passive euthanasia

Summary

Summary: Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.

Top Publications

  1. ncbi [Euthanasia]
    Carlos R Gherardi
    Division Terapia Intensiva, Hospital de Clinicas Jose de San Martin, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires
    Medicina (B Aires) 63:63-9. 2003
  2. ncbi Ethical principles in end-of-life decisions in different European countries
    Jean Louis Vincent
    Department of Intensive Care, Erasme Hospital, Free University of Brussels, Belgium
    Swiss Med Wkly 134:65-8. 2004
  3. ncbi Withdrawing life-sustaining treatment: ethical considerations
    Sharon Reynolds
    Joint Centre for Bioethics, University of Toronto, 88 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L4, Canada
    Surg Clin North Am 87:919-36, viii. 2007
  4. ncbi Jewish law and end-of-life decision making: a case report
    Craig D Blinderman
    Palliative Care Service, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA
    J Clin Ethics 18:384-90. 2007
  5. ncbi Dilemmas surrounding passive euthanasia--a Malaysian perspective
    Norchaya Talib
    Faculty of Law, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    Med Law 24:605-13. 2005
  6. pmc Passive euthanasia
    E Garrard
    Centre for Professional Ethics, Keele University, Keele Hall, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK
    J Med Ethics 31:64-8. 2005
  7. doi On acts, omissions and responsibility
    John Coggon
    Centre for Social Ethics and Policy and Institute for Science, Ethics and Innovation, School of Law, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
    J Med Ethics 34:576-9. 2008
  8. ncbi The ethics of killing and letting die: active and passive euthanasia
    H V McLachlan
    School of Law and Social Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA, UK
    J Med Ethics 34:636-8. 2008
  9. ncbi The moral distinction between killing and letting die in medical cases
    Joachim Asscher
    School of Philosophy and Bioethics, Monash University, VIC 3800, Australia
    Bioethics 22:278-85. 2008
  10. ncbi Hastening death and the boundaries of the self
    Lynn A Jansen
    The John J Conley Department of Ethics, St Vincent s, Manhattan, 153 West 11th Street, New York, NY 10011, USA
    Bioethics 20:105-11. 2006

Detail Information

Publications173 found, 100 shown here

  1. ncbi [Euthanasia]
    Carlos R Gherardi
    Division Terapia Intensiva, Hospital de Clinicas Jose de San Martin, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires
    Medicina (B Aires) 63:63-9. 2003
    ....
  2. ncbi Ethical principles in end-of-life decisions in different European countries
    Jean Louis Vincent
    Department of Intensive Care, Erasme Hospital, Free University of Brussels, Belgium
    Swiss Med Wkly 134:65-8. 2004
    ..Here we will discuss the current situation across Europe, based on the findings from three large international studies...
  3. ncbi Withdrawing life-sustaining treatment: ethical considerations
    Sharon Reynolds
    Joint Centre for Bioethics, University of Toronto, 88 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L4, Canada
    Surg Clin North Am 87:919-36, viii. 2007
    ..Understanding of the limits of treatment, expertise in palliation of symptoms, skillful communication, and careful orchestration of controllable events can help to manage the withdrawal of life support appropriately...
  4. ncbi Jewish law and end-of-life decision making: a case report
    Craig D Blinderman
    Palliative Care Service, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA
    J Clin Ethics 18:384-90. 2007
  5. ncbi Dilemmas surrounding passive euthanasia--a Malaysian perspective
    Norchaya Talib
    Faculty of Law, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    Med Law 24:605-13. 2005
    ..However due to the advance in technology and its corresponding ability in prolonging life, in Malaysia passive euthanasia presents more of a dilemma...
  6. pmc Passive euthanasia
    E Garrard
    Centre for Professional Ethics, Keele University, Keele Hall, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK
    J Med Ethics 31:64-8. 2005
    The idea of passive euthanasia has recently been attacked in a particularly clear and explicit way by an "Ethics Task Force" established by the European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) in February 2001...
  7. doi On acts, omissions and responsibility
    John Coggon
    Centre for Social Ethics and Policy and Institute for Science, Ethics and Innovation, School of Law, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
    J Med Ethics 34:576-9. 2008
  8. ncbi The ethics of killing and letting die: active and passive euthanasia
    H V McLachlan
    School of Law and Social Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA, UK
    J Med Ethics 34:636-8. 2008
    In their account of passive euthanasia, Garrard and Wilkinson present arguments that might lead one to overlook significant moral differences between killing and letting die. To kill is not the same as to let die...
