Cognitive Neuroscience of Mathematical Development

Summary

Principal Investigator: Vinod Menon
Abstract: The maturation of mathematical reasoning skills is a hallmark of human cognitive and academic development. Cognitive, developmental, educational and clinical psychologists have provided valuable insights into the complex and dynamic developmental changes in mathematical skills during childhood. The ages between 7 and 10 (grades 2, 3 and 4) represent an important period for the development of mathematical skills. However, very little is currently known about the development of brain systems that mediate mathematical skill acquisition. The overarching goal of our proposal is to investigate the development of mathematical skills in children using a cognitive and systems neuroscience approach, and a longitudinal study design. The specific aims of this clinical research proposal are to (1) Investigate longitudinal changes in cognitive and brain processes mediating mathematical cognition at grade 4, (2) Investigate longitudinal changes in functional and structural connectivity of brain networks underlying mathematical cognition, and (3) Investigate the cognitive and neural basis of individual differences in mathematical skill development. Our proposed studies will provide important insights into (1) the neural basis of functional specialization for mathematical cognition;(2) the relation between neural changes and changes in working memory, strategy and increased task proficiency;(3) the developmental origins of functional specialization in the posterior parietal cortex;(4) cortical networks and interactions that subserve mathematical task performance at different stages of skill development;and (5) cognitive and neural factors that mediate individual differences in learning. Taken together, this work will provide significant new information on the maturation of brain networks important for mathematical cognition and skill acquisition. This work has the potential to have broad impact on developmental cognitive neuroscience, brain development, and clinical psychology.
Funding Period: ----------------2009 - ---------------2011-
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Amygdala subregional structure and intrinsic functional connectivity predicts individual differences in anxiety during early childhood
    Shaozheng Qin
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California Electronic address
    Biol Psychiatry 75:892-900. 2014
  2. pmc Fractionating the neural correlates of individual working memory components underlying arithmetic problem solving skills in children
    Arron W S Metcalfe
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA Electronic address
    Dev Cogn Neurosci 6:162-75. 2013
  3. pmc Visuo-spatial working memory is an important source of domain-general vulnerability in the development of arithmetic cognition
    Sarit Ashkenazi
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA School of Education, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 91905, Israel Electronic address
    Neuropsychologia 51:2305-17. 2013
  4. pmc Estimation of resting-state functional connectivity using random subspace based partial correlation: a novel method for reducing global artifacts
    Tianwen Chen
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 82:87-100. 2013
  5. pmc Neural predictors of individual differences in response to math tutoring in primary-grade school children
    Kaustubh Supekar
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94304, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:8230-5. 2013
  6. pmc A parcellation scheme based on von Mises-Fisher distributions and Markov random fields for segmenting brain regions using resting-state fMRI
    Srikanth Ryali
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 65:83-96. 2013
  7. pmc The neurodevelopmental basis of math anxiety
    Christina B Young
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Psychol Sci 23:492-501. 2012
  8. pmc Dynamic reconfiguration of structural and functional connectivity across core neurocognitive brain networks with development
    Lucina Q Uddin
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 31:18578-89. 2011
  9. pmc Estimation of functional connectivity in fMRI data using stability selection-based sparse partial correlation with elastic net penalty
    Srikanth Ryali
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 59:3852-61. 2012
  10. pmc How does a child solve 7 + 8? Decoding brain activity patterns associated with counting and retrieval strategies
    Soohyun Cho
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Dev Sci 14:989-1001. 2011

