institute, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
    Science 328:1523-8. 2010
  7. ncbi Meta-analysis reveals negative yet variable effects of ocean acidification on marine organisms
    Kristy J Kroeker
    Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Ecol Lett 13:1419-34. 2010
  8. ncbi Rebuilding global fisheries
    Boris Worm
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4J1, Canada
    Science 325:578-85. 2009
  9. ncbi Genomic and functional adaptation in surface ocean planktonic prokaryotes
    Shibu Yooseph
    J Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA
    Nature 468:60-6. 2010
  10. ncbi The impacts of climate change in coastal marine systems
    Christopher D G Harley
    Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California Davis, Bodega Bay, CA 94923, USA
    Ecol Lett 9:228-41. 2006

Detail Information

Publications344 found, 100 shown here

  1. ncbi Coral reefs under rapid climate change and ocean acidification
    O Hoegh-Guldberg
    Centre for Marine Studies, University of Queensland, St Lucia, 4072 Queensland, Australia
    Science 318:1737-42. 2007
    ..As the International Year of the Reef 2008 begins, scaled-up management intervention and decisive action on global emissions are required if the loss of coral-dominated ecosystems is to be avoided...
  2. ncbi Anthropogenic ocean acidification over the twenty-first century and its impact on calcifying organisms
    James C Orr
    Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l Environnement, UMR CEA CNRS, CEA Saclay, F 91191 Gif sur Yvette, France
    Nature 437:681-6. 2005
    ..Our findings indicate that conditions detrimental to high-latitude ecosystems could develop within decades, not centuries as suggested previously...
  3. ncbi Oceanography: anthropogenic carbon and ocean pH
    Ken Caldeira
    Energy and Environment Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550, USA
    Nature 425:365. 2003
  4. ncbi Impacts of biodiversity loss on ocean ecosystem services
    Boris Worm
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4J1
    Science 314:787-90. 2006
    ..Yet available data suggest that at this point, these trends are still reversible...
  5. ncbi A global map of human impact on marine ecosystems
    Benjamin S Halpern
    National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, 735 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, USA
    Science 319:948-52. 2008
    ....
  6. ncbi The impact of climate change on the world's marine ecosystems
    Ove Hoegh-Guldberg
    Ocean and Coasts Program, Global Change Institute, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
    Science 328:1523-8. 2010
    ..Further change will continue to create enormous challenges and costs for societies worldwide, particularly those in developing countries...
  7. ncbi Meta-analysis reveals negative yet variable effects of ocean acidification on marine organisms
    Kristy J Kroeker
    Stanford University, Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA
    Ecol Lett 13:1419-34. 2010
    ..Our analyses suggest that the biological effects of ocean acidification are generally large and negative, but the variation in sensitivity amongst organisms has important implications for ecosystem responses...
  8. ncbi Rebuilding global fisheries
    Boris Worm
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4J1, Canada
    Science 325:578-85. 2009
    ..Impacts of international fleets and the lack of alternatives to fishing complicate prospects for rebuilding fisheries in many poorer regions, highlighting the need for a global perspective on rebuilding marine resources...
  9. ncbi Genomic and functional adaptation in surface ocean planktonic prokaryotes
    Shibu Yooseph
    J Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA
    Nature 468:60-6. 2010
    ..Their genomic features also lead us to propose that one method used to avoid predation by viruses and/or bacterivores is by means of slow growth and the maintenance of low biomass...
  10. ncbi The impacts of climate change in coastal marine systems
    Christopher D G Harley
    Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California Davis, Bodega Bay, CA 94923, USA
    Ecol Lett 9:228-41. 2006
    ....
  11. pmc Quantifying rates of evolutionary adaptation in response to ocean acidification
    Jennifer M Sunday
    Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada
    PLoS ONE 6:e22881. 2011
    ..Our comparisons suggest that information on genetic variation, phenotypic variation, and key demographic parameters, may lend valuable insight into relative evolutionary potentials across a large number of species...
  12. pmc Estimating prokaryotic diversity and its limits
    Thomas P Curtis
    Department of Civil Engineering, Centre for Molecular Ecology, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:10494-9. 2002
    ..Nevertheless, it is evident that local and global prokaryotic diversity can be understood through species abundance curves and purely experimental approaches to solving this conundrum will be fruitless...
  13. pmc The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: northwest Atlantic through eastern tropical Pacific
    Douglas B Rusch
    J Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 5:e77. 2007
    ..Specific functional adaptations can be identified both within individual ribotypes and across the entire community, including proteorhodopsin spectral tuning and the presence or absence of the phosphate-binding gene PstS...
