U Mende

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Effect of deletion of the major brain G-protein alpha subunit (alpha(o)) on coordination of G-protein subunits and on adenylyl cyclase activity
    U Mende
    Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    J Neurosci Res 54:263-72. 1998
  2. ncbi request reprint Signal transduction in atria and ventricles of mice with transient cardiac expression of activated G protein alpha(q)
    U Mende
    Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Circ Res 85:1085-91. 1999
  3. pmc Transient cardiac expression of constitutively active Galphaq leads to hypertrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy by calcineurin-dependent and independent pathways
    U Mende
    Cardiovascular Division, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 95:13893-8. 1998
  4. ncbi request reprint Dilated cardiomyopathy in two transgenic mouse lines expressing activated G protein alpha(q): lack of correlation between phospholipase C activation and the phenotype
    U Mende
    Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Divison, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    J Mol Cell Cardiol 33:1477-91. 2001
  5. ncbi request reprint Altered regulation of potassium and calcium channels by GABA(B) and adenosine receptors in hippocampal neurons from mice lacking Galpha(o)
    G J Greif
    Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    J Neurophysiol 83:1010-8. 2000

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications5

  1. ncbi request reprint Effect of deletion of the major brain G-protein alpha subunit (alpha(o)) on coordination of G-protein subunits and on adenylyl cyclase activity
    U Mende
    Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    J Neurosci Res 54:263-72. 1998
    ..We propose that alpha(o) and its associated betagamma are sequestered in a distinct pool of membranes that does not contribute to the regulation of adenylyl cyclase...
  2. ncbi request reprint Signal transduction in atria and ventricles of mice with transient cardiac expression of activated G protein alpha(q)
    U Mende
    Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Circ Res 85:1085-91. 1999
    ..It is likely that such changes occur in other model systems in which the activity of a single signaling component is increased, either due to an activating mutation or due to overexpression of the wild type...
  3. pmc Transient cardiac expression of constitutively active Galphaq leads to hypertrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy by calcineurin-dependent and independent pathways
    U Mende
    Cardiovascular Division, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 95:13893-8. 1998
    ..Treating HAalpha*q mice with CsA diminished some, but not all, aspects of the hypertrophic phenotype, suggesting that multiple pathways are involved...
  4. ncbi request reprint Dilated cardiomyopathy in two transgenic mouse lines expressing activated G protein alpha(q): lack of correlation between phospholipase C activation and the phenotype
    U Mende
    Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Divison, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    J Mol Cell Cardiol 33:1477-91. 2001
    ..The markedly different ages of disease onset in these two mouse lines provide a model for studying both genetic modifying factors and potential environmental influences in DCM...
  5. ncbi request reprint Altered regulation of potassium and calcium channels by GABA(B) and adenosine receptors in hippocampal neurons from mice lacking Galpha(o)
    G J Greif
    Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    J Neurophysiol 83:1010-8. 2000
    ..A likely possibility is that the very abundant Galpha(o) is normally used but, when absent, can readily be replaced by G proteins with different properties...