Maltreated Children's Emotions and Self-Cognitions

Summary

Principal Investigator: MICHAEL contact LEWIS
Abstract: DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Physically abused and neglected children are at risk for a variety of social and behavioral problems but the process by which maltreatment leads to individual differences in behavioral adjustment is not well understood. This continuation grant further examines a) children's self-conscious evaluative emotions and attributions as a function of the type and severity of maltreatment and b) age and sex differences in these psychological processes as they enter adolescence (ages 9-13). Our overall goal is to test a conceptual model of maltreatment, where entry into adolescence interacts with early maltreatment history to exacerbate children's emotional and behavioral problems. Preliminary evidence suggests that children's self-conscious evaluative emotions account for individual differences in children's adjustment. A sample of 139 children, including 69 maltreated and 70 controls, have been identified and followed between the ages of 4 and 8 years. Because differences in self-conscious evaluative emotions and behavioral problems are being observed as a function of maltreatment, and because self-conscious emotions partially mediate the effect of maltreatment in behavior problems from 4 to 8 years, the continuation grant will follow all children through age 13 in order to fully test our model. Maltreatment, including measures of continued negative parental interactions and use of physical punishment will be assessed. Children's emotional behavior and attributions on experimenter-controlled tasks will be obtained. In addition, mothers and children will be observed in other situations as they interact around the child's completing difficult tasks. The quality of maternal behavior will be quantified and combined with other measures of maltreatment. The project is relevant to public health because it will provide information important in identifying and assessing those maltreated children at greatest risk and will assist in targeting intervention efforts toward changing children's poor emotion-attribution styles and those parenting patterns that promote maladaptive behavior.
Funding Period: ----------------1996 - ---------------2012-
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Relations of parental report and observation of parenting to maltreatment history
    David S Bennett
    Drexel University College of Medicine, USA
    Child Maltreat 11:63-75. 2006
  2. pmc Brain activation when hearing one's own and others' names
    Dennis P Carmody
    Institute for the Study of Child Development, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 97 Paterson Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 0019, USA
    Brain Res 1116:153-8. 2006
  3. ncbi Brief report: brain activation to social words in a sedated child with autism
    Dennis P Carmody
    Institute for the Study of Child Development, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 97 Paterson Street, New Brunswick, NJ, 08903 0019, USA
    J Autism Dev Disord 37:1381-5. 2007
  4. pmc Emotion knowledge in young neglected children
    Margaret W Sullivan
    Robert Wood Johnson Medical School UMDNJ, 97 Paterson Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
    Child Maltreat 13:301-6. 2008
  5. pmc Neglected children, shame-proneness, and depressive symptoms
    David S Bennett
    Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Child Maltreat 15:305-14. 2010
  6. pmc The relation between abuse and violent delinquency: the conversion of shame to blame in juvenile offenders
    Jason Gold
    Institute for the Study of Child Development, Department of Pediatrics, UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
    Child Abuse Negl 35:459-67. 2011
  7. pmc Individual differences in the cortisol responses of neglected and comparison children
    Margaret Wolan Sullivan
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute for the Study of Child Development, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School UMDNJ, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
    Child Maltreat 18:8-16. 2013
  8. pmc How neglect and punitiveness influence emotion knowledge
    Margaret Wolan Sullivan
    Institute for the Study of Child Development Department of Pediatrics, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School UMDNJ, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
    Child Psychiatry Hum Dev 41:285-98. 2010

Scientific Experts

  • Margaret Wolan Sullivan
  • Michael Lewis
  • David S Bennett
  • Dennis P Carmody
  • Jason Gold
  • George H Lambert
  • Rosanne Moreno
  • Audrey E Mars
  • Kapila Seshadri

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. pmc Relations of parental report and observation of parenting to maltreatment history
    David S Bennett
    Drexel University College of Medicine, USA
    Child Maltreat 11:63-75. 2006
    ..The findings suggest that parental report using the CTSPC may be useful in assessing parenting behaviors among mothers with a history of maltreatment, although socially desirable responding is a significant problem...
  2. pmc Brain activation when hearing one's own and others' names
    Dennis P Carmody
    Institute for the Study of Child Development, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 97 Paterson Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 0019, USA
    Brain Res 1116:153-8. 2006
    ..These findings provide evidence that hearing one's own name has unique brain functioning activation specific to one's own name in relation to the names of others...
  3. ncbi Brief report: brain activation to social words in a sedated child with autism
    Dennis P Carmody
    Institute for the Study of Child Development, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 97 Paterson Street, New Brunswick, NJ, 08903 0019, USA
    J Autism Dev Disord 37:1381-5. 2007
    ..These findings indicate that fMRI can identify and quantify the brain regions that are activated in response to words in children with autism under sedation...
  4. pmc Emotion knowledge in young neglected children
    Margaret W Sullivan
    Robert Wood Johnson Medical School UMDNJ, 97 Paterson Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
    Child Maltreat 13:301-6. 2008
    ..Because both neglected status and IQ may contribute to deficits in emotional knowledge, both should be assessed when evaluating these children to appropriately design and pace emotion knowledge interventions...
  5. pmc Neglected children, shame-proneness, and depressive symptoms
    David S Bennett
    Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Child Maltreat 15:305-14. 2010
    ..The potential role of shame as a process variable that can help explain how some neglected children exhibit depressive symptoms is discussed...
  6. pmc The relation between abuse and violent delinquency: the conversion of shame to blame in juvenile offenders
    Jason Gold
    Institute for the Study of Child Development, Department of Pediatrics, UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
    Child Abuse Negl 35:459-67. 2011
    ..The objective of this work is to apply a conceptual model linking abusive parenting to the conversion of shame into blaming others and therefore to violent delinquency...
  7. pmc Individual differences in the cortisol responses of neglected and comparison children
    Margaret Wolan Sullivan
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute for the Study of Child Development, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School UMDNJ, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
    Child Maltreat 18:8-16. 2013
    ....
  8. pmc How neglect and punitiveness influence emotion knowledge
    Margaret Wolan Sullivan
    Institute for the Study of Child Development Department of Pediatrics, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School UMDNJ, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
    Child Psychiatry Hum Dev 41:285-98. 2010
    ..IQ was unrelated to speed of emotion recognition. Punitiveness did not directly contribute to emotion knowledge deficits but appeared in exploratory analysis to be related to speed of emotion recognition...