C Crowder

Summary

Affiliation: Washington University School of Medicine
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Hypoxic preconditioning requires the apoptosis protein CED-4 in C. elegans
    Nupur Dasgupta
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Curr Biol 17:1954-9. 2007
  2. ncbi request reprint Behavioral effects of volatile anesthetics in Caenorhabditis elegans
    C M Crowder
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA
    Anesthesiology 85:901-12. 1996
  3. pmc Divergent mechanisms controlling hypoxic sensitivity and lifespan by the DAF-2/insulin/IGF-receptor pathway
    Meghann E Mabon
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e7937. 2009
  4. ncbi request reprint Does natural selection explain the universal response of metazoans to volatile anesthetics?
    C Michael Crowder
    Department of Anesthesiology and Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Anesth Analg 107:862-3. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Ethanol targets: a BK channel cocktail in C. elegans
    C Michael Crowder
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S Euclid Ave, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Trends Neurosci 27:579-82. 2004
  6. ncbi request reprint A quantitative genetic approach towards volatile anesthetic mechanisms in C. elegans
    B van Swinderen
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Toxicol Lett 100:309-17. 1998
  7. ncbi request reprint Xenon acts by inhibition of non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission in Caenorhabditis elegans
    Peter Nagele
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    Anesthesiology 103:508-13. 2005
  8. pmc Resistance to volatile anesthetics by mutations enhancing excitatory neurotransmitter release in Caenorhabditis elegans
    Ammar H Hawasli
    Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Genetics 168:831-43. 2004
  9. ncbi request reprint The sodium-activated potassium channel is encoded by a member of the Slo gene family
    Alex Yuan
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S Euclid Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Neuron 37:765-73. 2003
  10. ncbi request reprint Regulation of hypoxic death in C. elegans by the insulin/IGF receptor homolog DAF-2
    Barbara A Scott
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Science 296:2388-91. 2002

