Philip R Corlett

Summary

Affiliation: Yale University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Illusions and delusions: relating experimentally-induced false memories to anomalous experiences and ideas
    Philip R Corlett
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Brain Mapping Unit Cambridge, UK
    Front Behav Neurosci 3:53. 2009
  2. pmc Ketamine effects on memory reconsolidation favor a learning model of delusions
    Philip R Corlett
    Department of Psychiatry, Ribicoff Research Facility, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e65088. 2013
  3. pmc The neurobiology of schizotypy: fronto-striatal prediction error signal correlates with delusion-like beliefs in healthy people
    P R Corlett
    Connecticut Mental Health Center, Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, Ribicoff Research Facility 34 Park Street, New Haven, CT 06519, USA
    Neuropsychologia 50:3612-20. 2012
  4. pmc Why do delusions persist?
    Philip R Corlett
    Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Yale University New Haven, CT 06519, USA
    Front Hum Neurosci 3:12. 2009
  5. pmc Toward a neurobiology of delusions
    P R Corlett
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, Connecticut Mental Health Centre, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facility, 34 Park Street, New Haven, CT 06519, USA
    Prog Neurobiol 92:345-69. 2010
  6. pmc Glutamatergic model psychoses: prediction error, learning, and inference
    Philip R Corlett
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06519, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 36:294-315. 2011
  7. pmc Individual differences in psychotic effects of ketamine are predicted by brain function measured under placebo
    Garry D Honey
    Department of Psychiatry, Brain Mapping Unit and Behavioural and Clinical Neurosciences Institute, University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 28:6295-303. 2008
  8. ncbi request reprint Frontal responses during learning predict vulnerability to the psychotogenic effects of ketamine: linking cognition, brain activity, and psychosis
    Philip R Corlett
    Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 63:611-21. 2006
  9. pmc The neural underpinnings of associative learning in health and psychosis: how can performance be preserved when brain responses are abnormal?
    Graham K Murray
    Brain Mapping Unit, University of Cambridge, Box 189, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK
    Schizophr Bull 36:465-71. 2010
  10. pmc Functional dysconnectivity in schizophrenia associated with attentional modulation of motor function
    Garry D Honey
    University of Cambridge, Department of Psychiatry, Cambridge, UK
    Brain 128:2597-611. 2005