  9. ncbi The moral distinction between killing and letting die in medical cases
    Joachim Asscher
    School of Philosophy and Bioethics, Monash University, VIC 3800, Australia
    Bioethics 22:278-85. 2008
    ..Medical examples are frequently complicated because patients' autonomous choices impact upon medical practitioners' surrounding responsibility...
  10. ncbi Hastening death and the boundaries of the self
    Lynn A Jansen
    The John J Conley Department of Ethics, St Vincent s, Manhattan, 153 West 11th Street, New York, NY 10011, USA
    Bioethics 20:105-11. 2006
    ..The constitution of the self is fixed in large measure by our concepts and social conventions, and these do not always provide determinate grounds for delimiting the boundaries of the self...
  11. ncbi To kill is not the same as to let die: a reply to Coggon
    H V McLachlan
    School of Law and Social Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK
    J Med Ethics 35:456-8. 2009
    Coggon's remarks on a previous paper on active and passive euthanasia elicit a clarification and an elaboration of the argument in support of the claim that there is a moral difference between killing and letting die...
  12. ncbi Withdrawal of care in Japan
    Kaoruko Aita
    Department of Social Gerontology, School of Health Sciences and Nursing, The University of Tokyo, 7 3 1 Hongo, Bunkyo ku, Tokyo 113 0033, Japan
    Lancet 368:12-4. 2006
  13. ncbi Intentionally hastening death by withholding or withdrawing treatment
    Georg Bosshard
    Institute of Legal Medicine, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Wien Klin Wochenschr 118:322-6. 2006
    ..This study aims to provide empirical data on physicians' intentions in withholding and withdrawing treatment, and to discuss possible implications for the ethical debate...
  14. ncbi Practices of anaesthesiologists with regard to withholding and withdrawal of life support from the critically ill in Turkey
    L Iyilikci
    Department of Anaesthesiology, School of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey
    Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 48:457-62. 2004
    ..To determine practices of Turkish anaesthesiologists with regard to withholding and withdrawal of life support from the critically ill...
  15. ncbi The medical provision of hydration and nutrition: two very different outcomes in Victoria and Florida
    Danuta Mendelson
    School of Law, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria
    J Law Med 11:282-91. 2004
    ..The article analyses the two cases and their outcomes from legal, medical and ethical perspectives...
  16. ncbi A life not worth living?
    Craig Paterson
    Department of Philosophy, Providence College, Rhode Island, USA
    Stud Christ Ethics 16:1-20. 2003
    ..It is to the use of such dialectical reasoning, supportive of the status of human life as such a basic human good, that the article is primarily concerned to draw out and articulate...
  17. ncbi Death of John Paul II and the basic human care for the sick and the dying
    Juan R Velez G
    Ethics Med 21:167-77. 2005
    ..He chose to forego disproportionate medical treatment when there was no reasonable hope of recovery. At that point he continued to receive ordinary medical care, together with basic human and spiritual care...
  18. pmc Ethics roundtable debate: withdrawal of tube feeding in a patient with persistent vegetative state where the patients wishes are unclear and there is family dissension
    Tom Buckley
    Intensive Care Unit, Princess Margaret Hospital, Lai Chi Kok, Kowloon, Hong Kong
    Crit Care 8:79-84. 2004
    ..We examine a case where the State's interests come into play, forcing a controversial resolution...
  19. ncbi [The debate about the right to die]
    Juan Pablo Beca
    Centro de Bioética, Facultad de Medicina, Clinica Alemana, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile
    Rev Med Chil 133:601-6. 2005
    ..The physician's duty with the patient at the end of his life is to assist him in dying according to his values and to minimize his distress...
  20. ncbi [Insight into end-of-life decisions in newborns in Flanders, Belgium]
    A A E Verhagen
    Universitair Medisch Centrum Groningen, Beatrix Kinderkliniek, Postbus 30 001, 9700 RB Groningen
    Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 150:355-7. 2006
    ..The advice of the committee to the prosecuting authorities will be crucial. It is expected that this change will increase the willingness to report cases...
  21. ncbi Life support withdrawal: communication and conflict
    Sally A Norton
    Center for Clinical Research on Aging, University of Rochester School of Nursing, Rochester, NY, USA
    Am J Crit Care 12:548-55. 2003
    ..Yet communication can be particularly difficult during stressful situations such as when a family member is critically ill. This is especially the case when families are faced with choices about forgoing life-sustaining treatment...
