CHEMICAL RELEASE & IMMUNE SENSITIZATION BY DENTAL RESINS

Summary

Principal Investigator: Anahid Jewett
Abstract: DESCRIPTION (Adapted from investigator's Abstract): This is a competing continuation application whose overall goal is to ensure that resin-based materials which are placed onto teeth as part of dental care can continue to be used safely. Resin based materials which polymerize in the mouth are now used by dentists in many ways to help prevent tooth decay and for tooth repair and replacement. Bonding technologies, which are all based on this class of materials, are used for fissure sealing to help prevent decay, for bonding orthodontic brackets to teeth, and as part of many different types of tooth repair to improve appearance and function. It is very likely that new and modified materials of the same general type will continue to be developed and that the use of this type of material in dentistry will continue to increase in the coming years. The materials are very helpful to patients and have remarkably few negative side effects. However, severe allergic dermatitis in some dentists and other dental workers is linked to the use of the materials, and the incidence of such allergy appears to be increasing. Fortunately, allergic responses are less common in patients, but we do not know why this is so or whether it will continue to be so. Some patients experience pain in the dental pulp after resins are used in deep fillings, for reasons that may be related to direct chemical damage caused by released chemicals, by allergy to them, or to both. It has previously been shown in laboratory studies that two chemicals are released from these materials during the first days after they are placed on teeth. The first aim will be to confirm this release in experimental animals (guinea pigs), and study what happens to the chemicals in the body (their uptake, distribution, time of storage, breakdown and excretion). The second aim will be to study mechanisms of allergic responses to these chemicals at the cellular and molecular level using guinea pigs and mice. The third aim will be to determine whether there are differences between the risk of allergy with skin contact (as can occur in dental workers) relative to contact with the inside of the mouth and through tooth structure to the tooth pulp (as can occur in patients) in the same animals. The fourth aim will be to study allergic responses at the cellular and molecular level using blood and other tissues donated by volunteer dentists and other dental workers, to ensure that the experimental studies of the phenomenon using animal models and animal tissues in culture are valid. The studies described will help to prevent and treat adverse effects of this class of dental materials.
Funding Period: 1993-09-01 - 2005-04-30
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Resin monomer 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) is a potent inducer of apoptotic cell death in human and mouse cells
    A Paranjpe
    Division of Oral Biology and Oral Medicine, UCLA School of Dentistry, The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    J Dent Res 84:172-7. 2005
  2. pmc N-acetylcysteine protects dental pulp stromal cells from HEMA-induced apoptosis by inducing differentiation of the cells
    Avina Paranjpe
    The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, Dental Research Institute, Division of Oral Biology and Medicine, UCLA School of Dentistry and Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    Free Radic Biol Med 43:1394-408. 2007
  3. ncbi N-acetyl cysteine protects pulp cells from resin toxins in vivo
    A Paranjpe
    The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, The Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center JCCC, Dental Research Institute, Division of Oral Biology and Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    J Dent Res 87:537-41. 2008

Detail Information

Publications3

  1. ncbi Resin monomer 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) is a potent inducer of apoptotic cell death in human and mouse cells
    A Paranjpe
    Division of Oral Biology and Oral Medicine, UCLA School of Dentistry, The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    J Dent Res 84:172-7. 2005
    ....
  2. pmc N-acetylcysteine protects dental pulp stromal cells from HEMA-induced apoptosis by inducing differentiation of the cells
    Avina Paranjpe
    The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, Dental Research Institute, Division of Oral Biology and Medicine, UCLA School of Dentistry and Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    Free Radic Biol Med 43:1394-408. 2007
    ....
  3. ncbi N-acetyl cysteine protects pulp cells from resin toxins in vivo
    A Paranjpe
    The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, The Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center JCCC, Dental Research Institute, Division of Oral Biology and Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    J Dent Res 87:537-41. 2008
    ..The addition of N-acetyl cysteine prior to or concomitant with the application of restorative materials may be beneficial for the health and safety of dental patients...