Ansgar Conrad

Summary

Affiliation: Stanford University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi Psychophysiological effects of breathing instructions for stress management
    Ansgar Conrad
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback 32:89-98. 2007
  2. ncbi Muscle relaxation therapy for anxiety disorders: it works but how?
    Ansgar Conrad
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Anxiety Disord 21:243-64. 2007
  3. pmc Does improving mood in depressed patients alter factors that may affect cardiovascular disease risk?
    C Barr Taylor
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford Medical Center, 401 Quarry Rd, Room 1316, Stanford, CA 94305 5722, USA
    J Psychiatr Res 43:1246-52. 2009
  4. doi The psychophysiology of generalized anxiety disorder: 1. Pretreatment characteristics
    Ansgar Conrad
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Psychophysiology 45:366-76. 2008
  5. ncbi Psychophysiological reactions to two levels of voluntary hyperventilation in panic disorder
    Eileen Wollburg
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Anxiety Disord 22:886-98. 2008
  6. ncbi The effects of cognitive behavior therapy on depression in older patients with cardiovascular risk
    Diane Strachowski
    Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305 5722, USA
    Depress Anxiety 25:E1-10. 2008
  7. doi The psychophysiology of generalized anxiety disorder: 2. Effects of applied relaxation
    Ansgar Conrad
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Psychophysiology 45:377-88. 2008
  8. ncbi Physiological evaluation of psychological treatments for anxiety
    Eileen Wollburg
    VA Palo Alto Health Care System, 116 PAD, 3801 Miranda Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Expert Rev Neurother 7:129-41. 2007
  9. ncbi Depression and stress reactivity in metastatic breast cancer
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Psychosom Med 68:675-83. 2006
  10. ncbi Psychophysiological and cortisol responses to psychological stress in depressed and nondepressed older men and women with elevated cardiovascular disease risk
    C Barr Taylor
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5722, USA
    Psychosom Med 68:538-46. 2006

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications12

  1. ncbi Psychophysiological effects of breathing instructions for stress management
    Ansgar Conrad
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback 32:89-98. 2007
    ..To understand the results of breathing instructions for stress and anxiety management, respiration needs to be monitored physiologically...
  2. ncbi Muscle relaxation therapy for anxiety disorders: it works but how?
    Ansgar Conrad
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Anxiety Disord 21:243-64. 2007
    ..Better-designed studies will be required to identify the mechanisms of MRT and to advance clinical practice...
  3. pmc Does improving mood in depressed patients alter factors that may affect cardiovascular disease risk?
    C Barr Taylor
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford Medical Center, 401 Quarry Rd, Room 1316, Stanford, CA 94305 5722, USA
    J Psychiatr Res 43:1246-52. 2009
    ..The normal controls exhibited no change in the variables measured during the same time. A significant improvement in mood may have little impact on most traditional or atypical risk factors, cortisol or cardiophysiology...
  4. doi The psychophysiology of generalized anxiety disorder: 1. Pretreatment characteristics
    Ansgar Conrad
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Psychophysiology 45:366-76. 2008
    ..We conclude that GAD is not necessarily characterized by chronic muscle tension, and that this rationale for MRT should be reconsidered...
  5. ncbi Psychophysiological reactions to two levels of voluntary hyperventilation in panic disorder
    Eileen Wollburg
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Anxiety Disord 22:886-98. 2008
    ..In general, differences between patients and controls in response to HV were in the cognitive-language rather than in the physiological realm...
  6. ncbi The effects of cognitive behavior therapy on depression in older patients with cardiovascular risk
    Diane Strachowski
    Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305 5722, USA
    Depress Anxiety 25:E1-10. 2008
    ..CBT is an effective treatment for reducing depression and increasing positive affect in patients at risk for CVD, but the results vary by time of measurement and measurement setting...
  7. doi The psychophysiology of generalized anxiety disorder: 2. Effects of applied relaxation
    Ansgar Conrad
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, and the Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA
    Psychophysiology 45:377-88. 2008
    ..We conclude that the clinical effects of AR in improving GAD symptoms are moderate at most and cannot be attributed to reducing muscle tension or autonomic activation...
  8. ncbi Physiological evaluation of psychological treatments for anxiety
    Eileen Wollburg
    VA Palo Alto Health Care System, 116 PAD, 3801 Miranda Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
    Expert Rev Neurother 7:129-41. 2007
    ..The most convincing studies dealt with the treatment of specific phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder...
  9. ncbi Depression and stress reactivity in metastatic breast cancer
    Janine Giese-Davis
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 401 Quarry Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    Psychosom Med 68:675-83. 2006
    ..This study investigated how depression affects MBC stress reactivity, including autonomic (ANS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function...
  10. ncbi Psychophysiological and cortisol responses to psychological stress in depressed and nondepressed older men and women with elevated cardiovascular disease risk
    C Barr Taylor
    Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 5722, USA
    Psychosom Med 68:538-46. 2006
    ..The objective of this study was to compare psychophysiological and cortisol reactions to psychological stress in older depressed and nondepressed patients at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD)...
  11. pmc Circadian affective, cardiopulmonary, and cortisol variability in depressed and nondepressed individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease
    Ansgar Conrad
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
    J Psychiatr Res 42:769-77. 2008
    ..Diurnal mood variations of older individuals at risk for CVD differ from those reported for other groups and daily fluctuations in NA are not related to cardiac autonomic control in depressed individuals...
  12. pmc Sympathetic activation in broadly defined generalized anxiety disorder
    Walton T Roth
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
    J Psychiatr Res 42:205-12. 2008
    ..We conclude that broader GAD criteria include a substantial number of chronically anxious and hyperaroused patients who do not fall within standard criteria. Such patients deserve attention by clinicians and researchers...