  22. pmc Euthanasia, efficiency, and the historical distinction between killing a patient and allowing a patient to die
    J P Bishop
    Peninsula Medical School, Knowledge Spa, Royal Cornwall Hospital, Truro TR1 3HD
    J Med Ethics 32:220-4. 2006
  23. ncbi Revisiting the problem of Jewish bioethics: the case of terminal care
    Y Michael Barilan
    Department of Internal Medicine B, Meir Hospital, Kfar Saba, Israel
    Kennedy Inst Ethics J 13:141-68. 2003
    ..Direct and active actions that kill are prohibited; certain forms of passive euthanasia and contrivances that terminate life support without needing direct human action are accepted.
  24. ncbi End-of-life decisions in Swedish ICUs. How do physicians from the admitting department reason?
    Mia Svantesson
    Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Centre for Caring Sciences, Orebro University Hospital, SE 701 85 Orebro, Sweden
    Intensive Crit Care Nurs 19:241-51. 2003
    ..To study how physicians from the admitting department reason during the decision-making process to forego life-sustaining treatment of patients in intensive care units (ICUs)...
  25. ncbi [Death in an intensive care unit. Influence of life support withholding and withdrawal]
    Carlos Gherardi
    Division Terapia Intensiva, Hospital de Clinicas Jose de San Martin, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Medicina (B Aires) 66:237-41. 2006
    ..Further research should analyze the influence that moral perception of withdrawal as inconvenient in our society, has over our findings...
  26. ncbi Obligations to treat, personal autonomy, and artificial nutrition and hydration
    Raj Mohindra
    Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne
    Clin Med 6:271-3. 2006
    ..The decision of the Court of Appeal in the case of R v General Medical Council (GMC) ex parte Burke (2005) is explored...
  27. ncbi The Schiavo and Korp cases: conceptualising end-of-life decision-making
    Loane Skene
    Faculty of Law, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic, Australia
    J Law Med 13:223-9. 2005
    ..That deflects attention from the fundamental legal principle that whatever a patient or the relatives want, they are not legally entitled to demand treatment that doctors consider futile in the circumstances...
  28. ncbi Conjoined twins: can the state mandate sacrifice surgery?
    L Marcel Stewart
    Howard University School of Law, Washington, DC, USA
    Howard Law J 45:675-96. 2002
  29. ncbi [Allowing a patient in a vegetative state to die in hospital under the direction of a nursing-home physician]
    J C M Lavrijsen
    Stichting De Zorgboog, Postbus 16, 5760 AA Bakel
    Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 149:947-50. 2005
    ..A hopeless vegetative state can be prevented by using these transmural possibilities for cooperation, including an early input of knowledge and experience about the long-term course of a vegetative state...
  30. ncbi Rejecting the Baby Doe rules and defending a "negative" analysis of the Best Interests Standard
    Loretta M Kopelman
    Department of Medical Humanities, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858, USA
    J Med Philos 30:331-52. 2005
    ..In these ways, they are inferior to the older Best Interests Standard. A "negative" analysis of the Best Interests Standard is articulated and defended for decision-making for all incompetent individuals...
  31. ncbi Medical end-of-life decisions for children in the Netherlands
    Astrid M Vrakking
    Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC and Erasmus MC Sophia, Children s Hospital, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 159:802-9. 2005
    ..Most end-of-life decision-making studies have, until now, involved either the general population or newborn infants...
  32. ncbi After Schiavo: next issue for nursing ethics
    Jacqulyn Kay Hall
    P O Box 357, Vega, TX 79092, USA
    JONAS Healthc Law Ethics Regul 7:94-8. 2005
  33. ncbi [End-of-life decisions and reluctant treatment of newborns on the borderline of viability in the Netherlands]
    L A A Kollée
    Universitair Medisch Centrum St Radboud, Universitair Kinderziekenhuis, Postbus 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen
    Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 149:2032-4. 2005
    ..Behind the stable frequency of end-of-life decisions, difficult ethical issues remain to be solved...
  34. ncbi Physicians' religiosity and end-of-life care attitudes and behaviors
    Neil S Wenger
    UCLA Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, 911 Broxton Plaza, Suite 309, Los Angeles, CA 90095 1736, USA
    Mt Sinai J Med 71:335-43. 2004
    ..We surveyed physicians of one religion to describe the relationship between religiosity and end-of-life care...