  14. ncbi Genetic diversity and connectivity of deep-sea hydrothermal vent metapopulations
    Robert C Vrijenhoek
    Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA 95039, USA
    Mol Ecol 19:4391-411. 2010
    ..Understanding the diversity and connectivity of vent metapopulations provides essential information for designing deep-sea preserves in regions that are under consideration for submarine mining of precious metals...
  15. ncbi Impact of anthropogenic CO2 on the CaCO3 system in the oceans
    Richard A Feely
    Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA 98115 6349, USA
    Science 305:362-6. 2004
    ..The total water column CaCO3 dissolution rate for the global oceans is approximately 0.5 +/- 0.2 petagrams of CaCO3-C per year, which is approximately 45 to 65% of the export production of CaCO3...
  16. ncbi Evolution and biogeography of deep-sea vent and seep invertebrates
    C L Van Dover
    Biology Department, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187, USA
    Science 295:1253-7. 2002
    ..The recent evolution of many vent and seep invertebrate species (<100 million years ago) suggests that Cenozoic tectonic history and oceanic circulation patterns have been important in defining contemporary biogeographic patterns...
  17. ncbi Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by anammox bacteria in the Black Sea
    Marcel M M Kuypers
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Department of Biogeochemistry, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Nature 422:608-11. 2003
    ..The widespread occurrence of ammonium consumption in suboxic marine settings indicates that anammox might be important in the oceanic nitrogen cycle...
  18. pmc Linking crenarchaeal and bacterial nitrification to anammox in the Black Sea
    Phyllis Lam
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, 28359 Bremen, Germany
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:7104-9. 2007
    ....
  19. ncbi Emergent biogeography of microbial communities in a model ocean
    Michael J Follows
    Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 54 1514 MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Science 315:1843-6. 2007
    ..This flexible representation of community structure can be used to explore relations between ecosystems, biogeochemical cycles, and climate change...
  20. ncbi Recent changes in phytoplankton communities associated with rapid regional climate change along the western Antarctic Peninsula
    Martin Montes-Hugo
    Coastal Ocean Observation Lab, Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
    Science 323:1470-3. 2009
    ..Regional changes in phytoplankton coincide with observed changes in krill (Euphausia superba) and penguin populations...
  21. pmc Intensive nitrogen loss over the Omani Shelf due to anammox coupled with dissimilatory nitrite reduction to ammonium
    Marlene M Jensen
    Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany
    ISME J 5:1660-70. 2011
    ..The close reliance of anammox on DNRA also highlights the need to take into account the effects of coupling N-transformations on oceanic N-loss and subsequent N-balance estimates...
  22. pmc Targeted metagenomics and ecology of globally important uncultured eukaryotic phytoplankton
    Marie L Cuvelier
    Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA 95039, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:14679-84. 2010
    ..Moreover, highly mosaic gene repertoires, although compositionally distinct for each major eukaryotic lineage, now seem to be an underlying facet of successful marine phytoplankton...
  23. pmc Characterization of Prochlorococcus clades from iron-depleted oceanic regions
    Douglas B Rusch
    J Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD 20855, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:16184-9. 2010
    ....
  24. pmc Comparative metagenomics of bathypelagic plankton and bottom sediment from the Sea of Marmara
    Achim Quaiser
    Unité d Ecologie, Systematique et Evolution, CNRS UMR8079, Universite Paris Sud 11, Orsay, France
    ISME J 5:285-304. 2011
    ..The Marmara sediment clustered with the soil metagenome, highlighting the common ecological role of both types of microbial communities in the degradation of organic matter and the completion of biogeochemical cycles...
  25. ncbi Projecting coral reef futures under global warming and ocean acidification
    John M Pandolfi
    Australian Research Council ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia
    Science 333:418-22. 2011
    ....
  26. ncbi The versatile epsilon-proteobacteria: key players in sulphidic habitats
    Barbara J Campbell
    College of Marine Studies, University of Delaware, Lewes, Delaware 19958, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 4:458-68. 2006
    ..These integrated perspectives provide a framework for future culture- and genomic-based studies...
  27. ncbi Cascading top-down effects of changing oceanic predator abundances
    Julia K Baum
    Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada
    J Anim Ecol 78:699-714. 2009
    ....
