David C Beebe

Summary

Affiliation: Washington University School of Medicine
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi Preserve the (intraocular) environment: the importance of maintaining normal oxygen gradients in the eye
    David C Beebe
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S Euclid Ave Campus Box 8096, St Louis, MO, 63110, USA
    Jpn J Ophthalmol 58:225-31. 2014
  2. pmc Maintaining transparency: a review of the developmental physiology and pathophysiology of two avascular tissues
    David C Beebe
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Semin Cell Dev Biol 19:125-33. 2008
  3. pmc Oxidative damage and the prevention of age-related cataracts
    David C Beebe
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Ophthalmic Res 44:155-65. 2010
  4. pmc Vitreoretinal influences on lens function and cataract
    David C Beebe
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:1293-300. 2011
  5. ncbi Contributions by members of the TGFbeta superfamily to lens development
    David Beebe
    Dept Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Int J Dev Biol 48:845-56. 2004
  6. pmc The type I BMP receptors, Bmpr1a and Acvr1, activate multiple signaling pathways to regulate lens formation
    Ramya Rajagopal
    Departments of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Dev Biol 335:305-16. 2009
  7. pmc FGF-regulated BMP signaling is required for eyelid closure and to specify conjunctival epithelial cell fate
    Jie Huang
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Development 136:1741-50. 2009
  8. pmc The tumor suppressor gene Trp53 protects the mouse lens against posterior subcapsular cataracts and the BMP receptor Acvr1 acts as a tumor suppressor in the lens
    Luke A Wiley
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Dis Model Mech 4:484-95. 2011
  9. pmc The tumor suppressor merlin is required for cell cycle exit, terminal differentiation, and cell polarity in the developing murine lens
    Luke A Wiley
    Departments of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 51:3611-8. 2010
  10. pmc The function of FGF signaling in the lens placode
    Claudia M Garcia
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Dev Biol 351:176-85. 2011

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications56

  1. doi Preserve the (intraocular) environment: the importance of maintaining normal oxygen gradients in the eye
    David C Beebe
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S Euclid Ave Campus Box 8096, St Louis, MO, 63110, USA
    Jpn J Ophthalmol 58:225-31. 2014
    ..Delaying removal of the lens for as long as possible after vitrectomy would be an important step in delaying ocular hypertension and glaucoma progression. ..
  2. pmc Maintaining transparency: a review of the developmental physiology and pathophysiology of two avascular tissues
    David C Beebe
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Semin Cell Dev Biol 19:125-33. 2008
    ..Although they are both transparent, corneal pathology is associated with an insufficient supply of oxygen, while lens pathology may involve excessive exposure to oxygen...
  3. pmc Oxidative damage and the prevention of age-related cataracts
    David C Beebe
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Ophthalmic Res 44:155-65. 2010
    ..Cataracts are often considered to be an unavoidable consequence of aging. Oxidative damage is a major cause or consequence of cortical and nuclear cataracts, the most common types of age-related cataracts...
  4. pmc Vitreoretinal influences on lens function and cataract
    David C Beebe
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:1293-300. 2011
    ..Oxygen reaches the lens nucleus, increasing protein oxidation and aggregation and leading to nuclear cataract. We suggest that maintaining low pO(2) around the lens should prevent the formation of nuclear cataracts...
  5. ncbi Contributions by members of the TGFbeta superfamily to lens development
    David Beebe
    Dept Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Int J Dev Biol 48:845-56. 2004
    ..This approach may also provide a useful way to define the downstream pathways that are activated by these receptors during the development of the lens and other tissues...
  6. pmc The type I BMP receptors, Bmpr1a and Acvr1, activate multiple signaling pathways to regulate lens formation
    Ramya Rajagopal
    Departments of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Dev Biol 335:305-16. 2009
    ..A key function of Smad-independent BMP receptor signaling may be reorganization of actin cytoskeleton to drive lens invagination...
  7. pmc FGF-regulated BMP signaling is required for eyelid closure and to specify conjunctival epithelial cell fate
    Jie Huang
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Development 136:1741-50. 2009
    ..A second row of eyelashes is a feature of human lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome, which is associated with mutations in FOXC2...
  8. pmc The tumor suppressor gene Trp53 protects the mouse lens against posterior subcapsular cataracts and the BMP receptor Acvr1 acts as a tumor suppressor in the lens
    Luke A Wiley
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Dis Model Mech 4:484-95. 2011
    ..Acvr1 acts as a tumor suppressor in the lens. Enhancing p53 function in the lens could contribute to the prevention of steroid- and radiation-induced posterior subcapsular cataracts...
  9. pmc The tumor suppressor merlin is required for cell cycle exit, terminal differentiation, and cell polarity in the developing murine lens
    Luke A Wiley
    Departments of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 51:3611-8. 2010
    ..The lens provides an assay system to identify pathways critical for fiber cell differentiation and to test therapies for the tumors that occur in patients with NF2...