  35. ncbi [No conspicuous changes in the practice of medical end-of-life decision-making for neonates and infants in the Netherlands in 2001 as compared to 1995]
    A M Vrakking
    Erasmus MC, afd Maatschappelijke Gezondheidszorg, Rotterdam
    Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 149:2047-51. 2005
    ..To establish whether the practice of end-of-life decision-making for neonates and infants under the age of 1 in the Netherlands in 2000 was different from that in 1995...
  36. ncbi [Euthanasia in patients with cancer and the continuous-care providers]
    Carlos Camps Herrero
    Servicio de Oncologia Medica, Consorcio Hospital General Universitario de Valencia, Espana
    Clin Transl Oncol 7:278-84. 2005
    ....
  37. ncbi When vitalism is dead wrong: the discrimination against and torture of incompetent patients by compulsory life-sustaining treatment
    Alicia R Ouellette
    Albany Law School, USA
    Indiana Law J 79:1-55. 2004
  38. ncbi Pacemakers and end-of-life decisions
    David McQuoid-Mason
    University of KwaZulu Natal
    S Afr Med J 95:566, 568. 2005
  39. ncbi Strategic ambiguities in the process of consent: role of the family in decisions to forgo life-sustaining treatment for incompetent elderly patients
    Chun Yan Tse
    United Christian Hospital, 130 Hip Wo Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
    J Med Philos 29:207-23. 2004
    ..Without embracing relativism, the paper argues that the Hong Kong model offers an instructive example of how strategic ambiguities can both make good sense within particular cultural context and serve important moral goals...
  40. ncbi Charting a course through difficult legislative waters: tribunal decisions on life-sustaining measures
    Lindy Willmott
    Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology
    J Law Med 12:441-54. 2005
    ....
  41. ncbi Caring for patients and families at the end of life: withdrawal of intensive care in the patient's home
    Sue Mann
    Clinical Charge Nurse, Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Middlemore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand
    N Z Med J 117:U935. 2004
    ..To describe our experience of transporting 17 intensive care patients home to die...
  42. ncbi Ethical issues in the management of geriatric cardiac patients. Special report: Terri's Tale: dispelling the myths in the Terri Schiavo Ordeal
    Lofty L Basta
    University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, and Project GRACE Guidelines for Resuscitation and Care at End of Life, Clearwater, FL 33756, USA
    Am J Geriatr Cardiol 14:265-8. 2005
  43. ncbi End-of-life decisions: ethical principles
    John Myers
    Origins 35:248-53. 2005
  44. ncbi [Assisted dying and the principle of double effect]
    Martin Klein
    Wien Klin Wochenschr 114:415-21. 2002
    ..Therefore the rule of double effect is not applicable. Indirect and direct active euthanasia cannot be ethically distinguished by resorting to the doctrine of double effect...
  45. ncbi Family beliefs about end-of-life decisions: an interpersonal perspective
    Ronit D Leichtentritt
    Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Isreal
    Death Stud 26:567-94. 2002
    ..These family beliefs and communication patterns have practical implications for professionals working with families that are making end-of-life decisions..
  46. doi Need to prioritise: end-of-life decision-making in India
    A Singh
    Eur Respir J 31:222-3. 2008
  47. ncbi End-of-life decision-making in respiratory intermediate care units: a European survey
    S Nava
    Respiratory Intensive Care Unit, Fondazione S Maugeri, I R C C S, Istituto Scientifico di Pavia, Via Maugeri 10, 27100 Pavia, Italy
    Eur Respir J 30:156-64. 2007
    ..Withholding of treatment, do-not-intubate/do-not-resuscitate orders and noninvasive mechanical ventilation as the ventilatory care ceiling are the most common procedures. Competent patients are often involved, together with nurses...
  48. ncbi Physician medical decision-making at the end of life in newborns: insight into implementation at 2 Dutch centers
    A A Eduard Verhagen
    Department of Pediatrics, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30 001, 9700 RB, Groningen, The Netherlands
    Pediatrics 120:e20-8. 2007
    ..Our purpose was to provide detailed information about how and when the implementation of end-of-life decisions, which are based on quality-of-life considerations, takes place...