Research Grants

  1. MUTANT ANALYSIS OF GENES CONTROLLING ANESTHETIC ACTION
    C Michael Crowder; Fiscal Year: 2009

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications18

  1. pmc Hypoxic preconditioning requires the apoptosis protein CED-4 in C. elegans
    Nupur Dasgupta
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Curr Biol 17:1954-9. 2007
    ..CED-4/Apaf-1 is essential for HP in C. elegans and acts through a mechanism independent of the classical apoptosis pathway...
  2. ncbi request reprint Behavioral effects of volatile anesthetics in Caenorhabditis elegans
    C M Crowder
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA
    Anesthesiology 85:901-12. 1996
    ..C. elegans is immobilized by volatile anesthetics only at high concentrations and with an unusually slow time course. Here other behavioral dysfunctions are considered as anesthetic endpoints in C. elegans...
  3. pmc Divergent mechanisms controlling hypoxic sensitivity and lifespan by the DAF-2/insulin/IGF-receptor pathway
    Meghann E Mabon
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 4:e7937. 2009
    ..However, RNAi knockdown of these genes did not prolong lifespan. These genes definitively separate the mechanisms of hypoxic sensitivity and lifespan and identify biological strategies to survive hypoxic injury...
  4. ncbi request reprint Does natural selection explain the universal response of metazoans to volatile anesthetics?
    C Michael Crowder
    Department of Anesthesiology and Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Anesth Analg 107:862-3. 2008
  5. ncbi request reprint Ethanol targets: a BK channel cocktail in C. elegans
    C Michael Crowder
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S Euclid Ave, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Trends Neurosci 27:579-82. 2004
    ..elegans. Electrophysiological data recorded in vivo are consistent with a model in which ethanol potentiation of SLO-1 produces intoxication in C. elegans by reducing excitatory neurotransmitter release...
  6. ncbi request reprint A quantitative genetic approach towards volatile anesthetic mechanisms in C. elegans
    B van Swinderen
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Toxicol Lett 100:309-17. 1998
    ..Congenic strains for chromosome V confirmed these loci and offer the means to finely map them for positional cloning...
  7. ncbi request reprint Xenon acts by inhibition of non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission in Caenorhabditis elegans
    Peter Nagele
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    Anesthesiology 103:508-13. 2005
    ..Here, the authors ask in Caenorhabditis elegans whether xenon, like nitrous oxide, acts by a NMDA receptor-mediated mechanism...
  8. pmc Resistance to volatile anesthetics by mutations enhancing excitatory neurotransmitter release in Caenorhabditis elegans
    Ammar H Hawasli
    Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Genetics 168:831-43. 2004
    ..These results strengthen the link between transmitter release and VA action...
  9. ncbi request reprint The sodium-activated potassium channel is encoded by a member of the Slo gene family
    Alex Yuan
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S Euclid Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Neuron 37:765-73. 2003
    ..We demonstrate in C. elegans that slo-2 mutants are hypersensitive to hypoxia, suggesting a conserved role for the slo-2 gene subfamily...
  10. ncbi request reprint Regulation of hypoxic death in C. elegans by the insulin/IGF receptor homolog DAF-2
    Barbara A Scott
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Science 296:2388-91. 2002
    ....
  11. pmc A Caenorhabditis elegans pheromone antagonizes volatile anesthetic action through a go-coupled pathway
    Bruno van Swinderen
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Genetics 161:109-19. 2002
    ..A model in which sensory neurons transduce the pheromone activity through antagonistic Go and Gq pathways, modulating VA action against neurotransmitter release machinery, is proposed...
  12. pmc Survival from hypoxia in C. elegans by inactivation of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases
    Lori L Anderson
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Science 323:630-3. 2009
    ..Thus, translational suppression produces hypoxia resistance, in part by reducing unfolded protein toxicity...
  13. pmc An evolutionarily conserved presynaptic protein is required for isoflurane sensitivity in Caenorhabditis elegans
    Laura B Metz
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110 1010, USA
    Anesthesiology 107:971-82. 2007
    ..The mechanism underlying this antagonism may identify presynaptic anesthetic targets relevant to human anesthesia...
  14. pmc Autophagy protects against hypoxic injury in C. elegans
    Victor Samokhvalov
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110 1010, USA
    Autophagy 4:1034-41. 2008
    ..These results argue that inhibition of autophagy sensitizes C. elegans and its cells to hypoxic injury and that this sensitization is blocked or circumvented when either of the two major cell-death mechanisms is inhibited...
  15. pmc Protein misfolding induces hypoxic preconditioning via a subset of the unfolded protein response machinery
    Xianrong R Mao
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Mol Cell Biol 30:5033-42. 2010
    ..These data suggest a model where hypoxia-induced misfolded proteins trigger the activation of IRE-1, which along with GCN-2 controls an adaptive response that is essential to HP...
  16. pmc Systematic identification of gene activities promoting hypoxic death
    Meghann E Mabon
    The Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences, Program in Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Genetics 181:483-96. 2009
    ..The results of the screen provide the first systematic picture of the genetic determinants of hypoxic sensitivity. The number and diversity of genes indicates a surprisingly nonredundant genetic network promoting hypoxic sensitivity...
  17. ncbi request reprint Volatile anesthetics bind rat synaptic snare proteins
    Peter Nagele
    Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Anesthesiology 103:768-78. 2005
    ..Motivated by this hypothesis, the authors measured the ability of syntaxin 1A and proteins that interact with syntaxin to bind to halothane and isoflurane...
  18. doi request reprint Volatile anesthetic preconditioning present in the invertebrate Caenorhabditis elegans
    Baosen Jia
    Department of Anesthesiology, Clinical Surgery Branch, General Hospital of People s Liberation Army, Haidian District, Beijing, China
    Anesthesiology 108:426-33. 2008
    ..A more genetically tractable model of VA preconditioning would be extremely useful. Here, the authors report the development of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model of VA preconditioning...

Research Grants1

  1. MUTANT ANALYSIS OF GENES CONTROLLING ANESTHETIC ACTION
    C Michael Crowder; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..The combination of genetics and electrophysiology is synergistic and essential to define the relevant VA targets and how VAs affect their function. ..