  28. pmc Caribbean corals in crisis: record thermal stress, bleaching, and mortality in 2005
    C Mark Eakin
    Coral Reef Watch, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA
    PLoS ONE 5:e13969. 2010
    ..In 2005, high ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean resulted in the most severe bleaching event ever recorded in the basin...
  29. ncbi Global patterns of diversity and community structure in marine bacterioplankton
    T Pommier
    Department of Natural Science, Kalmar University, SE 39182, Kalmar, Sweden
    Mol Ecol 16:867-80. 2007
    ..The general processes behind those patterns are likely to be comparable across taxa and major global biomes...
  30. pmc Man and the last great wilderness: human impact on the deep sea
    Eva Ramirez-Llodra
    Institut de Ciencies del Mar, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Barcelona, Spain
    PLoS ONE 6:e22588. 2011
    ..We finalise this review with a short discussion on protection and management methods...
  31. ncbi The oceanic sink for anthropogenic CO2
    Christopher L Sabine
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115, USA
    Science 305:367-71. 2004
    ..The current fraction of total anthropogenic CO2 emissions stored in the ocean appears to be about one-third of the long-term potential...
  32. pmc Major cellular and physiological impacts of ocean acidification on a reef building coral
    Paulina Kaniewska
    School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia
    PLoS ONE 7:e34659. 2012
    ..These widespread changes in gene expression emphasize the need to expand future studies of ocean acidification to include a wider spectrum of cellular processes, many of which may occur before impacts on calcification...
  33. pmc Marine biodiversity in the Australian region
    Alan J Butler
    CSIRO Wealth from Oceans National Research Flagship, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
    PLoS ONE 5:e11831. 2010
    ..Taxonomic expertise in Australia is unevenly distributed across taxa, and declining. Comments are given briefly on biodiversity management measures in Australia, including but not limited to marine protected areas...
  34. pmc Prokaryotic genomes and diversity in surface ocean waters: interrogating the global ocean sampling metagenome
    Erin J Biers
    Department of Marine Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 75:2221-9. 2009
    ..8 copies of the 16S rRNA gene, suggesting that these bacteria have relatively streamlined genomes in comparison to those of cultured bacteria and bacteria from other habitats (e.g., soil or acid mine drainage)...
  35. ncbi Microbial structuring of marine ecosystems
    Farooq Azam
    Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA
    Nat Rev Microbiol 5:782-91. 2007
    ..This approach to microbial oceanography is not only helpful, but is in fact indispensable...
  36. ncbi Ocean acidification disrupts the innate ability of fish to detect predator olfactory cues
    Danielle L Dixson
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Ecol Lett 13:68-75. 2010
    ....
  37. pmc Environmental factors shape sediment anammox bacterial communities in hypernutrified Jiaozhou Bay, China
    Hongyue Dang
    State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing and Centre for Bioengineering and Biotechnology, China University of Petroleum East China, 66 West Changjiang Rd, Qingdao 266555, China
    Appl Environ Microbiol 76:7036-47. 2010
    ....
  38. ncbi Phytoplankton calcification in a high-CO2 world
    M Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez
    National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, University of Southampton Waterfront Campus, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK
    Science 320:336-40. 2008
    ..Our findings show that coccolithophores are already responding and will probably continue to respond to rising atmospheric CO2 partial pressures, which has important implications for biogeochemical modeling of future oceans and climate...
  39. ncbi Enhanced biological carbon consumption in a high CO2 ocean
    U Riebesell
    Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences, IFM GEOMAR, 24105 Kiel, Germany
    Nature 450:545-8. 2007
    ....
  40. ncbi First insights into the biodiversity and biogeography of the Southern Ocean deep sea
    Angelika Brandt
    Zoological Museum Hamburg, Martin Luther King Platz 3, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
    Nature 447:307-11. 2007
    ..Our findings challenge suggestions that deep-sea diversity is depressed in the Southern Ocean and provide a basis for exploring the evolutionary significance of the varied biogeographic patterns observed in this remote environment...
  41. ncbi Mesoscale iron enrichment experiments 1993-2005: synthesis and future directions
    P W Boyd
    National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research NIWA Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, Department of Chemistry, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
    Science 315:612-7. 2007
    ..New research directions include quantification of the coupling of oceanic iron and carbon biogeochemistry...
  42. ncbi Long-term decline in krill stock and increase in salps within the Southern Ocean
    Angus Atkinson
    British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OET, UK aat bas ac uk
    Nature 432:100-3. 2004
    ..As krill densities decreased last century, salps appear to have increased in the southern part of their range. These changes have had profound effects within the Southern Ocean food web...
