Young Adult Environmental and Physical Activity Dynamics

Summary

Principal Investigator: Barry Popkin
Abstract: There is an increasing call for population-wide environmental/policy interventions to increase physical activity despite the lack of large-scale intervention or epidemiological research documenting the benefits of such changes. This longitudinal study will link contemporaneous geographic locations of respondents with physical environment variables and data from an exceptional dataset including quality physical activity data. We will use four study years (1985, 1992, 1995, and 2001) of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study [CARDIA], a longitudinal study of the antecedents and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in an ethnicity-, age- and sex-balanced cohort of 5,115 black and white young adults aged 18-30 years at baseline to examine relationships between environmental factors and physical activity. We will use complex longitudinal and spatial analytical models to explore relationships between environmental factors and physical activity. A critical element addressed will be residential self-selection, an issue of increasing concern as scholars attempt to understand how the environment affects physical activity. We will model physical activity as a function of covariates, some of which may be endogenous choices made by the individual. We will examine race/ethnic differentials in these effects and the impact of "the environment" shifts over time and through the lifecycle. The focus will be on examining how modifiable environmental factors will affect physical activity patterns among underserved communities and consequently will reduce ethnic and socioeconomic differentials in health status. The longitudinal analysis and the vast array of environmental measures used, coupled with the very high quality physical activity measures of CARDIA, allow us to capture the effects of the environment (and changes in location) on physical activity shifts. No study heretofore has had large-scale groupings and in-depth environmental measures over time to examine these issues in a dynamic manner.
Funding Period: 2004-09-17 - 2010-06-30
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Global nutrition dynamics: the world is shifting rapidly toward a diet linked with noncommunicable diseases
    Barry M Popkin
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 84:289-98. 2006
  2. pmc Diet quality and weight gain among black and white young adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study (1985-2005)
    DAISY ZAMORA
    Carolina Population Center and Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 92:784-93. 2010
  3. pmc Drinking caloric beverages increases the risk of adverse cardiometabolic outcomes in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study
    Kiyah J Duffey
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 92:954-9. 2010
  4. pmc Impact of water intake on energy intake and weight status: a systematic review
    Melissa C Daniels
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Nutr Rev 68:505-21. 2010
  5. pmc Longitudinal associations between neighborhood-level street network with walking, bicycling, and jogging: the CARDIA study
    Ningqi Hou
    Department of Health Studies, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Health Place 16:1206-15. 2010
  6. pmc Neighborhood socioeconomic status predictors of physical activity through young to middle adulthood: the CARDIA study
    Janne Boone-Heinonen
    Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
    Soc Sci Med 72:641-9. 2011
  7. pmc Longitudinal trends in gasoline price and physical activity: the CARDIA study
    Ningqi Hou
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA
    Prev Med 52:365-9. 2011
  8. pmc Are the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Associated With reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic risk factors? Twenty-year findings from the CARDIA study
    DAISY ZAMORA
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Diabetes Care 34:1183-5. 2011
  9. pmc Food portion patterns and trends among U.S. children and the relationship to total eating occasion size, 1977-2006
    Carmen Piernas
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA
    J Nutr 141:1159-64. 2011
  10. pmc Energy density, portion size, and eating occasions: contributions to increased energy intake in the United States, 1977-2006
    Kiyah J Duffey
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    PLoS Med 8:e1001050. 2011