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications26

  1. pmc Illusions and delusions: relating experimentally-induced false memories to anomalous experiences and ideas
    Philip R Corlett
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Brain Mapping Unit Cambridge, UK
    Front Behav Neurosci 3:53. 2009
    ..We discuss this finding in terms of the salience hypothesis and of a broader Bayesian framework of perception and cognition which emphasizes the salience both of predictable and unpredictable experiences...
  2. pmc Ketamine effects on memory reconsolidation favor a learning model of delusions
    Philip R Corlett
    Department of Psychiatry, Ribicoff Research Facility, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e65088. 2013
    ..These results suggest a link between altered prediction error, memory strength and psychosis. They point to a core disruption that may explain not only the emergence of delusional beliefs but also their persistence...
  3. pmc The neurobiology of schizotypy: fronto-striatal prediction error signal correlates with delusion-like beliefs in healthy people
    P R Corlett
    Connecticut Mental Health Center, Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, Ribicoff Research Facility 34 Park Street, New Haven, CT 06519, USA
    Neuropsychologia 50:3612-20. 2012
    ....
  4. pmc Why do delusions persist?
    Philip R Corlett
    Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Yale University New Haven, CT 06519, USA
    Front Hum Neurosci 3:12. 2009
    ..We argue that, under the influence of excessive prediction error, delusional beliefs are repeatedly reconsolidated, strengthening them so that they persist, apparently impervious to contradiction...
  5. pmc Toward a neurobiology of delusions
    P R Corlett
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, Connecticut Mental Health Centre, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facility, 34 Park Street, New Haven, CT 06519, USA
    Prog Neurobiol 92:345-69. 2010
    ..The present model attempts to provide a framework through which we can build a mechanistic and translational understanding of these puzzling symptoms...
  6. pmc Glutamatergic model psychoses: prediction error, learning, and inference
    Philip R Corlett
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06519, USA
    Neuropsychopharmacology 36:294-315. 2011
    ....
  7. pmc Individual differences in psychotic effects of ketamine are predicted by brain function measured under placebo
    Garry D Honey
    Department of Psychiatry, Brain Mapping Unit and Behavioural and Clinical Neurosciences Institute, University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, United Kingdom
    J Neurosci 28:6295-303. 2008
    ..These results demonstrate precise and predictive brain markers for individual profiles of vulnerability to drug-induced psychosis...
  8. ncbi request reprint Frontal responses during learning predict vulnerability to the psychotogenic effects of ketamine: linking cognition, brain activity, and psychosis
    Philip R Corlett
    Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England
    Arch Gen Psychiatry 63:611-21. 2006
    ..Establishing a neurobiological account of delusion formation that links cognitive processes, brain activity, and symptoms is important to furthering our understanding of psychosis...
  9. pmc The neural underpinnings of associative learning in health and psychosis: how can performance be preserved when brain responses are abnormal?
    Graham K Murray
    Brain Mapping Unit, University of Cambridge, Box 189, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK
    Schizophr Bull 36:465-71. 2010
    ..The findings suggest that a combination of these factors may resolve the question of why performance is sometimes preserved when brain patterns are disrupted...
  10. pmc Functional dysconnectivity in schizophrenia associated with attentional modulation of motor function
    Garry D Honey
    University of Cambridge, Department of Psychiatry, Cambridge, UK
    Brain 128:2597-611. 2005
    ..Furthermore, these data show evidence of additional functional deficits in patients with negative symptoms, deficits which may explain the accompanying attentional impairment...
  11. pmc Exploring the impact of ketamine on the experience of illusory body ownership
    Hannah L Morgan
    Department of Psychiatry, Brain Mapping Unit, University of Cambridge, Downing Site, United Kingdom
    Biol Psychiatry 69:35-41. 2011
    ..Given the evidence that ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist reproduces symptoms of schizophrenia, we sought to determine whether the rubber-hand illusion is augmented by ketamine...
  12. doi request reprint N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist effects on prefrontal cortical connectivity better model early than chronic schizophrenia
    Alan Anticevic
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut
    Biol Psychiatry 77:569-80. 2015
    ..This study compared N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist effects in healthy volunteers with stages of schizophrenia with respect to PFC functional connectivity...
  13. pmc The effects of a subpsychotic dose of ketamine on recognition and source memory for agency: implications for pharmacological modelling of core symptoms of schizophrenia
    Garry D Honey
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, UK
    Neuropsychopharmacology 31:413-23. 2006
    ..This difference may account for the pattern of psychopathology induced by ketamine...
  14. pmc The role of default network deactivation in cognition and disease
    Alan Anticevic
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Trends Cogn Sci 16:584-92. 2012
    ..g., mind-wandering), and illustrates the functional significance of DMN suppression deficits in severe mental illness...
  15. pmc NMDA receptor function in large-scale anticorrelated neural systems with implications for cognition and schizophrenia
    Alan Anticevic
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:16720-5. 2012
    ..Together, the present findings establish links between glutamate's role in the organization of large-scale anticorrelated neural systems, cognition, and symptoms associated with schizophrenia in humans...
  16. pmc Ketamine administration in healthy volunteers reproduces aberrant agency experiences associated with schizophrenia
    James W Moore
    a Department of Psychiatry, Brain Mapping Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Cogn Neuropsychiatry 16:364-81. 2011
    ..Previous research has found that the magnitude of binding is exaggerated in patients with schizophrenia. We therefore investigated whether ketamine administration to otherwise healthy adults induced a similar pattern of binding...
  17. pmc Linking microcircuit dysfunction to cognitive impairment: effects of disinhibition associated with schizophrenia in a cortical working memory model
    John D Murray
    Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    Cereb Cortex 24:859-72. 2014
    ..Our findings identify specific ways by which cortical disinhibition affects WM, suggesting new experimental designs for probing the brain mechanisms of WM deficits in schizophrenia. ..
  18. pmc Incentive motivation in first-episode psychosis: a behavioural study
    Graham K Murray
    Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    BMC Psychiatry 8:34. 2008
    ..It has been proposed that there are abnormalities in incentive motivational processing in psychosis, possibly secondary to subcortical dopamine abnormalities, but few empirical studies have addressed this issue...
  19. pmc Aberrant learning and memory in addiction
    Mary M Torregrossa
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06508, USA
    Neurobiol Learn Mem 96:609-23. 2011
    ....
  20. ncbi request reprint Prediction error during retrospective revaluation of causal associations in humans: fMRI evidence in favor of an associative model of learning
    Philip R Corlett
    Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Addenbrooke s Hospital, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, United Kingdom
    Neuron 44:877-88. 2004
    ..Our results support a modified associative account of retrospective revaluation and demonstrate the potential of functional neuroimaging as a tool for evaluating competing learning models...
  21. doi request reprint Two cases of delayed-onset suicidal ideation, dysphoria and anxiety after ketamine infusion in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and a history of major depressive disorder
    Mark J Niciu
    Yale University, Department of Psychiatry Connecticut Mental Health Center CMHC, Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit CNRU, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
    J Psychopharmacol 27:651-4. 2013
    ..We conclude that there remains insufficient data on therapeutic ketamine in the presence of comorbid psychiatric disorders to promote its off-label use in a non-research milieu. ..
  22. pmc Effects of methamphetamine administration on information gathering during probabilistic reasoning in healthy humans
    Anna O Ermakova
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 9:e102683. 2014
    ..028). Our results suggest that information gathering during probabilistic reasoning is a stable trait, not easily modified by dopaminergic or noradrenergic modulation. ..
  23. pmc Prediction error, ketamine and psychosis: An updated model
    Philip R Corlett
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
    J Psychopharmacol 30:1145-1155. 2016
    ..However, challenges remain. We attempt to address some of these concerns and suggest future directions, incorporating other symptoms into the model, building towards better understanding of psychosis...
  24. pmc Ketamine-Induced Hallucinations
    Albert R Powers Iii
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Conn, USA
    Psychopathology 48:376-85. 2015
    ..However, auditory verbal hallucinations, a hallmark symptom of schizophrenia, have not been reported consistently in healthy volunteers even at high doses of ketamine...
  25. pmc Memories reactivated under ketamine are subsequently stronger: A potential pre-clinical behavioral model of psychosis
    Michael J Honsberger
    Yale University Department of Psychiatry, Division of Molecular Psychiatry, Connecticut Mental Health Center, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facility, 34 Park Street, New Haven 06511, United States
    Schizophr Res 164:227-33. 2015
    ..To extend the scope of this model, we investigated the effect of administration of low dose systemic ketamine on memory in a rodent model of memory reconsolidation...
  26. pmc Cognition-emotion dysinteraction in schizophrenia
    Alan Anticevic
    Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit, Ribicoff Research Facilities, Connecticut Mental Health Center, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine New Haven, CT, USA
    Front Psychol 3:392. 2012
    ..We conclude with a brief treatment of the neurobiology of schizophrenia and the need to close our explanatory gap between cellular-level hypotheses and complex behavioral symptoms observed in this illness...