  49. pmc Media coverage of the persistent vegetative state and end-of-life decision-making
    E Racine
    Neuroethics Research Unit, Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Neurology 71:1027-32. 2008
    ..This study examined print media coverage of these features of the case...
  50. ncbi Withholding and withdrawal of therapy in New Zealand intensive care units (ICUs): a survey of clinical directors
    K M Ho
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, North Shore Hospital, Auckland 1309, New Zealand
    Anaesth Intensive Care 32:781-6. 2004
    ..Hospice ward or the patient's home was the preferred place for palliative care in 32% of the responses...
  51. ncbi [End-of-life care in a Spanish Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: staff and parental evaluation]
    A Tagarro García
    Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Hospital Infantil La Paz Madrid España
    An Pediatr (Barc) 68:346-52. 2008
    ..To evaluate end-of-life care in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)...
  52. ncbi [Withholding and withdrawing life-prolonging treatment--from the bioethical and legal viewpoints]
    Masako Minooka
    Dept of Biomedical Ethics, School of Health Science and Nursing, The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine
    Gan To Kagaku Ryoho 33:267-9. 2006
    ..5) To deliberate the difference between ethical and legal judgment, an interdisciplinary approach should be carried out. (6) To achieve consensus among the people, the importance of an Advanced-Directive should prevail widely...
  53. ncbi Translating psychosocial insight into ethical discussions supportive of families in end-of-life decision-making
    Larry W Foster
    Department of Social Work, Cleveland State University, OH 44115, USA
    Soc Work Health Care 35:37-51. 2002
    ..Contributions of a social worker and bioethicist are illustrated...
  54. ncbi End stage renal disease by patients with malignancy--ethical problems
    K Marczewski
    Department of Ethics, Skubiszewski Medical University of Lublin, Poland
    Adv Med Sci 51:127-32. 2006
    ..It is more than desired that the decision acquires the approval of the patient's family but in the situation when it is not possible the doctor decide. In the doubtful cases we should take decisions "towards life"...
  55. ncbi How should Christians make judgments at the edge of life and death?
    Mark J Cherry
    Department of Philosophy, Campus Mailbox 844, St Edward s University, 3001 South Congress Avenue, Austin, TX 78704, USA
    Christ Bioeth 12:1-10. 2006
  56. pmc Withholding the artificial administration of fluids and food from elderly patients with dementia: ethnographic study
    Anne Mei The
    Department of Social Medicine, Institute for Research in Extramural Medicine, Vrije University Medical Centre, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, Netherlands
    BMJ 325:1326. 2002
    ..To clarify the practice of withholding the artificial administration of fluids and food from elderly patients with dementia in nursing homes...
  57. ncbi Shared decision making about withdrawing treatment
    Stephen Workman
    JAMA 289:981; author reply 981. 2003
  58. ncbi The best interests test at the end of life on PICU: a plea for a family centred approach
    D Inwald
    Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, 7th Floor, QEQM Building, St Mary s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Praed Street, London W2 1NY, UK
    Arch Dis Child 93:248-50. 2008
    ..These criticisms could be largely addressed by taking into account the interests of others, particularly the interests of close family members...
  59. ncbi Position of the American Dietetic Association: ethical and legal issues in nutrition, hydration, and feeding
    Julie O Sullivan Maillet
    School of Health Related Professions, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, USA
    J Am Diet Assoc 102:716-26. 2002
    ....
  60. ncbi [Ethical decisions at the end of life: principles, uncertainties, perspectives]
    M Weber
    Universitätskliniken Mainz, III Medizinische Klinik, Germany
    Dtsch Med Wochenschr 127:2689-93. 2002
  61. pmc Voluntary euthanasia in Northern Ireland: general practitioners' beliefs, experiences, and actions
    K J McGlade
    Dept of Psychology, Queen s University Belfast
    Br J Gen Pract 50:794-7. 2000
    ..Any surveys to date have addressed a variety of specialties; however, no recent surveys have looked at general practitioner (GP) attitudes and experiences...
  62. ncbi [Physician assistance in dying or help to die--a line of legal demarcation (from the lawyer's perspective)]
    Klaus Ulsenheimer
    Z Evid Fortbild Qual Gesundhwes 102:176-83; discussion 184. 2008
    ..The so-called passive euthanasia which is characterised by withholding/withdrawing treatment measures is associated with the most difficult ..