Detail Information

Publications30

  1. ncbi Global nutrition dynamics: the world is shifting rapidly toward a diet linked with noncommunicable diseases
    Barry M Popkin
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 84:289-98. 2006
    ..The challenge to global health is clear...
  2. pmc Diet quality and weight gain among black and white young adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study (1985-2005)
    DAISY ZAMORA
    Carolina Population Center and Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 92:784-93. 2010
    ..Little is known about the long-term health consequences of following the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA; Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 2005)...
  3. pmc Drinking caloric beverages increases the risk of adverse cardiometabolic outcomes in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study
    Kiyah J Duffey
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 92:954-9. 2010
    ..Intake of caloric beverages is hypothesized to contribute to adverse health outcomes, but the beverages and populations studied vary considerably...
  4. pmc Impact of water intake on energy intake and weight status: a systematic review
    Melissa C Daniels
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Nutr Rev 68:505-21. 2010
    ..A need for randomized-controlled trials to confirm this role exists...
  5. pmc Longitudinal associations between neighborhood-level street network with walking, bicycling, and jogging: the CARDIA study
    Ningqi Hou
    Department of Health Studies, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
    Health Place 16:1206-15. 2010
    ..To investigate the differential association between neighborhood-level street network with walking, bicycling, and jogging by urbanicity and gender...
  6. pmc Neighborhood socioeconomic status predictors of physical activity through young to middle adulthood: the CARDIA study
    Janne Boone-Heinonen
    Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
    Soc Sci Med 72:641-9. 2011
    ....
  7. pmc Longitudinal trends in gasoline price and physical activity: the CARDIA study
    Ningqi Hou
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA
    Prev Med 52:365-9. 2011
    ..To investigate longitudinal associations between community-level gasoline price and physical activity (PA)...
  8. pmc Are the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Associated With reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic risk factors? Twenty-year findings from the CARDIA study
    DAISY ZAMORA
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Diabetes Care 34:1183-5. 2011
    ..To examine the prospective association between accordance with the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) and subsequent diabetes incidence and changes in cardiometabolic risk factors...
  9. pmc Food portion patterns and trends among U.S. children and the relationship to total eating occasion size, 1977-2006
    Carmen Piernas
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA
    J Nutr 141:1159-64. 2011
    ..Portion sizes continue to grow for selected foods. Fast-food chains appear to be linked with less healthful portion size increases for selected foods...
  10. pmc Energy density, portion size, and eating occasions: contributions to increased energy intake in the United States, 1977-2006
    Kiyah J Duffey
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    PLoS Med 8:e1001050. 2011
    ..Our objective was to examine the relative contribution of energy density (ED), portion size (PS), and the number of eating/drinking occasions (EOs) to changes in daily TE...
  11. pmc Fast food restaurants and food stores: longitudinal associations with diet in young to middle-aged adults: the CARDIA study
    Janne Boone-Heinonen
    Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Arch Intern Med 171:1162-70. 2011
    ....
  12. pmc Increased portion sizes from energy-dense foods affect total energy intake at eating occasions in US children and adolescents: patterns and trends by age group and sociodemographic characteristics, 1977-2006
    Carmen Piernas
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 94:1324-32. 2011
    ..Larger portion sizes of foods and beverages could affect overall energy intake at meals and promote overeating...
  13. pmc Dietary patterns matter: diet beverages and cardiometabolic risks in the longitudinal Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study
    Kiyah J Duffey
    Department of Nutrition, Gillings Global School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 95:909-15. 2012
    ..Although diet beverages are typically consumed to promote weight control, positive associations with increased cardiometabolic risk have been reported...
  14. pmc Water, hydration, and health
    Barry M Popkin
    Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27516, USA
    Nutr Rev 68:439-58. 2010
    ..This review provides suggestions for ways to examine water requirements and encourages more dialogue on this important topic...
  15. pmc Does hunger and satiety drive eating anymore? Increasing eating occasions and decreasing time between eating occasions in the United States
    Barry M Popkin
    Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina, 123 West Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 91:1342-7. 2010
    ..The design of dietary, metabolic, and intervention studies should reflect the meal patterning of free-living individuals, but this design has not been systematically reviewed recently...
