Michelle L Bell

Summary

Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc A retrospective assessment of mortality from the London smog episode of 1952: the role of influenza and pollution
    Michelle L Bell
    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, W6508 A, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 112:6-8. 2004
  2. ncbi request reprint Time-series studies of particulate matter
    Michelle L Bell
    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Annu Rev Public Health 25:247-80. 2004
  3. pmc Short-term exposure to particulate matter constituents and mortality in a national study of U.S. urban communities
    Jenna R Krall
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 121:1148-53. 2013
  4. pmc Is the relation between ozone and mortality confounded by chemical components of particulate matter? Analysis of 7 components in 57 US communities
    G Brooke Anderson
    Department of Biostatistics, John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Epidemiol 176:726-32. 2012
  5. pmc Coarse particulate matter air pollution and hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases among Medicare patients
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    JAMA 299:2172-9. 2008
  6. pmc Heat-related emergency hospitalizations for respiratory diseases in the Medicare population
    G Brooke Anderson
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Respir Crit Care Med 187:1098-103. 2013
  7. pmc Emergency admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and the chemical composition of fine particle air pollution
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 117:957-63. 2009
  8. pmc Does the effect of PM10 on mortality depend on PM nickel and vanadium content? A reanalysis of the NMMAPS data
    Francesca Dominici
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21215, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 115:1701-3. 2007
  9. pmc Spatial misalignment in time series studies of air pollution and health data
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Biostatistics 11:720-40. 2010
  10. pmc Methods to calculate the heat index as an exposure metric in environmental health research
    G Brooke Anderson
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 121:1111-9. 2013