  63. ncbi Euthanasia: an overview and the jewish perspective
    Benjamin Gesundheit
    Unit of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Cancer Immunotherapy and Immunobiology Research Center, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem
    Cancer Invest 24:621-9. 2006
    ..Over the course of history, abuse of the term has led to medical atrocities. Familiarity with the relevant bioethical issues and the development of practical guidelines might improve clinical performance...
  64. pmc The cultural context of patient's autonomy and doctor's duty: passive euthanasia and advance directives in Germany and Israel
    Silke Schicktanz
    Department of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine, University Medical Center Gottingen, Gottingen, Germany
    Med Health Care Philos 13:363-9. 2010
    ..ambivalence of the cultural reasons for this difference and its expression in various dissenting views on passive euthanasia and advance directives, and conclude with a comment on the difficulty in classifying either stance as more ..
  65. ncbi First-year college students' attitudes about end-of-life decision-making
    Gregory L Weiss
    Dept of Sociology, Roanoke College, Salem, Virginia 24153, USA
    Omega (Westport) 60:143-63. 2009
    ..Students clearly make distinctions in the propriety of active euthanasia, passive euthanasia, and physician-assisted death...
  66. ncbi [Legislative initiatives concerning euthanasia]
    Hans Ludwig Schreiber
    Institut für Kriminalwissenschaften, Abt für Arzt und Arzneimittelrecht des Juristischen Seminars, Universitat Gottingen
    Z Evid Fortbild Qual Gesundhwes 102:208-14. 2008
    ..The drafts suggest that the so-called passive euthanasia and the indirect euthanasia be regulated through provisions for the termination and/or limitation of life-..
  67. ncbi Euthanasia and related practices worldwide
    M J Kelleher
    National Suicide Research Foundation, Cork, Ireland
    Crisis 19:109-15. 1998
    ..In 12 of the 49 countries active euthanasia is said to occur while a general acceptance of passive euthanasia was reported to be widespread...
  68. ncbi Euthanasia: a need for reform
    Janis Moody
    Napier University, School of Acute and Continuing Care Nursing, Edinburgh
    Nurs Stand 17:40-4. 2003
    ..cases have served to heighten the confusion surrounding euthanasia, particularly in relation to active and passive euthanasia. It is apparent that the underlying philosophical basis of the active-passive distinction has led to ..
  69. ncbi Medical killing--an Evangelical perspective
    Thomas Schirrmacher
    Martin Bucer Theological Seminary, Friedrichstr 38, D 53111, Bonn, Germany
    Christ Bioeth 9:227-44. 2003
    ..Indirect euthanasia is seen as simply belonging to the risks inherent in any medical intervention. Passive euthanasia is accepted if used in order to save the dignity of the dying and is seen as merely ceasing to interfere ..
  70. ncbi Nancy B and Nancy F
    L Burkholder
    Department of Philosophy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver V6T 1Z1, Canada
    J Appl Philos 18:193-6. 2001
    ..At the top of the slope is an example of passive euthanasia; at the bottom, an example of active euthanasia...
  71. ncbi Attitudes toward euthanasia in Hong Kong--a comparison between physicians and the general public
    Alice Ming Lin Chong
    Department of Applied Social Studies, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong
    Death Stud 29:29-54. 2005
    ..general public was found to agree with active euthanasia and non-voluntary euthanasia and was neutral about passive euthanasia. On the other hand, physicians agreed with passive euthanasia, were neutral about non-voluntary euthanasia, ..
  72. ncbi [Overtreatment in advanced tumors of the head and neck]
    F Marzetti
    Divisione di Otorinolaringoiatria e Chirurgia Cervico Facciale, Istituto Regina Elena di Roma
    Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital 13:193-244. 1993
    ..important points of the problem: the definition of overtreatment, the limits of treatment, nontreatment, passive euthanasia, informed consent and quality of life...
  73. ncbi [The different ways of dying. Ethical reflections]
    A Azulay Tapiero
    Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Dr Moliner, Serra, Valencia
    An Med Interna 21:355-8. 2004
    ..Sometimes the death is produced as consequence of an action or omission, which raises ethical important dilemmas difficult to resolve. The similarities and differences between active euthanasia and passive euthanasia are analysed.
  74. ncbi Euthanasia: a summary of the law in England and Wales
    Constantinos Simillis
    School of Law, MA Health Care Ethics and Law by Distance Learning, University of Manchester, Department of General Surgery, Peterborough Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
    Med Sci Law 48:191-8. 2008
    ..This paper explores the law in England and Wales regarding the different categories of euthanasia: voluntary euthanasia, nonvoluntary euthanasia, passive euthanasia, and active euthanasia.