  43. ncbi Metabolic streamlining in an open-ocean nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium
    H James Tripp
    Ocean Sciences Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
    Nature 464:90-4. 2010
    ..The UCYN-A cyanobacterium is a paradox in evolution and adaptation to the marine environment, and is an example of the tight metabolic coupling between microorganisms in oligotrophic oceanic microbial communities...
  44. ncbi Coral reefs: corals' adaptive response to climate change
    Andrew C Baker
    Marine Program, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York 10460, USA
    Nature 430:741. 2004
    ..This adaptive shift in symbiont communities indicates that these devastated reefs could be more resistant to future thermal stress, resulting in significantly longer extinction times for surviving corals than had been previously assumed...
  45. ncbi Bacterial taxa that limit sulfur flux from the ocean
    Erinn C Howard
    Department of Microbiology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
    Science 314:649-52. 2006
    ..One-third of surface ocean bacteria harbor a DMSP demethylase homolog and thereby route a substantial fraction of global marine primary production away from DMS formation and into the marine microbial food web...
  46. ncbi Climate-driven trends in contemporary ocean productivity
    Michael J Behrenfeld
    Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA
    Nature 444:752-5. 2006
    ..The observed reductions in ocean productivity during the recent post-1999 warming period provide insight on how future climate change can alter marine food webs...
  47. ncbi How do polar marine ecosystems respond to rapid climate change?
    Oscar Schofield
    Coastal Ocean Observation Laboratory, Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
    Science 328:1520-3. 2010
    ..Robotic networks, satellites, ships, and instruments mounted on animals and ice will collect data needed to improve numerical models that can then be used to study the future of polar ecosystems as climate change progresses...
  48. pmc Replenishment of fish populations is threatened by ocean acidification
    Philip L Munday
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:12930-4. 2010
    ..Our results show that additional CO(2) absorbed into the ocean will reduce recruitment success and have far-reaching consequences for the sustainability of fish populations...
  49. ncbi Sensitivity of coccolithophores to carbonate chemistry and ocean acidification
    L Beaufort
    CEREGE, CNRS Université Aix Marseille, Avenue L Philibert BP80, 13545 Aix en Provence, Cedex 4, France
    Nature 476:80-3. 2011
    ..However, our discovery of a heavily calcified Emiliania huxleyi morphotype in modern waters with low pH highlights the complexity of assemblage-level responses to environmental forcing factors...
  50. ncbi Genome divergence in two Prochlorococcus ecotypes reflects oceanic niche differentiation
    Gabrielle Rocap
    School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
    Nature 424:1042-7. 2003
    ..Some of these genes have obvious roles in determining the relative fitness of the ecotypes in response to key environmental variables, and hence in regulating their distribution and abundance in the oceans...
  51. pmc Rapid speciation in a newly opened postglacial marine environment, the Baltic Sea
    Ricardo T Pereyra
    Department of Marine Ecology Tjarno, University of Gothenburg, Stromstad, Sweden
    BMC Evol Biol 9:70. 2009
    ..However, few studies have shown natural examples of rapid evolution giving rise to new species in marine environments...
  52. ncbi Photosynthetic architecture differs in coastal and oceanic diatoms
    Robert F Strzepek
    Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC Canada V6T 1Z4
    Nature 431:689-92. 2004
    ..This adaptation probably facilitated the colonization of the open ocean by diatoms, and contributes to their persistence in this iron-impoverished environment...
  53. pmc Global patterns and predictions of seafloor biomass using random forests
    Chih Lin Wei
    Department of Oceanography, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e15323. 2010
    ..This biomass census and associated maps are vital components of mechanistic deep-sea food web models and global carbon cycling, and as such provide fundamental information that can be incorporated into evidence-based management...
  54. ncbi Rapid worldwide depletion of predatory fish communities
    Ransom A Myers
    Biology Department, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1
    Nature 423:280-3. 2003
    ..Our analysis suggests that management based on recent data alone may be misleading, and provides minimum estimates for unexploited communities, which could serve as the 'missing baseline' needed for future restoration efforts...
  55. pmc Diversity and distribution of marine microbial eukaryotes in the Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas
    C Lovejoy
    Québec Océan and Département de Biologie, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC, Canada G1K 7P4
    Appl Environ Microbiol 72:3085-95. 2006
    ..The cold, stable Arctic Ocean is a threatened environment, and climate change could result in significant loss of global microbial biodiversity...