  10. pmc The function of FGF signaling in the lens placode
    Claudia M Garcia
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Dev Biol 351:176-85. 2011
    ..Since the expression of proteins required for lens formation was not altered in the knockout placode cells, we can conclude that FGF signaling from the optic vesicle is not required for lens induction...
  11. pmc The function of VEGF-A in lens development: formation of the hyaloid capillary network and protection against transient nuclear cataracts
    Claudia M Garcia
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Exp Eye Res 88:270-6. 2009
    ..Further study is needed to explain the formation of the mild opacities seen in some lenses lacking Vegfa and their regression later in life...
  12. ncbi Oxygen distribution in the rabbit eye and oxygen consumption by the lens
    Ying Bo Shui
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 47:1571-80. 2006
    ..For a better understanding of the metabolism of oxygen in the eye, oxygen distribution was mapped in the intraocular fluids, and the rate of oxygen consumption by the lens in rabbits breathing different levels of oxygen was calculated...
  13. ncbi Expression and regulation of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-crystallins in mammalian lens epithelial cells
    Xiaohui Wang
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 45:3608-19. 2004
    ..To resolve this apparent discrepancy, 14 crystallin mRNAs were examined and the expression and subcellular distribution of selected crystallin proteins in lens epithelial cells determined...
  14. pmc Oxygen distribution in the human eye: relevance to the etiology of open-angle glaucoma after vitrectomy
    Carla J Siegfried
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 51:5731-8. 2010
    ..This study was conducted in patients to determine whether these procedures are associated with increased exposure of the trabecular meshwork to oxygen...
  15. pmc The mechanism of lens placode formation: a case of matrix-mediated morphogenesis
    Jie Huang
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Dev Biol 355:32-42. 2011
    ....
  16. doi Racial differences in ocular oxidative metabolism: implications for ocular disease
    Carla J Siegfried
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Arch Ophthalmol 129:849-54. 2011
    ..To compare the Po(2) distribution in different regions in the eyes of patients undergoing intraocular surgery...
  17. pmc Negative and positive auto-regulation of BMP expression in early eye development
    Jie Huang
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Electronic address
    Dev Biol 407:256-64. 2015
    ..In summary, our results suggest that negative and positive auto-regulation of BMP expression is important to regulate early eye development. ..
  18. pmc Bmp4 from the optic vesicle specifies murine retina formation
    Jie Huang
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, USA
    Dev Biol 402:119-26. 2015
    ..Differences in the signaling pathways required for specification of the retina and retinal pigmented epithelium in chicken and mouse embryos suggest major changes in signaling during the evolution of the vertebrate eye. ..
  19. pmc HIF-1: an age-dependent regulator of lens cell proliferation
    Ying Bo Shui
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 49:4961-70. 2008
    ..A previous study showed that the hypoxic environment around the lens suppressed lens growth in older rats. The present study was conducted to investigate the mechanism responsible for the age-dependent decline in lens cell proliferation...
  20. pmc Functions of the type 1 BMP receptor Acvr1 (Alk2) in lens development: cell proliferation, terminal differentiation, and survival
    Ramya Rajagopal
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 49:4953-60. 2008
    ..Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is essential for the induction and subsequent development of the lens. The purpose of this study was to analyze the function(s) of the type 1 BMP receptor, Acvr1, in lens development...
  21. pmc Histone posttranslational modifications and cell fate determination: lens induction requires the lysine acetyltransferases CBP and p300
    Louise Wolf
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY10461, USA, Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY10461, USA, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA, Departments of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University Saint Louis, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA, Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA, Department of Surgery, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178, USA, Department of Biochemistry, St Jude Children s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA and Department of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler School of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv University, Israel 69978
    Nucleic Acids Res 41:10199-214. 2013
    ....
  22. pmc The gel state of the vitreous and ascorbate-dependent oxygen consumption: relationship to the etiology of nuclear cataracts
    Ying Bo Shui
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Arch Ophthalmol 127:475-82. 2009
    ..To investigate the rate and mechanism of oxygen consumption by the vitreous...
  23. pmc Age-dependent control of lens growth by hypoxia
    Ying Bo Shui
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 49:1023-9. 2008
    ..It has been postulated that the hypoxic environment in the eye protects the lens from nuclear cataracts. The authors sought to determine whether the Po(2) in the eye regulates lens growth...
  24. pmc Ischemic diabetic retinopathy may protect against nuclear sclerotic cataract
    Nancy M Holekamp
    Barnes Retina Institute, St Louis, MO 63144, USA
    Am J Ophthalmol 150:543-550.e1. 2010
    ..To determine whether diabetes mellitus is protective for nuclear sclerotic cataract at baseline and 6 and 12 months after vitrectomy surgery...