  75. ncbi Choosing between therapies: a painful dilemma
    J David Bleich
    Tradition 38:96-102. 2004
  76. ncbi Sedation without hydration can seriously damage your health
    Gillian Craig
    Int J Palliat Nurs 11:333-4; discussion 334-7. 2005
  77. ncbi Hyperammonemia: are the burdens too grave? Case study
    Mendel Tuchman
    Center for Clinical Research and Experimental Therapeutics, Children s Research Institute, Children s National Medical Center, 111 Michigan Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20010 2970, USA
    Ethics Intellect Disabil 8:1, 3. 2004
  78. pmc Framing euthanasia
    J P Bishop
    Peninsula Medical School, Knowledge Spa, Royal Cornwall Hospital, Truro TR1 3HD
    J Med Ethics 32:225-8. 2006
  79. ncbi Canadian nurses' and respiratory therapists' perspectives on withdrawal of life support in the intensive care unit
    Graeme M Rocker
    Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center, Halifax, Nova Scotia
    J Crit Care 20:59-65. 2005
    ..To describe perspectives of nurses (RNs) and respiratory therapists (RTs) related to end-of-life care for critically ill patients...
  80. ncbi Life support and euthanasia, a perspective on Shaw's new perspective
    Jacob Busch
    Department of Philosophy, University of Aarhus, Denmark
    J Med Ethics 37:81-3; discussion 123-5. 2011
    ..such as giving a patient a lethal overdose with the intention of ending that patient's life, and voluntary passive euthanasia, such as removing a patient from a ventilator, is much less obvious than is commonly acknowledged in the ..
  81. ncbi [Assisted dying in Germany: possibilities and where to draw the line--the legal view]
    K Kutzer
    Vorsitzender Richter am Bundesgerichtshof a D, Karlsbad
    MMW Fortschr Med 148:39-41. 2006
    ..If the process of dying has already begun, such a decision may be taken even when the expressed will of the patient is not known...
  82. ncbi A pilot audit of the process of end-of-life decision-making in the intensive care unit
    Martina Zib
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW, Australia
    Crit Care Resusc 9:213-8. 2007
    ..Until recently, quality improvement activities have been hampered by the absence of a clear sense of "best practice" in this complex area...
  83. ncbi Determining the value of life: discrimination, advance directives, and the right to die with dignity
    Paul T Menzel
    Pacific Lutheran University, USA
    Free Inq 25:39-41. 2005
  84. pmc Are physicians' recommendations to limit life support beneficial or burdensome? Bringing empirical data to the debate
    Douglas B White
    Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
    Am J Respir Crit Care Med 180:320-5. 2009
    ..Although there is a growing belief that physicians should routinely provide a recommendation to surrogates during deliberations about withdrawing life support, there is a paucity of empirical data on surrogates' perspectives on this topic...
  85. ncbi Necessary decisions
    Allen Verhey
    Duke Divinity School, USA
    Christ Century 122:9-10. 2005
  86. ncbi [Considerations apropos of a survey on the ending of life]
    D Lossignol
    Service de Medecine Interne, Clinique du traiternent de la douleur, Institut J Bordet
    Rev Med Brux 28:201-2. 2007
  87. ncbi Nutrition and hydration: should they be considered medical therapy?
    Kevin T McMahon
    Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary, Overbrook, USA
    Linacre Q 72:229-39. 2005
  88. doi [New version of recommendation no. 024-019 "premature birth at the boundary of infant viability"]
    C Roll
    Abt für Neonatologie und Pädiatrische Intensivmedizin, Vestische Kinder und Jugendklinik Datteln, Universitat Witten Herdecke
    Z Geburtshilfe Neonatol 212:114-5. 2008
  89. ncbi Withdrawal of ventilation in anticipation of death and caring for the dying in intensive care
    D Phelan
    Ir Med J 98:197-8. 2005
  90. ncbi Best interests, dementia, and end of life decision-making: the case of Mrs S
    Rosalind McDougall
    Oxford University, UK
    Monash Bioeth Rev 24:36-46. 2005
    ....