Detail Information

Publications29

  1. pmc A retrospective assessment of mortality from the London smog episode of 1952: the role of influenza and pollution
    Michelle L Bell
    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, W6508 A, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 112:6-8. 2004
    ..These results underscore the need for diligence regarding extremely high air pollution that still exists in many parts of the world...
  2. ncbi request reprint Time-series studies of particulate matter
    Michelle L Bell
    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Annu Rev Public Health 25:247-80. 2004
    ....
  3. pmc Short-term exposure to particulate matter constituents and mortality in a national study of U.S. urban communities
    Jenna R Krall
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 121:1148-53. 2013
    ..We hypothesized that associations between PM2.5 constituents and mortality would not vary spatially or seasonally if variation in chemical composition contributes to variation in estimated PM2.5 mortality effects...
  4. pmc Is the relation between ozone and mortality confounded by chemical components of particulate matter? Analysis of 7 components in 57 US communities
    G Brooke Anderson
    Department of Biostatistics, John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Epidemiol 176:726-32. 2012
    ..Previous research found that the ozone-mortality relation is not confounded by particulate matter measured by mass; this national study indicates that the relation is also robust to control for specific components of PM(2.5)...
  5. pmc Coarse particulate matter air pollution and hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases among Medicare patients
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    JAMA 299:2172-9. 2008
    ..5) have been studied extensively over the last decade. Evidence concerning the health risks of the coarse fraction of greater than 2.5 microm and 10 microm or less in aerodynamic diameter (PM10-2.5) is limited...
  6. pmc Heat-related emergency hospitalizations for respiratory diseases in the Medicare population
    G Brooke Anderson
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Am J Respir Crit Care Med 187:1098-103. 2013
    ..With climate change predictions of more frequent and more intense heat waves, it is of paramount importance to quantify the health risks related to heat, especially for the most vulnerable...
  7. pmc Emergency admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and the chemical composition of fine particle air pollution
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 117:957-63. 2009
    ..5) (particulate matter <or= 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter) as the indicator. Evidence regarding the toxicity of the chemical components of the PM(2.5) mixture is limited...
  8. pmc Does the effect of PM10 on mortality depend on PM nickel and vanadium content? A reanalysis of the NMMAPS data
    Francesca Dominici
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21215, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 115:1701-3. 2007
    ..They found that average concentrations of nickel or vanadium in PM2.5 (PM with aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm) positively modified the lag-1 day association between PM10 and all-cause mortality...
  9. pmc Spatial misalignment in time series studies of air pollution and health data
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    Biostatistics 11:720-40. 2010
    ..We apply our methods to a database containing information on hospital admissions, air pollution, and weather for 20 large urban counties in the United States...
  10. pmc Methods to calculate the heat index as an exposure metric in environmental health research
    G Brooke Anderson
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 121:1111-9. 2013
    ..However, the method of calculating heat index varies across environmental studies, which could mean that studies using different algorithms to calculate heat index may not be comparable...
  11. pmc Fine particulate air pollution and hospital admission for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases
    Francesca Dominici
    Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
    JAMA 295:1127-34. 2006
    ..5 microm in aerodynamic diameter [PM2.5]) is limited. Results from the new national monitoring network for PM2.5 make possible systematic research on health risks at national and regional scales...
  12. pmc Wildfire-specific Fine Particulate Matter and Risk of Hospital Admissions in Urban and Rural Counties
    Jia Coco Liu
    From the aSchool of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT bDepartment of Biostatistics, T H Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA cSchool of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA dDepartment of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD and eDepartment of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
    Epidemiology 28:77-85. 2017
    ..The health impacts of wildfire smoke, including fine particles (PM2.5), are not well understood and may differ from those of PM2.5 from other sources due to differences in concentrations and chemical composition...
  13. pmc Ambient PM2.5 and Risk of Hospital Admissions: Do Risks Differ for Men and Women?
    Michelle L Bell
    From the aSchool of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT bDepartment of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD and cDepartment of Biostatistics, T H Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
    Epidemiology 26:575-9. 2015
    ..While strong evidence exists for associations between fine particles (PM2.5) and health, less is known about whether associations differ by sex...
  14. pmc Ambient Coarse Particulate Matter and Hospital Admissions in the Medicare Cohort Air Pollution Study, 1999-2010
    Helen Powell
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 123:1152-8. 2015
    ..In recent years a number of studies have examined the short-term association between coarse particulate matter (PM(10-2.5)) and mortality and morbidity outcomes. These studies, however, have produced inconsistent conclusions...
  15. pmc Lights out: impact of the August 2003 power outage on mortality in New York, NY
    G Brooke Anderson
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA
    Epidemiology 23:189-93. 2012
    ..Little is known about how power outages affect health. We investigated mortality effects of the largest US blackout to date, 14-15 August 2003 in New York, NY...
  16. pmc Toward a quantitative estimate of future heat wave mortality under global climate change
    Roger D Peng
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 119:701-6. 2011
    ..The extent to which climate change will harm human health through changes in the distribution of heat waves and the sources of uncertainty in estimating these effects have not been studied extensively...
  17. ncbi request reprint Commentary: nitrogen dioxide and asthma redux
    Jonathan M Samet
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Int J Epidemiol 33:215-6. 2004
  18. pmc International expert workshop on the analysis of the economic and public health impacts of air pollution: workshop summary
    Michelle L Bell
    Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 110:1163-8. 2002
    ..Key recommendations include the need for improved communication and extended collaboration, guidance and support for researchers, advances in methods, and resource support for data collection, assessment, and research...
  19. ncbi request reprint The avoidable health effects of air pollution in three Latin American cities: Santiago, São Paulo, and Mexico City
    Michelle L Bell
    Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
    Environ Res 100:431-40. 2006
    ..This research demonstrates the health and economic burden from air pollution in Latin American urban centers and the magnitude of health benefits from control policies...
  20. pmc A meta-analysis of time-series studies of ozone and mortality with comparison to the national morbidity, mortality, and air pollution study
    Michelle L Bell
    Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
    Epidemiology 16:436-45. 2005
    ..Although many time-series studies of ozone and mortality have identified positive associations, others have yielded null or inconclusive results, making the results of these studies difficult to interpret...
  21. pmc Ancillary human health benefits of improved air quality resulting from climate change mitigation
    Michelle L Bell
    School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
    Environ Health 7:41. 2008
    ..In this paper we review the existing evidence on ancillary health benefits relating to air pollution from various GHG strategies and provide a framework for such analysis...
  22. ncbi request reprint Metrics matter: conflicting air quality rankings from different indices of air pollution
    Michelle L Bell
    School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
    J Air Waste Manag Assoc 55:97-106. 2005
    ..Use of such averages can result in different policy rankings than consideration of the full distribution of impacts...
  23. pmc Spatial and temporal variation in PM(2.5) chemical composition in the United States for health effects studies
    Michelle L Bell
    School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 115:989-95. 2007
    ..Although numerous studies have demonstrated links between particulate matter (PM) and adverse health effects, the chemical components of the PM mixture that cause injury are unknown...
  24. pmc Effect modification by community characteristics on the short-term effects of ozone exposure and mortality in 98 US communities
    Michelle L Bell
    School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511
    Am J Epidemiol 167:986-97. 2008
    ..These differences may relate to underlying health status, differences in exposure, or other factors. Results show that some segments of the population may face higher health burdens of ozone pollution...
  25. pmc A look back at the London smog of 1952 and the half century since
    Devra L Davis
    Environ Health Perspect 110:A734-5. 2002
  26. pmc Potential confounding of particulate matter on the short-term association between ozone and mortality in multisite time-series studies
    Michelle L Bell
    School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 115:1591-5. 2007
    ..A critical question regarding the association between short-term exposure to ozone and mortality is the extent to which this relationship is confounded by ambient exposure to particles...
  27. pmc Ozone and short-term mortality in 95 US urban communities, 1987-2000
    Michelle L Bell
    School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, Conn 06511, USA
    JAMA 292:2372-8. 2004
    ..Although numerous time-series studies have estimated associations between day-to-day variation in ozone levels and mortality counts, results have been inconclusive...
  28. pmc The exposure-response curve for ozone and risk of mortality and the adequacy of current ozone regulations
    Michelle L Bell
    School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, 205 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 114:532-6. 2006
    ..Interventions to further reduce O3 pollution would benefit public health, even in regions that meet current regulatory standards and guidelines...
  29. pmc Ambient air pollution and low birth weight in Connecticut and Massachusetts
    Michelle L Bell
    School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 115:1118-24. 2007
    ..Several studies have examined whether air pollution affects birth weight; however results vary and many studies were focused on Southern California or were conducted outside of the United States...