  25. ncbi Signaling through FGF receptor-2 is required for lens cell survival and for withdrawal from the cell cycle during lens fiber cell differentiation
    Claudia M Garcia
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Dev Dyn 233:516-27. 2005
    ..It also contributes to the normal elongation of primary lens fiber cells and to the survival of lens epithelial cells...
  26. pmc FGF signaling activates a Sox9-Sox10 pathway for the formation and branching morphogenesis of mouse ocular glands
    Ziyan Chen
    State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat Sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Development 141:2691-701. 2014
    ....
  27. pmc Enzymatic degradation identifies components responsible for the structural properties of the vitreous body
    Benjamen A Filas
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 55:55-63. 2014
    ..The purpose of this study was to measure the structural properties of the vitreous body after enzymatic degradation of selected macromolecules...
  28. pmc Intracellular mediators of transforming growth factor beta superfamily signaling localize to endosomes in chicken embryo and mouse lenses in vivo
    Ramya Rajagopal
    Dept Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, USA
    BMC Cell Biol 8:25. 2007
    ..Although there is substantial evidence linking endocytosis and growth factor signaling in cultured cells, there has been little study of the endosomal localization of signaling components in intact tissues or organs...
  29. pmc Visualizing lens epithelial cell proliferation in whole lenses
    Luke A Wiley
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Mol Vis 16:1253-9. 2010
    ..To develop a means to image cells in S-phase of the cell cycle while preserving the anatomic relationships within the lens...
  30. pmc Comparison of two probe designs for determining intraocular oxygen distribution
    Young Hoon Park
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    Br J Ophthalmol 95:118-22. 2011
    ..To resolve this discrepancy, the present study compared measurements made in vitro or in animal eyes, using the electrode employed in the previous study or a fibre-optic sensor of a different design...
  31. ncbi Importance of vitreous liquefaction in age-related cataract
    George J Harocopos
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 45:77-85. 2004
    ..Vitrectomy is associated with the rapid progression of nuclear cataracts. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that age-related liquefaction of the vitreous gel may also be associated with lens opacification...
  32. ncbi Vascular endothelial growth factor expression and signaling in the lens
    Ying Bo Shui
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 44:3911-9. 2003
    ....
  33. pmc Computational model for oxygen transport and consumption in human vitreous
    Benjamen A Filas
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 54:6549-59. 2013
    ..After validation, the model was used to estimate how age-related changes in vitreous physiology and structure alter oxygen levels at the lens...
  34. ncbi Vitrectomy surgery increases oxygen exposure to the lens: a possible mechanism for nuclear cataract formation
    Nancy M Holekamp
    Barnes Retina Institute, St Louis, Missouri, 63144, USA
    Am J Ophthalmol 139:302-10. 2005
    ..To report vitreous oxygen tension before, immediately after, and at longer times after vitrectomy...
  35. ncbi Evaluation of fibroblast growth factor signaling during lens fiber cell differentiation
    Jian xin Huang
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Cataract Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 44:680-90. 2003
    ..In the present study, the role of FGFs in fiber cell differentiation and epithelial cell proliferation in chicken embryos was examined...
  36. pmc Regional differences in actomyosin contraction shape the primary vesicles in the embryonic chicken brain
    Benjamen A Filas
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    Phys Biol 9:066007. 2012
    ..This study provides a new understanding of early brain morphogenesis...
  37. pmc Identification and expression of Hop, an atypical homeobox gene expressed late in lens fiber cell terminal differentiation
    Oleg Vasiliev
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Mol Vis 13:114-24. 2007
    ..To identify transcripts expressed late in lens fiber cell maturation that might regulate fiber cell fusion, organelle degradation, or other events associated with the maturation of lens fiber cells...
  38. ncbi Tissue growth constrained by extracellular matrix drives invagination during optic cup morphogenesis
    Alina Oltean
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1097, Saint Louis, MO, 63130 4899, USA
    Biomech Model Mechanobiol 15:1405-1421. 2016
    ..These results are consistent with our matrix-constraint hypothesis, providing new insight into the mechanics of OC (early retina) morphogenesis...
  39. doi On the Spatiotemporal Material Anisotropy of the Vitreous Body in Tension and Compression
    Nihar S Shah
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, 63110, USA
    Ann Biomed Eng 44:3084-95. 2016
    ....
  40. pmc Impact of Corneal Endothelial Dysfunctions on Intraocular Oxygen Levels in Human Eyes
    Andrew J W Huang
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, United States
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 56:6483-8. 2015
    ..We studied the implications of corneal endothelial dysfunctions on oxidative stress in the anterior segment via in vivo measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in the anterior chamber (AC) of human eyes...
