Richard P Phillips

Summary

Affiliation: Indiana University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi The mycorrhizal-associated nutrient economy: a new framework for predicting carbon-nutrient couplings in temperate forests
    Richard P Phillips
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47403, USA
    New Phytol 199:41-51. 2013
  2. doi Roots and fungi accelerate carbon and nitrogen cycling in forests exposed to elevated CO2
    Richard P Phillips
    Department of Biology, 1001 E Third St, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47403, USA
    Ecol Lett 15:1042-9. 2012
  3. doi Elevated CO2 increases root exudation from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) seedlings as an N-mediated response
    Richard P Phillips
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Tree Physiol 29:1513-23. 2009
  4. doi Enhanced root exudation induces microbial feedbacks to N cycling in a pine forest under long-term CO2 fumigation
    Richard P Phillips
    Department of Biology, 1001 East Third St, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA
    Ecol Lett 14:187-94. 2011
  5. doi Fungal communities influence root exudation rates in pine seedlings
    Ina C Meier
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA
    FEMS Microbiol Ecol 83:585-95. 2013
  6. ncbi Towards a rhizo-centric view of plant-microbial feedbacks under elevated atmospheric CO2
    Richard P Phillips
    Department of Biology, Box 90340, Duke University, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    New Phytol 173:664-7. 2007
  7. doi Resource stoichiometry and the biogeochemical consequences of nitrogen deposition in a mixed deciduous forest
    Meghan G Midgley
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Jordan Hall, 1001 E Third Street, Bloomington, Indiana, 47405, USA
    Ecology 97:3369-3378. 2016
  8. doi Dynamics of stem water uptake among isohydric and anisohydric species experiencing a severe drought
    Koong Yi
    School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University Bloomington, 1315 East Tenth Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Tree Physiol . 2017
  9. doi Mycorrhizal type determines the magnitude and direction of root-induced changes in decomposition in a temperate forest
    Edward R Brzostek
    Department of Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA
    New Phytol 206:1274-82. 2015
  10. doi The rhizosphere and hyphosphere differ in their impacts on carbon and nitrogen cycling in forests exposed to elevated CO₂
    Ina C Meier
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA
    New Phytol 205:1164-74. 2015

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications11

  1. doi The mycorrhizal-associated nutrient economy: a new framework for predicting carbon-nutrient couplings in temperate forests
    Richard P Phillips
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47403, USA
    New Phytol 199:41-51. 2013
    ....
  2. doi Roots and fungi accelerate carbon and nitrogen cycling in forests exposed to elevated CO2
    Richard P Phillips
    Department of Biology, 1001 E Third St, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47403, USA
    Ecol Lett 15:1042-9. 2012
    ....
  3. doi Elevated CO2 increases root exudation from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) seedlings as an N-mediated response
    Richard P Phillips
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Tree Physiol 29:1513-23. 2009
    ....
  4. doi Enhanced root exudation induces microbial feedbacks to N cycling in a pine forest under long-term CO2 fumigation
    Richard P Phillips
    Department of Biology, 1001 East Third St, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA
    Ecol Lett 14:187-94. 2011
    ..To the extent that increases in exudation also stimulate SOM decomposition, such changes may prevent soil C accumulation in forest ecosystems...
  5. doi Fungal communities influence root exudation rates in pine seedlings
    Ina C Meier
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA
    FEMS Microbiol Ecol 83:585-95. 2013
    ..mutualistic fungi are likely to mediate fluxes of labile C in forest soils, with consequences for soil biogeochemistry and ecosystem processes...
  6. ncbi Towards a rhizo-centric view of plant-microbial feedbacks under elevated atmospheric CO2
    Richard P Phillips
    Department of Biology, Box 90340, Duke University, Durham, NC 27705, USA
    New Phytol 173:664-7. 2007
  7. doi Resource stoichiometry and the biogeochemical consequences of nitrogen deposition in a mixed deciduous forest
    Meghan G Midgley
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Jordan Hall, 1001 E Third Street, Bloomington, Indiana, 47405, USA
    Ecology 97:3369-3378. 2016
    ..Hence, the biogeochemical consequences of N deposition in temperate forests may be driven by the stoichiometry of the dominant trees and their associated microbes...
  8. doi Dynamics of stem water uptake among isohydric and anisohydric species experiencing a severe drought
    Koong Yi
    School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University Bloomington, 1315 East Tenth Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Tree Physiol . 2017
    ....
  9. doi Mycorrhizal type determines the magnitude and direction of root-induced changes in decomposition in a temperate forest
    Edward R Brzostek
    Department of Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA
    New Phytol 206:1274-82. 2015
    ..Our findings indicate that root-induced changes in soil processes depend on forest composition, and that shifts in the distribution of AM and ECM trees owing to climate change may determine soil C gains and losses...
  10. doi The rhizosphere and hyphosphere differ in their impacts on carbon and nitrogen cycling in forests exposed to elevated CO₂
    Ina C Meier
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA
    New Phytol 205:1164-74. 2015
    ..Collectively, our results suggest that root exudates may contribute more to accelerated N cycling under elevated CO₂ at this site, while mycorrhizal fungi may contribute more to soil C degradation...
  11. doi Positive feedbacks to growth of an invasive grass through alteration of nitrogen cycling
    Marissa R Lee
    Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
    Oecologia 170:457-65. 2012
    ..Collectively, our results demonstrate that persistence of invasive plants can be promoted by positive feedbacks with soil resources but that the magnitude of feedbacks may depend on interspecific interactions...