Margaret Bendersky

Summary

Affiliation: New Jersey
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Aggression at age 5 as a function of prenatal exposure to cocaine, gender, and environmental risk
    Margaret Bendersky
    Institute for the Study of Child Development, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Jersey 08903, USA
    J Pediatr Psychol 31:71-84. 2006
  2. pmc Inhibitory motor control at five years as a function of prenatal cocaine exposure
    Margaret Bendersky
    Institute for the Study of Child Development, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
    J Dev Behav Pediatr 24:345-51. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Preadolescent health risk behavior as a function of prenatal cocaine exposure and gender
    David Bennett
    Department of Psychiatry, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    J Dev Behav Pediatr 28:467-72. 2007
  4. pmc Children's cognitive ability from 4 to 9 years old as a function of prenatal cocaine exposure, environmental risk, and maternal verbal intelligence
    David S Bennett
    Department of Psychiatry, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19144, USA
    Dev Psychol 44:919-28. 2008
  5. pmc Children's intellectual and emotional-behavioral adjustment at 4 years as a function of cocaine exposure, maternal characteristics, and environmental risk
    David S Bennett
    Department of Psychiatry, Drexel University College of Medicine, USA
    Dev Psychol 38:648-58. 2002
  6. pmc Reactivity and regulation in children prenatally exposed to cocaine
    Tracy Dennis
    Department of Psychology, Hunter College, City University of New York, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Dev Psychol 42:688-97. 2006

Detail Information

Publications6

  1. pmc Aggression at age 5 as a function of prenatal exposure to cocaine, gender, and environmental risk
    Margaret Bendersky
    Institute for the Study of Child Development, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Jersey 08903, USA
    J Pediatr Psychol 31:71-84. 2006
    ..To examine childhood aggression at age 5 in a multiple risk model that includes cocaine exposure, environmental risk, and gender as predictors...
  2. pmc Inhibitory motor control at five years as a function of prenatal cocaine exposure
    Margaret Bendersky
    Institute for the Study of Child Development, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
    J Dev Behav Pediatr 24:345-51. 2003
    ..Potential underlying mechanisms and the importance of examining cocaine exposure effects in the context of children's existing environment are discussed...
  3. ncbi request reprint Preadolescent health risk behavior as a function of prenatal cocaine exposure and gender
    David Bennett
    Department of Psychiatry, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    J Dev Behav Pediatr 28:467-72. 2007
    ..To examine the effect of prenatal cocaine exposure on health risk behaviors during preadolescence...
  4. pmc Children's cognitive ability from 4 to 9 years old as a function of prenatal cocaine exposure, environmental risk, and maternal verbal intelligence
    David S Bennett
    Department of Psychiatry, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19144, USA
    Dev Psychol 44:919-28. 2008
    ..The findings indicate that cocaine exposure continues to place children at risk for mild cognitive deficits into preadolescence. Possible mechanisms for the Exposure x Gender interaction are discussed...
  5. pmc Children's intellectual and emotional-behavioral adjustment at 4 years as a function of cocaine exposure, maternal characteristics, and environmental risk
    David S Bennett
    Department of Psychiatry, Drexel University College of Medicine, USA
    Dev Psychol 38:648-58. 2002
    ..In contrast, only maternal depressive symptoms predicted internalizing problems. These findings indicate that early exposure to substances is largely unrelated to subsequent IQ or adjustment, particularly for girls...
  6. pmc Reactivity and regulation in children prenatally exposed to cocaine
    Tracy Dennis
    Department of Psychology, Hunter College, City University of New York, New York, NY 10021, USA
    Dev Psychol 42:688-97. 2006
    ..Effect sizes were relatively small, suggesting both resilience and vulnerabilities...