  41. pmc Central corneal thickness correlates with oxygen levels in the human anterior chamber angle
    Carla J Siegfried
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri Electronic address
    Am J Ophthalmol 159:457-62.e1. 2015
    ..To measure oxygen (pO2) in eyes of patients undergoing intraocular surgery and identify correlations with central corneal thickness (CCT)...
  42. pmc Preservation of the structure of enzymatically-degraded bovine vitreous using synthetic proteoglycan mimics
    Qianru Zhang
    Eye Center, Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, United States
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 55:8153-62. 2014
    ..In this study, we tested the ability of three novel synthetic chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan mimics to preserve the structure and physical properties of enzymatically-degraded bovine vitreous...
  43. pmc Quantitative imaging of enzymatic vitreolysis-induced fiber remodeling
    Benjamen A Filas
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, United States
    Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 55:8626-37. 2014
    ..The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitative polarized light imaging (QPLI) as a tool for studying fiber organization in the vitreous and near the vitreoretinal interface in control and enzymatically perturbed conditions...
  44. pmc Loss of NF-kappaB control and repression of Prdx6 gene transcription by reactive oxygen species-driven SMAD3-mediated transforming growth factor beta signaling
    Nigar Fatma
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198, USA
    J Biol Chem 284:22758-72. 2009
  45. pmc A test of lens opacity as an indicator of preclinical Alzheimer Disease
    Ling Bei
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    Exp Eye Res 140:117-23. 2015
    ..We conclude that cataract grade or lens opacity is unlikely to provide a non-invasive measure of the risk of developing Alzheimer dementia. ..
  46. doi Photoacoustic tomography imaging and estimation of oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in ocular tissue of rabbits
    Stella N Hennen
    Solo Private Practice, Minneapolis, MN, USA Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, School of Medicine, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA Electronic address
    Exp Eye Res 138:153-8. 2015
    ..Having a safe, non-invasive method of in vivo imaging of sO2 in the anterior segment is important to studies evaluating the role of oxidative damage, hypoxia and ischemia in pathogenesis of ocular diseases. ..
  47. pmc Mechanical effects of the surface ectoderm on optic vesicle morphogenesis in the chick embryo
    Hadi S Hosseini
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, Campus Box 1097, St Louis, MO 63130, USA Department of Physics, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63130, USA
    J Biomech 47:3837-46. 2014
    ..The results of this study indicate that differential growth in the OV and external pressure exerted by the SE are sufficient to cause the global changes in OV shape observed during the earliest stages of eye development. ..
  48. pmc A potential role for differential contractility in early brain development and evolution
    Benjamen A Filas
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1097, Saint Louis, MO 63130 4899, USA
    Biomech Model Mechanobiol 11:1251-62. 2012
    ..This study is a step toward uncovering the underlying morphomechanical mechanisms that regulate how neural phenotypic differences arise between species...
  49. pmc Dosage effects of cohesin regulatory factor PDS5 on mammalian development: implications for cohesinopathies
    Bin Zhang
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    PLoS ONE 4:e5232. 2009
    ....
  50. ncbi Bone morphogenetic protein signaling and the initiation of lens fiber cell differentiation
    Teri Louise Belecky-Adams
    Department of Biology, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, SL306, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA
    Development 129:3795-802. 2002
    ..These data indicate that BMPs participate in the differentiation of lens fiber cells, along with at least one additional, and still unknown factor...
  51. pmc Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling is essential for lens fiber cell differentiation
    Haotian Zhao
    Graduate Program in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, College of Biological Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
    Dev Biol 318:276-88. 2008
    ..Therefore, while signaling by FGF receptors is essential for lens fiber differentiation, different FGF receptors function redundantly...
  52. pmc Cited2 is required for the proper formation of the hyaloid vasculature and for lens morphogenesis
    Yu Chen
    Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
    Development 135:2939-48. 2008
    ..Taken together, our study provides novel mechanistic revelation for lens morphogenesis and hyaloid vasculature formation and hence might offer new insights into the etiology of Peters' anomaly and ocular hypervascularity...
  53. ncbi The expression pattern of opticin during chicken embryogenesis
    Elena I Frolova
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555 1019, USA
    Gene Expr Patterns 4:335-8. 2004
    ..cOptc is expressed in the brain and the neural tube from stage 9 onward. At later stages, cOptc is expressed in the ciliary epithelium of the eye, optic stalk, Rathke's pouch, pharyngeal pouches, nasal pit and otic vesicle...
  54. pmc alpha-Smooth muscle actin is constitutively expressed in the lens epithelial cells of several species
    Claudia M Garcia
    Exp Eye Res 83:999-1001. 2006
  55. pmc Myopia and axial length contribute to vitreous liquefaction and nuclear cataract
    Nancy M Holekamp
    Arch Ophthalmol 126:744; author reply 744. 2008
  56. ncbi Lead exposure and cataract risk in men
    David C Beebe
    JAMA 293:1724; author reply 1724-5. 2005