  56. ncbi Global phylogeography of marine Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus reveals a distinct partitioning of lineages among oceanic biomes
    Katrin Zwirglmaier
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
    Environ Microbiol 10:147-61. 2008
    ..This clearly reiterates the idea of spatial partitioning of individual cyanobacterial lineages, but at the global scale...
  57. ncbi Southern Ocean deep-water carbon export enhanced by natural iron fertilization
    Raymond T Pollard
    National Oceanography Centre Southampton, Natural Environment Research Council and University of Southampton, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK
    Nature 457:577-80. 2009
    ..Large losses of purposefully added iron can explain the lower efficiency of the induced bloom(6). The discrepancy between the blooms naturally supplied with iron may result in part from an underestimate of horizontal iron supply...
  58. ncbi Coral bleaching: thermal adaptation in reef coral symbionts
    Rob Rowan
    University of Guam Marine Laboratory, Mangilao, Guam 96923, USA
    Nature 430:742. 2004
    ..If other coral species can host these or similar Symbiodinium taxa, they might adapt to warmer habitats relatively easily...
  59. ncbi Evaluating and ranking the vulnerability of global marine ecosystems to anthropogenic threats
    Benjamin S Halpern
    National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, 735 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, USA
    Conserv Biol 21:1301-15. 2007
    ..Additionally, it can be easily modified, updated as new data become available, and scaled to local or regional settings, which would facilitate informed and transparent conservation priority setting...
  60. pmc Climate warming, marine protected areas and the ocean-scale integrity of coral reef ecosystems
    Nicholas A J Graham
    School of Marine Science and Technology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 3:e3039. 2008
    ....
  61. pmc The marine viromes of four oceanic regions
    Florent E Angly
    Department of Biology, San Diego State University, San Diego, California, USA
    PLoS Biol 4:e368. 2006
    ..These results support the idea that viruses are widely dispersed and that local environmental conditions enrich for certain viral types through selective pressure...
  62. ncbi Reduced calcification of marine plankton in response to increased atmospheric CO2
    U Riebesell
    Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany
    Nature 407:364-7. 2000
    ..As the process of calcification releases CO2 to the atmosphere, the response observed here could potentially act as a negative feedback on atmospheric CO2 levels...
  63. ncbi Feast and famine--microbial life in the deep-sea bed
    Bo Barker Jørgensen
    Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, Bremen D 28359, Germany
    Nat Rev Microbiol 5:770-81. 2007
    ..Here, we review microbial biodiversity and function in these intriguing environments...
  64. ncbi Deep-sea hydrothermal vents: potential hot spots for natural products discovery?
    Christopher C Thornburg
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA
    J Nat Prod 73:489-99. 2010
    ....
  65. pmc Dynamic patterns and ecological impacts of declining ocean pH in a high-resolution multi-year dataset
    J Timothy Wootton
    Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, 1101 East 57th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:18848-53. 2008
    ..Our results indicate that pH decline is proceeding at a more rapid rate than previously predicted in some areas, and that this decline has ecological consequences for near shore benthic ecosystems...
  66. ncbi Ocean acidification and its potential effects on marine ecosystems
    John M Guinotte
    Marine Conservation Biology Institute, Bellevue, WA 98004 2947, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1134:320-42. 2008
    ..Political will and significant large-scale investment in clean-energy technologies are essential if we are to avoid the most damaging effects of human-induced climate change, including ocean acidification...
  67. pmc Ocean acidification impairs olfactory discrimination and homing ability of a marine fish
    Philip L Munday
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:1848-52. 2009
    ..If acidification continues unabated, the impairment of sensory ability will reduce population sustainability of many marine species, with potentially profound consequences for marine diversity...
  68. ncbi Reliability of flipper-banded penguins as indicators of climate change
    Claire Saraux
    Universite de Strasbourg, Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue Becquerel, 67087 Strasbourg, France
    Nature 469:203-6. 2011
    ..In addition, our understanding of the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems based on flipper-band data should be reconsidered...
  69. pmc Toward molecular trait-based ecology through integration of biogeochemical, geographical and metagenomic data
    Jeroen Raes
    Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany
    Mol Syst Biol 7:473. 2011
    ..Together, our results show that the functional community composition derived from metagenomes is an important quantitative readout for molecular trait-based biogeography and ecology...
  70. ncbi Aldehyde suppression of copepod recruitment in blooms of a ubiquitous planktonic diatom
    Adrianna Ianora
    Ecophysiology Laboratory, Stazione Zoologica A Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Naples, Italy
    Nature 429:403-7. 2004
    ..Such a transgenerational plant-herbivore interaction could explain the recurringly inefficient use of a predictable, potentially valuable food resource--the spring diatom bloom--by marine zooplankton...