  91. ncbi Deciding for others at the end of life: storytelling and moral agency
    Mark Yarborough
    Center for Bioethics and Humanities, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, University of Colorado, Denver, USA
    J Clin Ethics 16:127-43. 2005
  92. ncbi Finding agreement to limit life-sustaining treatment for children who are in state custody
    T Savage
    University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, Rehabilitation Institute, Chicago, IL, USA
    Pediatr Nurs 27:594-7. 2001
    ..This article discusses the procedural as well as ethical issues involved in the process of finding agreement to limit life-sustaining treatment for children who are in state custody...
  93. ncbi Until life support do us part: a spouse's limited ability to terminate life support for an incompetent spouse with no hope of recovery
    Marybeth Herald
    Thomas Jefferson School of Law, USA
    Thomas Jefferson Law Rev 24:207-16. 2002
  94. ncbi Withholding and withdrawal of life support in intensive-care units in France: a prospective survey. French LATAREA Group
    E Ferrand
    Surgical Unit, Henri Mondor University Hospital, Creteil, France
    Lancet 357:9-14. 2001
    ..In France, there are no guidelines available on withholding and withdrawal of life-sustaining treatments, and information on the frequency of such decisions is scarce...
  95. pmc Artificial nutrition and hydration in the patient with advanced dementia: is withholding treatment compatible with traditional Judaism?
    M R Gillick
    Hebrew Rehabilitation Center for Aged, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    J Med Ethics 27:12-5. 2001
    ....
  96. ncbi Parental role in medical decision-making: fact or fiction? A comparative study of ethical dilemmas in French and American neonatal intensive care units
    Kristina Orfali
    MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics, The University of Chicago, 5841 S Maryland Avenue, MC 6098, Chicago, IL 6098, USA
    Soc Sci Med 58:2009-22. 2004
    ..The study provides an analysis of the making of "ethics", with an emphasis on how decisions are conceptualized as ethical dilemmas. The final conclusion is that the ongoing medical authority on ethics remains the key issue...
  97. pmc Deciding for imperilled newborns: medical authority or parental autonomy?
    H E McHaffie
    University of Edinburgh, Simpson Memorial Maternity Pavilion, Edinburgh
    J Med Ethics 27:104-9. 2001
    ..The results of these empirical studies provide both aids to ethical reflection and guidance for clinicians dealing with these vulnerable families. They demonstrate the value of empirical data in the philosophical debate...
  98. ncbi [Withholding and withdrawing treatment in the perinatal period: importance of a coherent attitude between gyneco-obstetricians and pediatricians]
    M Dehan
    , , Paris
    J Gynecol Obstet Biol Reprod (Paris) 30:133-8. 2001
    ..These guidelines present: definitions, clinical situations, ethical principles, obligations of the medical and nursing staff, and specific conditions where dilemmas occur. These guidelines focus on the obstetrico-pediatrics relationship...
  99. ncbi Is there a moral duty to die?
    J A Corlett
    Department of Philosophy, San Diego State University, 5500 Companile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182 8142, USA
    Health Care Anal 9:41-63. 2001
    ..More precisely, I concur with his claim that there is a moral duty to die inexpensively in health care contexts. Then I provide and defend a philosophical analysis of the conditions in which such a duty could exist...
  100. ncbi [Ethical decision making in neonatology: questioning until answers appear]
    Claudia Schulz
    Klinik für Neonatologie am Universitätspital Zürich
    Pflege Z 57:44-8. 2004
  101. ncbi When is deactivation of artificial pacing and AICD illegal, immoral, and unethical?
    Maria J Silveira
    Am J Geriatr Cardiol 12:275-6. 2003

Research Grants7

  1. THE ROLE OF LYMPHOCYTES IN CEREBRAL ISCHEMIC INJURY
    Kyra Becker; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ....
  2. Clinical Versus Experiential Views of Genetic Disability
    CAROL GILL; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ....
  3. MECHANISMS OF ENZYMIC AND HYDRIDE TRANSFERS
    Gregory Petsko; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  4. Decisionmaking in Pediatric Palliative Care
    JOHN FEUDTNER; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  5. Hospice Intervention for Older Adults With End Stage Renal Disease
    Lewis Cohen; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  6. Partnering to Empower Near East Side Family Caregivers
    MARY MEEKER; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..The long term objective of these efforts is to provide culturally appropriate supportive interventions for African American caregivers throughout our community. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  7. CNS antigen sensitization in stroke.
    Kyra Becker; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..Data derived from this study will be used to plan future trials of immunomodulation in patients with stroke. ..