Small Animal Bioluminescence and Fluorescence Imaging System (with 3D capability)

Summary

Principal Investigator: R P Mason
Abstract: [unreadable] DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): We propose to purchase a commercial bioluminescent imaging (BLI) system, specifically, the Caliper (Xenogen) IVIS SpectrumTM. It will primarily serve six NIH-funded research teams to undertake biomedical research. In addition, through a Small Animal Imaging Research Program (U24- SAIRP) it will support 12 other current research investigations and serve as a catalyst for new research. It is widely recognized that imaging enhances biomedical research, particularly in oncology. Tumors exhibit substantial heterogeneity, and thus, it is advantageous for each tumor to serve as its own control. Longitudinal studies in individual tumors enjoy three primary benefits: i) the need for fewer animals, ii) as a corollary, the need for less reagent (therefore, rare and costly drugs and antibodies can be screened more efficiently), iii) more robust statistics. Bioluminescent imaging is particularly effective for high throughput screening of tumors at small volumes (including sub palpable) growing in nude mice. Whole mice may be observed and the development of remote metastasis is readily assessed without a priori assumptions about location (in contrast to the requirements for effective pathology). BLI does require introduction of a reporter gene (typically, firefly luciferase), but this is reliably accomplished and is routine at UT Southwestern Medical Center. BLI has the additional advantage that specific promoters (e.g., hypoxia, clusterin, estrogen, or other stress elements) may be included to regulate luciferase expression. This can also be achieved using fluorescent reporters and the Spectrum can also undertake fluorescent imaging, with spectral unmixing to reliably remove autofluorescence or differentiate reporters with distinct wavelengths. The Spectrum offers 3-dimensional capabilities for both bioluminescent and fluorescence imaging, which greatly enhances the ability to distinguish the location of developing tumors. Hitherto, we provided a BLI service using home built instrumentation, but we believe it is important to add a capability using a standard commercial platform. Commercial systems are more user friendly allowing diverse investigators to be rapidly trained to conduct imaging studies. Furthermore, UT Southwestern is establishing a specific pathogen free (SPF) facility including a small animal tumor model core resource, which requires imaging capabilities. While BLI instruments are relatively cheap, they are beyond the scope of individual investigators, and this shared instrument will facilitate new experiments while being efficiently used. BLI has become established as the premiere screening tool for small tumor volumes and metastatic spread. The new instrument will accelerate development of new therapies in our institution, which will be directly translatable to the clinic, and thus, provide more effective future therapy for patients. While the reporter gene is only relevant in the preclinical setting, the results achieved should provide insight into optimizing therapy protocols for patients. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]
Funding Period: 2007-09-20 - 2008-09-19
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Tubulin-destabilizing agent BPR0L075 induces vascular-disruption in human breast cancer mammary fat pad xenografts
    Li Liu
    Cancer Imaging Program, Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e43314. 2012
  2. pmc Comparison of optical and power Doppler ultrasound imaging for non-invasive evaluation of arsenic trioxide as a vascular disrupting agent in tumors
    Mustafa K Alhasan
    Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e46106. 2012
  3. pmc Adipocyte-derived endotrophin promotes malignant tumor progression
    Jiyoung Park
    Touchstone Diabetes Center, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 8549, USA
    J Clin Invest 122:4243-56. 2012
  4. pmc Imaging beta-galactosidase activity in human tumor xenografts and transgenic mice using a chemiluminescent substrate
    Li Liu
    Department of Radiology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e12024. 2010
  5. pmc On the potential for molecular imaging with Cerenkov luminescence
    Matthew A Lewis
    Advanced Radiological Sciences, Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 9058, USA
    Opt Lett 35:3889-91. 2010
  6. pmc A perspective on vascular disrupting agents that interact with tubulin: preclinical tumor imaging and biological assessment
    Ralph P Mason
    Department of Radiology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 9058, USA
    Integr Biol (Camb) 3:375-87. 2011
  7. pmc Cell encapsulation and oxygenation in nanoporous microcontainers
    Barjor Gimi
    UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
    Biomed Microdevices 11:1205-12. 2009
  8. pmc Dynamic near-infrared optical imaging of 2-deoxyglucose uptake by intracranial glioma of athymic mice
    Heling Zhou
    Department of Radiology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e8051. 2009

Scientific Experts

  • R P Mason
  • Matthew A Lewis
  • Barjor Gimi
  • Li Liu
  • Mustafa K Alhasan
  • Jiyoung Park
  • Heling Zhou
  • Haley Beck
  • Xiaolei Wang
  • Jennifer Magnusson
  • Philipp E Scherer
  • Xinli Liu
  • Hsing Pang Hsieh
  • Amyn A Habib
  • Kate Luby-Phelps
  • Dawen Zhao
  • Bruce E Mickey

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. pmc Tubulin-destabilizing agent BPR0L075 induces vascular-disruption in human breast cancer mammary fat pad xenografts
    Li Liu
    Cancer Imaging Program, Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e43314. 2012
    ....
  2. pmc Comparison of optical and power Doppler ultrasound imaging for non-invasive evaluation of arsenic trioxide as a vascular disrupting agent in tumors
    Mustafa K Alhasan
    Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 7:e46106. 2012
    ....
  3. pmc Adipocyte-derived endotrophin promotes malignant tumor progression
    Jiyoung Park
    Touchstone Diabetes Center, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 8549, USA
    J Clin Invest 122:4243-56. 2012
    ..Our results highlight the crucial role of ETP as an obesity-associated factor that promotes tumor growth in the context of adipocyte interactions with tumor and stromal cells...
  4. pmc Imaging beta-galactosidase activity in human tumor xenografts and transgenic mice using a chemiluminescent substrate
    Li Liu
    Department of Radiology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 5:e12024. 2010
    ..We now present a novel approach for in vivo detection of beta-galactosidase using optical imaging to detect light emission following administration of the chemiluminescent 1,2-dioxetane substrate Galacto-Light PlusTM...
  5. pmc On the potential for molecular imaging with Cerenkov luminescence
    Matthew A Lewis
    Advanced Radiological Sciences, Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 9058, USA
    Opt Lett 35:3889-91. 2010
    ....
  6. pmc A perspective on vascular disrupting agents that interact with tubulin: preclinical tumor imaging and biological assessment
    Ralph P Mason
    Department of Radiology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 9058, USA
    Integr Biol (Camb) 3:375-87. 2011
    ..This review focuses on an integration of the appropriate biochemical and biological tools necessary to assess (preclinically) new small-molecule, tubulin active VDAs for their potential to be clinically effective anticancer agents...
  7. pmc Cell encapsulation and oxygenation in nanoporous microcontainers
    Barjor Gimi
    UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
    Biomed Microdevices 11:1205-12. 2009
    ..The methods described above should aid in evaluating the long term survival and efficacy of cellular grafts...
  8. pmc Dynamic near-infrared optical imaging of 2-deoxyglucose uptake by intracranial glioma of athymic mice
    Heling Zhou
    Department of Radiology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e8051. 2009
    ..We have applied in vivo optical imaging to study dynamic uptake of a near-infrared dye-labeled glucose analogue, 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) by orthotopic glioma in a mouse model...