  71. ncbi Pelagic protected areas: the missing dimension in ocean conservation
    Edward T Game
    The Nature Conservancy, South Brisbane, QLD 4101, Australia
    Trends Ecol Evol 24:360-9. 2009
    ..Debate over the efficacy of protected areas relative to other conservation measures cannot be resolved without further implementation of MPAs in the pelagic ocean...
  72. ncbi When gaps really are gaps: statistical phylogeography of hydrothermal vent invertebrates
    Asta Audzijonyte
    Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, 7700 Sandholdt Road, Moss Landing, California 95039, USA
    Evolution 64:2369-84. 2010
    ..The simulation approaches presented here might be useful for testing the significance of inferred phylogeographic gaps in other species...
  73. ncbi Impact of near-future ocean acidification on echinoderms
    S Dupont
    Department of Marine Ecology, The Sven Lovén Centre for Marine Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Kristineberg, Sweden
    Ecotoxicology 19:449-62. 2010
    ..g. pH, temperature, toxicants) and organism health. However, available data allow us to conclude that near-future OA will have negative impact on echinoderm taxa with likely significant consequences at the ecosystem level...
  74. ncbi Deep-sea natural products
    Danielle Skropeta
    School of Chemistry, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia
    Nat Prod Rep 25:1131-66. 2008
    ..Relevant synthetic studies on the deep-sea natural products have also been included...
  75. pmc The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: expanding the universe of protein families
    Shibu Yooseph
    J Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 5:e16. 2007
    ..Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature...
  76. ncbi A Southern Hemisphere bathyal fauna is distributed in latitudinal bands
    Timothy D O'Hara
    Sciences Department, Museum Victoria, Melbourne 3001, Australia
    Curr Biol 21:226-30. 2011
    ..A reliable biogeography is fundamental to establishing a representative network of marine reserves across the world's oceans...
  77. pmc Abundance, diversity, and activity of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes in the coastal Arctic ocean in summer and winter
    Glenn D Christman
    School of Marine Science and Policy, University of Delaware, 700 Pilottown Rd, Lewes, DE 19958, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 77:2026-34. 2011
    ..These results suggest that ammonium concentrations were important in determining the rates of ammonia oxidation and the abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria and Crenarchaea...
  78. ncbi Abyssal food limitation, ecosystem structure and climate change
    Craig R Smith
    Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii, 1000 Pope Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
    Trends Ecol Evol 23:518-28. 2008
    ..Abyssal ecosystem response thus must be considered in assessments of the environmental impacts of global warming and ocean fertilization...
  79. ncbi An evaluation of the effect of recent temperature variability on the prediction of coral bleaching events
    Simon D Donner
    Department of Geography, 133 1984 West Mall, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z2, Canada
    Ecol Appl 21:1718-30. 2011
    ....
  80. ncbi World's largest macroalgal bloom caused by expansion of seaweed aquaculture in China
    Dongyan Liu
    Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research for Sustainable Development, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 17th Chunhui Road, Laishan District, Yantai, Shandong 264003, PR China
    Mar Pollut Bull 58:888-95. 2009
    ..Given similar oceanographic conditions to those that occurred in 2008, these green-tides may re-occur unless mitigation measures such as those proposed here are taken...
  81. ncbi Metatranscriptomics reveals unique microbial small RNAs in the ocean's water column
    Yanmei Shi
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Nature 459:266-9. 2009
    ....
  82. ncbi The nature and extent of organisms in vessel sea-chests: A protected mechanism for marine bioinvasions
    Ashley D M Coutts
    Cawthron Institute, Private Bag 2, Nelson, New Zealand
    Mar Pollut Bull 54:875-86. 2007
    ..These findings emphasise the need to assess and manage biosecurity risks for entire vessels rather than different mechanisms (i.e., ballast water, hull fouling, sea-chests, etc.) in isolation...
  83. ncbi Paleo-perspectives on ocean acidification
    Carles Pelejero
    Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats ICREA and Institut de Ciències del Mar, CSIC, Pg Maritim de la Barceloneta, 37 49, E 08003, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
    Trends Ecol Evol 25:332-44. 2010
    ..We argue that ocean conditions are already more extreme than those experienced by marine organisms and ecosystems for millions of years, emphasising the urgent need to adopt policies that drastically reduce CO(2) emissions...
