Antimicrobial Polymers for Medical Application

Summary

Principal Investigator: HANS GLASER
Abstract: A new class of antimicrobials based on dendrimer technology has been identified and shown to possess potent biocidal activity. Laboratory evaluation of these polycationic dendrimers has shown that they are more than 100 times more effective than a comparable amount of free quaternary ammonium compound at killing Esherichia coli. Potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus has also been demonstrated. These antimicrobial dendrimers have also been successfully immobilized on to linear polyurethanes. These non-leaching biocidal polymers demonstrated antibacterial activity, even though the degree of substitution was limited to approximately 3 weight percent. We propose to explore other methods to increase and optimize the level of incorporation of the dendrimer onto the polymer backbone. Following synthesis, materials will be tested for antimicrobial activity. It is expected that defining new techniques to covalently graft these compounds onto polymers will enhance the performance of these materials, and provide the basis for antimicrobial polymers and textiles for a wide range of applications, including medical devices (catheters, wound dressings, surgical drapes), antimicrobial air filters, and dental unit waterlines. PROPOSED COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS: Successful completion of this proposed work will lead to the development of a new generation of non-leaching antibacterial polymers for use in medical devices and surgical equipment. These materials could potentially be used in a variety of medical applications, including wound dressings, catheters, surgical drapes and air filters, to reduce the incidence of nosocomial and device-related infection.
Funding Period: 2002-01-21 - 2003-07-20
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Distinct roles of dendritic cells and B cells in Va14Ja18 natural T cell activation in vivo
    Jelena S Bezbradica
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
    J Immunol 174:4696-705. 2005
  2. ncbi Interactive sites in the MyD88 Toll/interleukin (IL) 1 receptor domain responsible for coupling to the IL1beta signaling pathway
    Chunsheng Li
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 2363, USA
    J Biol Chem 280:26152-9. 2005
  3. ncbi Intracellular protein therapy with SOCS3 inhibits inflammation and apoptosis
    Daewoong Jo
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1161 21st Avenue South, A 5321 MCN, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA
    Nat Med 11:892-8. 2005
  4. ncbi Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor regulates effector differentiation of invariant natural killer T cells during thymic ontogeny
    Jelena S Bezbradica
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA
    Immunity 25:487-97. 2006
  5. ncbi Fractalkine and CX3CR1 mediate leukocyte capture by endothelium in response to Shiga toxin
    Cristina Zanchi
    Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research, Bergamo, Italy
    J Immunol 181:1460-9. 2008

Detail Information

Publications5

  1. ncbi Distinct roles of dendritic cells and B cells in Va14Ja18 natural T cell activation in vivo
    Jelena S Bezbradica
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
    J Immunol 174:4696-705. 2005
    ..Thus, the differential immune outcome based on the type of APC that displays glycolipid Ags in vivo has implications for the design of therapies that harness the immunoregulatory functions of iNKT cells...
  2. ncbi Interactive sites in the MyD88 Toll/interleukin (IL) 1 receptor domain responsible for coupling to the IL1beta signaling pathway
    Chunsheng Li
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 2363, USA
    J Biol Chem 280:26152-9. 2005
    ..Mutations in Box 2 and 3 prevented homotypic MyD88 oligomerization via TIR domain. Based on this structure-function analysis, a three-dimensional docking model of TIR-TIR interaction between MyD88 and IL1RAcP was developed...
  3. ncbi Intracellular protein therapy with SOCS3 inhibits inflammation and apoptosis
    Daewoong Jo
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1161 21st Avenue South, A 5321 MCN, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA
    Nat Med 11:892-8. 2005
    ..It also reduced ConA-induced liver apoptosis. Thus, replenishing the intracellular stores of SOCS3 with CP-SOCS3 effectively suppresses the devastating effects of acute inflammation...
  4. ncbi Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor regulates effector differentiation of invariant natural killer T cells during thymic ontogeny
    Jelena S Bezbradica
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA
    Immunity 25:487-97. 2006
    ..Thus, we ascribe a unique function to Csf-2, which regulates iNKT cell effector differentiation during development by a mechanism that renders them competent for cytokine secretion...
  5. ncbi Fractalkine and CX3CR1 mediate leukocyte capture by endothelium in response to Shiga toxin
    Cristina Zanchi
    Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research, Bergamo, Italy
    J Immunol 181:1460-9. 2008
    ..coli O157:H7 infection...