Scientific Experts

Detail Information

Publications16

  1. pmc Amygdala subregional structure and intrinsic functional connectivity predicts individual differences in anxiety during early childhood
    Shaozheng Qin
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California Electronic address
    Biol Psychiatry 75:892-900. 2014
    ..Even less is known about the neurodevelopmental origins of individual differences in childhood anxiety...
  2. pmc Fractionating the neural correlates of individual working memory components underlying arithmetic problem solving skills in children
    Arron W S Metcalfe
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA Electronic address
    Dev Cogn Neurosci 6:162-75. 2013
    ....
  3. pmc Visuo-spatial working memory is an important source of domain-general vulnerability in the development of arithmetic cognition
    Sarit Ashkenazi
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA School of Education, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 91905, Israel Electronic address
    Neuropsychologia 51:2305-17. 2013
    ..This work advances our understanding of VSWM as an important domain-general cognitive process in both typical and atypical mathematical skill development. ..
  4. pmc Estimation of resting-state functional connectivity using random subspace based partial correlation: a novel method for reducing global artifacts
    Tianwen Chen
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 82:87-100. 2013
    ..Our results suggest that RSMFC is an effective method for minimizing the effects of global artifacts and artificial negative correlations, while accurately recovering intrinsic functional brain networks. ..
  5. pmc Neural predictors of individual differences in response to math tutoring in primary-grade school children
    Kaustubh Supekar
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94304, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:8230-5. 2013
    ..More generally, our study suggests that quantitative measures of brain structure and intrinsic brain organization can provide a more sensitive marker of skill acquisition than behavioral measures...
  6. pmc A parcellation scheme based on von Mises-Fisher distributions and Markov random fields for segmenting brain regions using resting-state fMRI
    Srikanth Ryali
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 65:83-96. 2013
    ..Taken together, our findings suggest that our method is a powerful tool for investigating functional subdivisions in the human brain...
  7. pmc The neurodevelopmental basis of math anxiety
    Christina B Young
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Psychol Sci 23:492-501. 2012
    ..Our study identified the neural correlates of math anxiety for the first time, and our findings have significant implications for its early identification and treatment...
  8. pmc Dynamic reconfiguration of structural and functional connectivity across core neurocognitive brain networks with development
    Lucina Q Uddin
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA
    J Neurosci 31:18578-89. 2011
    ....
  9. pmc Estimation of functional connectivity in fMRI data using stability selection-based sparse partial correlation with elastic net penalty
    Srikanth Ryali
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Neuroimage 59:3852-61. 2012
    ..Taken together, our findings suggest that SPC-EN provides a powerful tool for characterizing connectivity involving a large number of correlated regions that span the entire brain...
  10. pmc How does a child solve 7 + 8? Decoding brain activity patterns associated with counting and retrieval strategies
    Soohyun Cho
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 5719, USA
    Dev Sci 14:989-1001. 2011
    ..More generally, our study illustrates how brain imaging and developmental research can be integrated to investigate fundamental aspects of neurocognitive development...
  11. pmc What difference does a year of schooling make? Maturation of brain response and connectivity between 2nd and 3rd grades during arithmetic problem solving
    Miriam Rosenberg-Lee
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5179, USA
    Neuroimage 57:796-808. 2011
    ..Our findings have important implications for understanding brain mechanisms mediating early maturation of mathematical skills and, more generally, for educational neuroscience...
  12. pmc Decoding subject-driven cognitive states with whole-brain connectivity patterns
    W R Shirer
    Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders FIND Lab, Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Cereb Cortex 22:158-65. 2012
    ..This approach should enable decoding a myriad of subject-driven cognitive states from brief imaging data samples...
  13. pmc Functional dissociations between four basic arithmetic operations in the human posterior parietal cortex: a cytoarchitectonic mapping study
    Miriam Rosenberg-Lee
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5179, USA
    Neuropsychologia 49:2592-608. 2011
    ..Our findings point to distribute representation of these processes in the human PPC and also help explain why lesion and previous imaging studies have yielded inconsistent findings...
  14. pmc Multivariate dynamical systems models for estimating causal interactions in fMRI
    Srikanth Ryali
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 5778, USA
    Neuroimage 54:807-23. 2011
    ..Our study suggests that VB estimation of MDS provides a robust method for estimating and interpreting causal network interactions in fMRI data...
  15. pmc Saliency, switching, attention and control: a network model of insula function
    Vinod Menon
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 780 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94304, USA
    Brain Struct Funct 214:655-67. 2010
    ..We suggest that this framework provides a parsimonious account of insula function in neurotypical adults, and may provide novel insights into the neural basis of disorders of affective and social cognition...
  16. pmc Dissociable connectivity within human angular gyrus and intraparietal sulcus: evidence from functional and structural connectivity
    Lucina Q Uddin
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94304, USA
    Cereb Cortex 20:2636-46. 2010
    ....