  84. pmc Ocean acidification at high latitudes: potential effects on functioning of the Antarctic bivalve Laternula elliptica
    Vonda Cummings
    National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington, New Zealand
    PLoS ONE 6:e16069. 2011
    ..elliptica CHS gene expression provides evidence for biological control over the shell formation process, which may enable some degree of adaptation or acclimation to future ocean acidification scenarios...
  85. pmc Endemicity, biogeograhy, composition, and community structure on a northeast pacific seamount
    Craig R McClain
    Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e4141. 2009
    ....
  86. pmc Marine biodiversity in South Africa: an evaluation of current states of knowledge
    Charles L Griffiths
    Zoology Department, Marine Biology Research Centre, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, South Africa
    PLoS ONE 5:e12008. 2010
    ..Over 120 introduced or cryptogenic marine species have been recorded, but most of these are confined to the few harbors and sheltered sites along the coast...
  87. ncbi Coral disease in Micronesian reefs: a link between disease prevalence and host abundance
    Roxanna L Myers
    University of Guam Marine Laboratory, UOG Station, Mangilao, Guam 96923
    Dis Aquat Organ 87:97-104. 2009
    ..As the coral genera currently most affected by diseases are those providing the most structure to Guam's reefs, disease has the potential to have significant long-term effects, highlighting an urgent need for proactive management...
  88. ncbi Seabird satellite tracking validates the use of latitudinal isoscapes to depict predators' foraging areas in the Southern Ocean
    Audrey Jaeger
    Centre d Etudes Biologiques de Chize, UPR 1934 du CNRS, 79360 Villiers en Bois, France
    Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 24:3456-60. 2010
    ..The combination of device deployments with sampling of relevant tissues for isotopic analysis appears to be a powerful tool for investigating consumers' isoscapes at various spatio-temporal scales...
  89. pmc Antarctic marine biodiversity--what do we know about the distribution of life in the Southern Ocean?
    Huw J Griffiths
    British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 5:e11683. 2010
    ..Taxa such as mollusks and echinoderms are well represented within existing datasets with high numbers of georeferenced records. Other taxa, including the species-rich nematodes, are represented by just a handful of digital records...
  90. ncbi Porites ulcerative white spot disease: description, prevalence, and host range of a new coral disease affecting Indo-Pacific reefs
    Laurie J H Raymundo
    Silliman University Marine Laboratory, Dumaguete City 6200, Philippines
    Dis Aquat Organ 56:95-104. 2003
    ..Poritids are dominant Indo-Pacific reef builders; a disease targeting this genus could cause major shifts in community structure over time. This report contributes to the limited knowledge of PUWS impacts in this region...
  91. ncbi Activity rhythms in the deep-sea: a chronobiological approach
    Jacopo Aguzzi
    Instituto de Ciencias del Mar CSIC, Paseo Maritimo de la Barceloneta, 37 49 08003 Barcelona, Spain
    Front Biosci (Landmark Ed) 16:131-50. 2011
    ..Permanent video observatories are, to date, one of the most important tools for marine chronobiology in terms of species recognition and animals' movement tracking...
  92. ncbi Temporal change in deep-sea benthic ecosystems: a review of the evidence from recent time-series studies
    A G Glover
    Zoology Department, The Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom
    Adv Mar Biol 58:1-95. 2010
    ..g. cabled observatories) with spatial capabilities (e.g. autonomous vehicles undertaking image surveys of the seabed)...
  93. ncbi Genome streamlining in a cosmopolitan oceanic bacterium
    Stephen J Giovannoni
    Department of Microbiology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
    Science 309:1242-5. 2005
    ..P. ubique has no pseudogenes, introns, transposons, extrachromosomal elements, or inteins; few paralogs; and the shortest intergenic spacers yet observed for any cell...
  94. pmc Colloquium paper: ecological extinction and evolution in the brave new ocean
    Jeremy B C Jackson
    Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 0244, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:11458-65. 2008
    ..Halting and ultimately reversing these trends will require rapid and fundamental changes in fisheries, agricultural practice, and the emissions of greenhouse gases on a global scale...
  95. ncbi Global iron connections between desert dust, ocean biogeochemistry, and climate
    T D Jickells
    School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR47TJ, UK
    Science 308:67-71. 2005
    ..Here we review the key components of this cycle, identifying critical uncertainties and priorities for future research...