  16. ncbi Adults with healthier dietary patterns have healthier beverage patterns
    Kiyah J Duffey
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA
    J Nutr 136:2901-7. 2006
    ..Increasing awareness of both the contribution of calorie-containing beverages to overall energy intake and dietary patterns associated with these beverages helps inform policies targeted at reducing energy intake in the population...
  17. ncbi Differential associations of fast food and restaurant food consumption with 3-y change in body mass index: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study
    Kiyah J Duffey
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 85:201-8. 2007
    ..Away-from-home food consumption has rapidly increased, though little is known about the independent associations of restaurant food and fast food intake with body mass index (BMI) and BMI change...
  18. ncbi A short history of beverages and how our body treats them
    A Wolf
    Schools of Medicine and Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
    Obes Rev 9:151-64. 2008
    ..Second, carbohydrate and alcohol-containing beverages may produce an incomplete satiation sequence which prevents us from becoming satiated on these beverages...
  19. pmc Validation of a GIS facilities database: quantification and implications of error
    Janne E Boone
    Department of Nutrition, Schools of Public Health and Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Ann Epidemiol 18:371-7. 2008
    ..To validate a commercial database of community-level physical activity facilities that can be used in future research examining associations between access to physical activity facilities and individual-level physical activity and obesity...
  20. pmc Fifteen-year longitudinal trends in walking patterns and their impact on weight change
    Penny Gordon-Larsen
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 89:19-26. 2009
    ..Although walking is the most popular leisure-time activity for adults, few long-term, longitudinal studies have examined the association between walking, an affordable and accessible form of physical activity, and weight gain...
  21. pmc High-fructose corn syrup: is this what's for dinner?
    Kiyah J Duffey
    Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27516, USA
    Am J Clin Nutr 88:1722S-1732S. 2008
    ..Research on trends in consumption of added sugar and high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in the United States has largely focused on calorically sweetened beverages and ignored other sources...
  22. pmc Walking for prevention of cardiovascular disease in men and women: a systematic review of observational studies
    J Boone-Heinonen
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Obes Rev 10:204-17. 2009
    ....
  23. pmc Active commuting and cardiovascular disease risk: the CARDIA study
    Penny Gordon-Larsen
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center, Chapel Hill, NC 27516 3997, USA
    Arch Intern Med 169:1216-23. 2009
    ..There is little research on the association of lifestyle exercise, such as active commuting (walking or biking to work), with obesity, fitness, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors...
  24. pmc A walk (or cycle) to the park: active transit to neighborhood amenities, the CARDIA study
    Janne Boone-Heinonen
    Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Am J Prev Med 37:285-92. 2009
    ..Building on known associations between active commuting and reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, this study examines active transit to neighborhood amenities and differences between walking and cycling for transportation...
  25. pmc Regular consumption from fast food establishments relative to other restaurants is differentially associated with metabolic outcomes in young adults
    Kiyah J Duffey
    Department of Nutrition, Schools of Public Health and Medicine, and 4Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27510, USA
    J Nutr 139:2113-8. 2009
    ..15 kg (CI, 0.06, 0.24), respectively] and waist circumference [0.08 cm (CI, 0.02, 0.14) and 0.12 cm (CI, 0.04, 0.20), respectively]. Fast food consumption may be an important target for the prevention of adverse metabolic health outcomes...
  26. pmc Snacking increased among U.S. adults between 1977 and 2006
    Carmen Piernas
    Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
    J Nutr 140:325-32. 2010
    ..More research is needed to gain a better understanding of the implications for overall energy intake and energy imbalance...
  27. pmc Trends in snacking among U.S. children
    Carmen Piernas
    Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
    Health Aff (Millwood) 29:398-404. 2010
    ..The largest increases have been in salty snacks and candy. Desserts and sweetened beverages remain the major sources of calories from snacks...
  28. pmc Food price and diet and health outcomes: 20 years of the CARDIA Study
    Kiyah J Duffey
    Department of Nutrition, Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27516 3997, USA
    Arch Intern Med 170:420-6. 2010
    ..Despite surging interest in taxation as a policy to address poor food choice, US research directly examining the association of food prices with individual intake is scarce...
  29. pmc Causes of increased energy intake among children in the U.S., 1977-2010
    Kiyah J Duffey
    Carolina Population Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Am J Prev Med 44:e1-8. 2013
    ....