Small Laboratory Animal Imaging: High Resolution Microcomputed Tomography System

Summary

Principal Investigator: RAMIRO TORIBIO
Abstract: [unreadable] DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): A High Resolution Microcomputed Tomography System, MicroCAT II, manufactured CTI Molecular Imaging, Inc. (Knoxville, TN) is being requested in this Shared Instrumentation Grant. The MicroCAT Imaging System was developed by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratories with the objective of accelerating the screening of genetically- engineered mice. The system consists of a microfocus X-ray source with a <10[unreadable]m focal spot size and larger focal spots for high-speed studies. For X-ray detection, the MicroCAT II has a high resolution 16 megapixel CCD camera with a large field of view (FOV) for screening and small FOV for high resolution imaging. The system is lead-shielded and FDA X-ray compliant. Specifications in the requested MicroCAT II system will allow NIH-funded researchers to image small laboratory animals and tissue specimens, fitting the investigators imaging needs. The MicroCAT II system bundled with the Amira Software will allow the non-invasive capture of data, generation of morphological information, longitudinal studies using landmark-based image registration applications, and high resolution 3D reconstructions necessary for disease modeling. [unreadable] [unreadable] There are no Micro-CT imaging systems at the Ohio State University. We have alternate methods to image laboratory animals and tissue specimens, however, these modalities are less sensitive for structural analysis, are time consuming, expensive to be used on a routine basis, have different applications, and do not allow longitudinal studies. A microCT system will maximize the generation of high quality information and will make the use of available resources more efficient and productive. This system will also complement the existing small animal imaging technologies. The MicroCAT II system will allow the NIH-funded investigators participating in this initiative to complete and improve their studies on bone biology, cell cycle dysregulation and development, transcriptional regulation of osteoblast and osteoclast function, prostate/breast cancer and bone metastasis, androgens and bone mass, growth factors and bone development, endocrine neoplasia and skull development, bone tissue engineering, gene delivery, and others. The MicroCAT II system will be important for in vivo longitudinal studies, avoiding the early sacrifice of valuable research animals. It will also be useful to other researchers because it can be used to image biomaterials and soft tissue interphases. This system will increase the speed and ability to detect differences not possible before, thus increasing statistical power, making possible the evaluation of a larger number of animals, and allowing in vivo repeated measurements. The instrument will be located in a readily accessible biosecured animal room (Sisson Hall) of the College of Veterinary Medicine under the supervision of a Research Scientist Supervisor (specialized in imaging) and a Laboratory Animal Veterinarian. An Organizational and Administrative Plan for the placement, maintenance, and operation of the MicroCAT II Imaging System has been formulated. An hourly fee will provide funds for a service contract and continuing education for the supervisor. Billing will be performed by the Imaging Service of the Department of Veterinary Biosciences. The principal investigator has received trained on the use of the MicroCAT II system at Oak Ridge National Labs and at ImTek, Inc. (Knoxville, TN). Users will receive training by the system manufacturer, principal investigator, supervisor, and laboratory animal veterinarian. The MicroCAT II control computer will run in a Windows XP environment connected to a high-speed real-time reconstruction engine, and linked to the local networks and the Ohio Supercomputer Center (Columbus, OH), allowing rapid data processing and access from distant sites. Salary and benefits for the Supervisor and Space and utilities for the instrument will be provided by Department of Veterinary Biosciences and the College of Veterinary Medicine. [unreadable] [unreadable]
Funding Period: 2006-04-01 - 2008-03-31
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc The midregion, nuclear localization sequence, and C terminus of PTHrP regulate skeletal development, hematopoiesis, and survival in mice
    Ramiro E Toribio
    Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon Tharp St, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
    FASEB J 24:1947-57. 2010
  2. pmc Zoledronic acid reduces bone loss and tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft model of osteolytic oral squamous cell carcinoma
    Chelsea K Martin
    Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43214, USA
    Cancer Res 70:8607-16. 2010

Scientific Experts

  • RAMIRO TORIBIO
  • Chelsea K Martin
  • Lisa G Lanigan
  • Nanda K Thudi
  • Tobie D Wolfe
  • Jillian L Werbeck
  • Thomas J Rosol

Detail Information

Publications2

  1. pmc The midregion, nuclear localization sequence, and C terminus of PTHrP regulate skeletal development, hematopoiesis, and survival in mice
    Ramiro E Toribio
    Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon Tharp St, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
    FASEB J 24:1947-57. 2010
    ..The down-regulation of Runx1, Runx2, and Sox9 indicates that PTHrP is a modulator of transcriptional activation during stem cell commitment...
  2. pmc Zoledronic acid reduces bone loss and tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft model of osteolytic oral squamous cell carcinoma
    Chelsea K Martin
    Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43214, USA
    Cancer Res 70:8607-16. 2010
    ..In summary, our results establish that ZOL can reduce OSCC-induced osteolysis and may be valuable as an adjuvant therapy in OSCC to preserve mandibular and maxillary bone volume and function...