  96. ncbi Oceanic variability and coastal topography shape genetic structure in a long-dispersing sea urchin
    Sam C Banks
    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales 2109, Australia
    Ecology 88:3055-64. 2007
    ..If proven consistent across species, our findings suggest that the optimal scale for fisheries management and reserve design should vary among localities in relation to regional oceanographic variability and coastal geography...
  97. ncbi A ubiquitous thermoacidophilic archaeon from deep-sea hydrothermal vents
    Anna Louise Reysenbach
    Department of Biology, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon 97201, USA
    Nature 442:444-7. 2006
    ..In addition, we demonstrate that this isolate constitutes up to 15% of the archaeal population, providing evidence that thermoacidophiles may be key players in the sulphur and iron cycling at deep-sea vents...
  98. doi Ocean science. Under-resourced, under threat
    Anthony J Richardson
    Climate Adaptations Flagship Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Post Office Box 120, Cleveland, Queensland 4163, Australia
    Science 320:1294-5. 2008
  99. pmc The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: metagenomic characterization of viruses within aquatic microbial samples
    Shannon J Williamson
    J Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, Maryland, USA
    PLoS ONE 3:e1456. 2008
    ....
  100. doi Environment. Ocean iron fertilization--moving forward in a sea of uncertainty
    Ken O Buesseler
    Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA
    Science 319:162. 2008
  101. ncbi Genome sequence of Silicibacter pomeroyi reveals adaptations to the marine environment
    Mary Ann Moran
    Department of Marine Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA
    Nature 432:910-3. 2004
    ..This bacterium has a physiology distinct from that of marine oligotrophs, adding a new strategy to the recognized repertoire for coping with a nutrient-poor ocean...

Research Grants15

  1. MARINE AND FRESHWATER BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES CENTER
    Lora Fleming; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  2. BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS AND MEMBRANE PROTEINS
    Koji Nakanishi; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..The prostaglandin receptors will be studied by introducing photoaffinity labels into readily available prostaglandins by a general route, and use these as probes for searching for the respective receptors. ..
  3. ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF IRON-SULFUR AND RELATED PROTEINS
    Louis Noodleman; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Calculations and analysis of vibrational spectra and of hyperfine spectra compared with experiment are important indicators of stable intermediates over the catalytic cycle. All changes are in italics. ..
  4. Center for Subtropical & Tropical Oceans & Human Health Research in Marine Scienc
    LORA ELDERKIN FLEMING; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..abstract_text> ..
  5. Investigations of the Bioinorganic Chemistry of Iron: New Siderophores
    Alison Butler; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..abstract_text> ..
  6. Quantitation of protein turnover in the human adult lens using the 14C bomb-pulse
    BRUCE BUCHHOLZ; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  7. COMMERICAL PRODUCTION OF OKADAIC ACID FROM PROROCENTRUM
    Steve Morton; Fiscal Year: 1992
    ..We will combine studies of innovative culturing techniques and physiological manipulation in order to optimize and economize okadaic acid production in this species...
  8. 2010 Oceans and Human Health Gordon Research Conference
    EDWARD ALLEN LAWS; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  9. Discovery of novel signaling components targeted by Vibrio
    Kim Orth; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Results from this application will be used as preliminary data for the submission of a future RO1 application. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  10. Anti-Smallpox Therapeutics from Marine Micoorganisms
    TREVOR CASTOR; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Due to diverse microenvironments, oceans and seas contain a wealth of microorganisms that are genetically different from their terrestrial counterparts and ..
  11. ANTIAIDS AGENTS FROM MARINE ORGANISMS
    Mark Hamann; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..These Anti-HIV and AIDS-OI pharmacophores may then be used to develop sophisticated antiinfective libraries using combinatorial or parallel synthesis. ..
  12. AB 3730XL, 96 Cap DNA Analyzer
    Mitchell Sogin; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Since 1997, a users' committee has guided use of the facility, which is managed by a faculty member in the Bay Paul Center. Foundation funds have been reserved to pay for five years of maintenance. ..
  13. Pacific Northwest Center for Oceans and Human Health
    Elaine Faustman; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..This is responsive to the directives in the NSF and NIEHS sponsored roundtable on Oceans and Human Health. ..
  14. NEW DRUGS FROM SYMBIOTIC MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES
    BARBARA JAVOR; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..abstract_text> ..
  15. APPROACHES TO CHARACTERIZATION OF ANTIINFECTIVE AGENTS
    Mark Hamann; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..SAR studies will be conducted utilizing chemical and microbial transformations of biologically active secondary metabolites combined with molecular modeling studies. ..