Direction Sensitive Sensor

Summary

Principal Investigator: CHRISTOS EURIPIDES CONSTANTINOU
Abstract: The focus of the present application is to develop a new in vivo sensor and associated instrumentation to enable the intraluminal monitoring of tissue characteristics. The design specifications incorporate a directionally sensitive sensor probe capable of evaluating tissue compliance, displacement contact pressure and force of contraction. This instrument will be used to assess the static and dynamic biomechanical characteristic of the vagina and its response to active voluntary pelvic floor contractions and passive compression produced by Valsalva. Movement of the vagina can be displayed instantly on the monitor to provide feedback to the patient. This sensor system can be useful in resolving the cause of female urinary incontinence, which affects up to 35% of adult population by enhancing the value of the physical examination and supplementing urodynamic tests. While useful in the evaluation of bladder/urethral function, urodynamics does not provide relevant information on the influence of the pelvic floor, in maintaining continence. Indeed appropriate evaluation of pelvic floor function is critical in determining whether conservative management, such as strengthening with Kegel exercises, can be useful for treatment. We propose to introduce forthwith a novel in vivo sensor that will enable the quantitative testing of pelvic floor function in a manner corresponding to urodynamics. The design specifications of this instrument are based upon knowledge acquired from imaging, physical examination and urodynamics. We anticipate that this probe will be fabricated so that it can be handled readily by medical personnel with the minimum of training. We expect that this probe will by used by urologists, gynecologists and physical therapists in association with urodynamic testing or independently. We intend to build a prototype probe, write associated software for data collection, evaluation and calibration of transducers and identify frequency response parameters followed by a few pilot studies to obtain data from human subjects with varying etiology of urinary continence.
Funding Period: 2004-09-30 - 2006-09-29
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Visualization of biomechanical properties of female pelvic floor function using video motion tracking of ultrasound imaging
    Shirin Rahmanian
    VA and Stanford University Medical School Urology, Stanford, CA, USA
    Stud Health Technol Inform 132:390-5. 2008
  2. pmc Mechanisms of pelvic floor muscle function and the effect on the urethra during a cough
    Ruth C Lovegrove Jones
    Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Centre and Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94304 1290, USA
    Eur Urol 57:1101-10. 2010
  3. ncbi 2D Ultrasound image processing in identifying responses of urogenital structures to pelvic floor muscle activity
    Qiyu Peng
    Department of Urology, School of Medicine Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94306, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 34:477-93. 2006
  4. pmc Ultrasound evaluation of dynamic responses of female pelvic floor muscles
    Qiyu Peng
    PAVA Medical Center and Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 943050, USA
    Ultrasound Med Biol 33:342-52. 2007
  5. ncbi Evaluation of the dynamic responses of female pelvic floor using a novel vaginal probe
    Chris E Constantinou
    Department of Urology, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1101:297-315. 2007
  6. ncbi Spatial distribution of vaginal closure pressures of continent and stress urinary incontinent women
    Qiyu Peng
    PAVA Medical Center and Stanford University School of Medicine Urology, CA 94305, USA
    Physiol Meas 28:1429-50. 2007
  7. ncbi High resolution regional elasticity mapping of the human prostate
    Yoshinobu Murayama
    College of Engineering, Nihon University, Koriyama, Fukushima, 9638642 Japan
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2007:5803-6. 2007
  8. ncbi Influence of pelvic floor muscle contraction on the profile of vaginal closure pressure in continent and stress urinary incontinent women
    Keiichi Shishido
    Department of Urology, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima, Japan
    J Urol 179:1917-22. 2008
  9. pmc Dynamics of female pelvic floor function using urodynamics, ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
    Christos E Constantinou
    Department of Urology, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 144:S159-65. 2009

Scientific Experts

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. ncbi Visualization of biomechanical properties of female pelvic floor function using video motion tracking of ultrasound imaging
    Shirin Rahmanian
    VA and Stanford University Medical School Urology, Stanford, CA, USA
    Stud Health Technol Inform 132:390-5. 2008
    ..We conclude that new and clinically significant amount of original information about the female pelvic floor can be obtained through the proposed analysis of visualizations...
  2. pmc Mechanisms of pelvic floor muscle function and the effect on the urethra during a cough
    Ruth C Lovegrove Jones
    Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Centre and Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94304 1290, USA
    Eur Urol 57:1101-10. 2010
    ..Current measurement tools have difficulty identifying the automatic physiologic processes maintaining continence, and many questions still remain about pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function during automatic events...
  3. ncbi 2D Ultrasound image processing in identifying responses of urogenital structures to pelvic floor muscle activity
    Qiyu Peng
    Department of Urology, School of Medicine Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94306, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 34:477-93. 2006
    ..It is concluded that a considerable amount of new, potentially useful clinical information can be revealed from video recordings of perineal ultrasound using the image analysis approach proposed...
  4. pmc Ultrasound evaluation of dynamic responses of female pelvic floor muscles
    Qiyu Peng
    PAVA Medical Center and Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 943050, USA
    Ultrasound Med Biol 33:342-52. 2007
    ..The statistical analyses showed that the PFM responses of the healthy subjects and the SUI patients are significantly different in both the supine and standing experiments...
  5. ncbi Evaluation of the dynamic responses of female pelvic floor using a novel vaginal probe
    Chris E Constantinou
    Department of Urology, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 1101:297-315. 2007
    ..The design of this probe enables the measurement of force and displacement during rapidly occurring events...
  6. ncbi Spatial distribution of vaginal closure pressures of continent and stress urinary incontinent women
    Qiyu Peng
    PAVA Medical Center and Stanford University School of Medicine Urology, CA 94305, USA
    Physiol Meas 28:1429-50. 2007
    ..The results show that the VPP measured by the prototype probe can be used to quantitatively evaluate the strength of the PFM, which is a clinical index for the diagnosis or assessment of female SUI...
  7. ncbi High resolution regional elasticity mapping of the human prostate
    Yoshinobu Murayama
    College of Engineering, Nihon University, Koriyama, Fukushima, 9638642 Japan
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2007:5803-6. 2007
    ..Using this methodology we mapped the elasticity of human prostate cancer (CaP) and it was obviously observed that the node was significantly harder than surrounding normal tissues and had some textures...
  8. ncbi Influence of pelvic floor muscle contraction on the profile of vaginal closure pressure in continent and stress urinary incontinent women
    Keiichi Shishido
    Department of Urology, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima, Japan
    J Urol 179:1917-22. 2008
    ..Vaginal pressure profile data were used to test the hypothesis that the strength of pelvic floor muscle contractions differs significantly between continent women and women with stress urinary incontinence...
  9. pmc Dynamics of female pelvic floor function using urodynamics, ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
    Christos E Constantinou
    Department of Urology, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 144:S159-65. 2009
    ..Furthermore, observations suggest that timing of responses is a significant factor separating the continent from the incontinent subjects...