Engineered lipid vesicles as potent vaccine vectors for HIV

Summary

Principal Investigator: Darrell J Irvine
Abstract: DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Successful vaccination against HIV will likely require the generation of coordinated humoral and cellular immunity. Among current strategies, protein vaccines fail to stimulate cellular responses, while plasmid DNA or live recombinant vectors capable of promoting cellular and humoral responses together face other issues, such as potency in humans (DNA), or challenges of vector-specific immunity and/or safety (live vectors). We propose here a new class of lipid-based vesicles for protein vaccine delivery, composed of multilamellar lipid vesicles stabilized by the introduction of crosslinks connecting the bilayers of the structure. These novel materials are synthesized and encapsulate protein antigens in a mild all-aqueous process, favoring the preservation of epitopes on complex antigens. In preliminary studies, we show that these novel vaccine carriers can be repeatedly administered for homologous boosting: Following a prime and 2 booster immunizations with a model antigen, these particles massively expand antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells, to the best of our knowledge substantially stronger than any previously reported protein vaccine. These T-cells were functional in terms of their capacity to produce IFN-?, and formed a substantial memory population a month after the second boost. In other preliminary studies, we found that this same system drives potent humoral responses against a candidate malaria antigen. Based on these promising initial results, we propose here to test the promise of this new vaccine delivery approach in the context of HIV vaccination, aiming to determine whether potent, durable T-cell and humoral responses can be elicited against HIV gag and env antigens. In addition, we will explore whether particular aspects of this vaccine system (e.g., the deposition of particles at the injection site) can be exploited to direct the localization of memory cells to key mucosal tissue sites that could promote protection against HIV infection. Our specific aims are: (1) How do the humoral and cellular responses to gag and env antigens evolve as a function of antigen dose and boosting with ICMV particle vaccination? (2) Are alternative clinically-relevant TLR agonist/danger signals capable of eliciting stronger immune responses than MPLA when delivered by ICMV vectors? (3) How do particles retained at the injection site influence memory/effector cell trafficking following ICMV particle immunization, compared to traditional protein immunization? (4) Can microneedle delivery be used to allow repeated needle-free particle boosting to be performed, without the need for refrigerated vaccines? Identification of ICMV formulations that can raise immune responses against HIV immunogens comparable to those shown in our preliminary data for OVA or malaria antigens will set the stage for subsequent testing in macaque protection models (either using ICMV vaccination alone or in tandem with other strong HIV vaccine candidates. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: In this application, we propose research aimed at testing the promise of a new class of lipid-based nanoparticles for vaccination against HIV. These studies will shed important new light on the mechanisms of immune stimulation by this nanoparticle vaccine, and if successful, these materials will provide a powerful hew vaccine complementary to existing platforms being tested in the effort to develop a protective AIDS vaccine.
Funding Period: 2011-03-01 - 2016-02-29
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Enhancing humoral responses to a malaria antigen with nanoparticle vaccines that expand Tfh cells and promote germinal center induction
    James J Moon
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:1080-5. 2012
  2. pmc Engineering synthetic vaccines using cues from natural immunity
    Darrell J Irvine
    1 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 2 Department of Biological Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 3 Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 4 The Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, East 149 13th Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA 5 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 4000 Jones Bridge Road, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815, USA
    Nat Mater 12:978-90. 2013
  3. pmc Generation of effector memory T cell-based mucosal and systemic immunity with pulmonary nanoparticle vaccination
    Adrienne V Li
    Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Sci Transl Med 5:204ra130. 2013
  4. pmc Implantable silk composite microneedles for programmable vaccine release kinetics and enhanced immunogenicity in transcutaneous immunization
    Peter C Demuth
    Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA
    Adv Healthc Mater 3:47-58. 2014
  5. pmc Polymer multilayer tattooing for enhanced DNA vaccination
    Peter C Demuth
    Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Nat Mater 12:367-76. 2013
  6. pmc Releasable layer-by-layer assembly of stabilized lipid nanocapsules on microneedles for enhanced transcutaneous vaccine delivery
    Peter C Demuth
    Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States
    ACS Nano 6:8041-51. 2012
  7. pmc Engineering nano- and microparticles to tune immunity
    James J Moon
    Dept of Materials Science and Eng, Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA
    Adv Mater 24:3724-46. 2012
  8. pmc Structure-based programming of lymph-node targeting in molecular vaccines
    Haipeng Liu
    1 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 2 Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 3 Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Nature 507:519-22. 2014

Research Grants

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. pmc Enhancing humoral responses to a malaria antigen with nanoparticle vaccines that expand Tfh cells and promote germinal center induction
    James J Moon
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:1080-5. 2012
    ..Thus, NP vaccines may be a promising strategy to enhance the durability, breadth, and potency of humoral immunity by enhancing key elements of the B-cell response...
  2. pmc Engineering synthetic vaccines using cues from natural immunity
    Darrell J Irvine
    1 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 2 Department of Biological Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 3 Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 4 The Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, East 149 13th Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA 5 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 4000 Jones Bridge Road, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815, USA
    Nat Mater 12:978-90. 2013
    ..Here we describe recent advances in the design of synthetic materials to direct immune responses, highlighting successes and challenges in prophylactic, therapeutic and tolerance-inducing vaccines. ..
  3. pmc Generation of effector memory T cell-based mucosal and systemic immunity with pulmonary nanoparticle vaccination
    Adrienne V Li
    Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
    Sci Transl Med 5:204ra130. 2013
    ..Together, these data suggest that targeting cross-presentation-promoting particulate vaccines to the APC-rich pulmonary mucosa can promote robust T cell responses for protection of mucosal surfaces...
  4. pmc Implantable silk composite microneedles for programmable vaccine release kinetics and enhanced immunogenicity in transcutaneous immunization
    Peter C Demuth
    Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA
    Adv Healthc Mater 3:47-58. 2014
    ....
  5. pmc Polymer multilayer tattooing for enhanced DNA vaccination
    Peter C Demuth
    Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Nat Mater 12:367-76. 2013
    ....
  6. pmc Releasable layer-by-layer assembly of stabilized lipid nanocapsules on microneedles for enhanced transcutaneous vaccine delivery
    Peter C Demuth
    Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States
    ACS Nano 6:8041-51. 2012
    ..These results highlight the potential of lipid nanocapsules delivered by microneedles as a promising platform for noninvasive vaccine delivery applications...
  7. pmc Engineering nano- and microparticles to tune immunity
    James J Moon
    Dept of Materials Science and Eng, Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA
    Adv Mater 24:3724-46. 2012
    ..This progress report describes recent advances in the design of micro- and nano-particles for immunotherapies and diagnostics...
  8. pmc Structure-based programming of lymph-node targeting in molecular vaccines
    Haipeng Liu
    1 Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 2 Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 3 Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Nature 507:519-22. 2014
    ..Amph-vaccines provide a simple, broadly applicable strategy to simultaneously increase the potency and safety of subunit vaccines. ..

Research Grants30

  1. Delivery of Particle Vaccines to Control Trafficking Patterns of T Cells
    James Jaehyun Moon; Fiscal Year: 2013
    ..Such vaccine platform could be applied as novel vaccination strategies against infectious diseases and would have a major impact on public health. ..