Jonathan I Bloch

Summary

Affiliation: University of Florida
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Cranial anatomy of Paleogene Micromomyidae and implications for early primate evolution
    Jonathan I Bloch
    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, P O Box 117800, Gainesville, FL 32611 7800, USA Electronic address
    J Hum Evol 96:58-81. 2016
  2. ncbi request reprint Cranial anatomy of the Paleocene plesiadapiform Carpolestes simpsoni (Mammalia, Primates) using ultra high-resolution X-ray computed tomography, and the relationships of plesiadapiforms to Euprimates
    Jonathan I Bloch
    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, PO Box 117800, FL 32611 7800, USA
    J Hum Evol 50:1-35. 2006
  3. pmc New Paleocene skeletons and the relationship of plesiadapiforms to crown-clade primates
    Jonathan I Bloch
    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, P O Box 117800, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:1159-64. 2007
  4. doi request reprint First virtual endocasts of adapiform primates
    Arianna R Harrington
    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA Electronic address
    J Hum Evol 99:52-78. 2016
  5. doi request reprint First North American fossil monkey and early Miocene tropical biotic interchange
    Jonathan I Bloch
    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 7800, USA
    Nature 533:243-6. 2016
  6. pmc New partial skeletons of Palaeocene Nyctitheriidae and evaluation of proposed euarchontan affinities
    Carly L Manz
    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Department of geological sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Biol Lett 11:20140911. 2015
  7. ncbi request reprint Grasping primate origins
    Jonathan I Bloch
    Museum of Paleontology, University of Michigan, 1109 Geddes Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 1079, USA
    Science 298:1606-10. 2002
  8. doi request reprint Intrinsic hand proportions of euarchontans and other mammals: implications for the locomotor behavior of plesiadapiforms
    E Christopher Kirk
    Department of Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Hum Evol 55:278-99. 2008
  9. ncbi request reprint Affinities of 'hyopsodontids' to elephant shrews and a Holarctic origin of Afrotheria
    Shawn P Zack
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 East Monument Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Nature 434:497-501. 2005
  10. ncbi request reprint Transient floral change and rapid global warming at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary
    Scott L Wing
    Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20560, USA
    Science 310:993-6. 2005

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. doi request reprint Cranial anatomy of Paleogene Micromomyidae and implications for early primate evolution
    Jonathan I Bloch
    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, P O Box 117800, Gainesville, FL 32611 7800, USA Electronic address
    J Hum Evol 96:58-81. 2016
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint Cranial anatomy of the Paleocene plesiadapiform Carpolestes simpsoni (Mammalia, Primates) using ultra high-resolution X-ray computed tomography, and the relationships of plesiadapiforms to Euprimates
    Jonathan I Bloch
    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, PO Box 117800, FL 32611 7800, USA
    J Hum Evol 50:1-35. 2006
    ..Cladistic analysis of cranial data fails to support a close relationship of Carpolestidae to either tarsiiform euprimates or extant Dermoptera, but suggests a close relationship between Carpolestidae, Plesiadapidae, and Euprimates...
  3. pmc New Paleocene skeletons and the relationship of plesiadapiforms to crown-clade primates
    Jonathan I Bloch
    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, P O Box 117800, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:1159-64. 2007
    ..Our results are consistent with those from recent molecular analyses that group Dermoptera with Scandentia. We find no evidence to support the hypothesis that any plesiadapiforms were mitten-gliders or closely related to Dermoptera...
  4. doi request reprint First virtual endocasts of adapiform primates
    Arianna R Harrington
    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA Electronic address
    J Hum Evol 99:52-78. 2016
    ..However, structural changes evident in these endocasts suggest that early euprimates relied more on vision than olfaction relative to plesiadapiforms, despite having relatively small endocranial volumes compared to extant taxa. ..
  5. doi request reprint First North American fossil monkey and early Miocene tropical biotic interchange
    Jonathan I Bloch
    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 7800, USA
    Nature 533:243-6. 2016
    ....
  6. pmc New partial skeletons of Palaeocene Nyctitheriidae and evaluation of proposed euarchontan affinities
    Carly L Manz
    Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Department of geological sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Biol Lett 11:20140911. 2015
    ..These results suggest that similarities in postcranial morphology among nyctitheriids, adapisoriculids and euarchontans represent separate instances of convergence or primitive retention of climbing capabilities. ..
  7. ncbi request reprint Grasping primate origins
    Jonathan I Bloch
    Museum of Paleontology, University of Michigan, 1109 Geddes Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 1079, USA
    Science 298:1606-10. 2002
    ..We infer that the ancestor of Euprimates was primitively an arboreal grasper adapted for terminal branch feeding rather than a specialized leaper or visually directed predator...
  8. doi request reprint Intrinsic hand proportions of euarchontans and other mammals: implications for the locomotor behavior of plesiadapiforms
    E Christopher Kirk
    Department of Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    J Hum Evol 55:278-99. 2008
    ..These results provide additional evidence that plesiadapiforms were arboreal and support the hypothesis that Euarchonta originated in an arboreal milieu...
  9. ncbi request reprint Affinities of 'hyopsodontids' to elephant shrews and a Holarctic origin of Afrotheria
    Shawn P Zack
    Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 East Monument Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Nature 434:497-501. 2005
    ....
  10. ncbi request reprint Transient floral change and rapid global warming at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary
    Scott L Wing
    Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20560, USA
    Science 310:993-6. 2005
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Asian gliriform origin for arctostylopid mammals
    Pieter Missiaen
    Research Unit Paleontology, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S8, 9000, Ghent, Belgium
    Naturwissenschaften 93:407-11. 2006
    ..Hence, Arctostylopidae may best be grouped with Asian non-gliroid Gliriformes, which we interpret as having dispersed into North America in the Late Palaeocene...
  12. ncbi request reprint Evolution of pedal grasping in Primates
    Eric J Sargis
    Department of Anthropology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
    J Hum Evol 53:103-7. 2007
  13. ncbi request reprint Revisiting the adaptive origins of primates (again)
    Mary T Silcox
    J Hum Evol 53:321-4; discussion 325-8. 2007