Hugues Aschard

Summary

Affiliation: Harvard University
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Evidence for large-scale gene-by-smoking interaction effects on pulmonary function
    Hugues Aschard
    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA
    Int J Epidemiol . 2017
  2. pmc Leveraging local ancestry to detect gene-gene interactions in genome-wide data
    Hugues Aschard
    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA
    BMC Genet 16:124. 2015
  3. pmc Adjusting for heritable covariates can bias effect estimates in genome-wide association studies
    Hugues Aschard
    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA Electronic address
    Am J Hum Genet 96:329-39. 2015
  4. pmc Maximizing the power of principal-component analysis of correlated phenotypes in genome-wide association studies
    Hugues Aschard
    Program in Genetic Epidemiology and Statistical Genetics, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA Electronic address
    Am J Hum Genet 94:662-76. 2014
  5. pmc A nonparametric test to detect quantitative trait loci where the phenotypic distribution differs by genotypes
    Hugues Aschard
    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Genet Epidemiol 37:323-33. 2013
  6. pmc Challenges and opportunities in genome-wide environmental interaction (GWEI) studies
    Hugues Aschard
    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA
    Hum Genet 131:1591-613. 2012
  7. pmc Combining effects from rare and common genetic variants in an exome-wide association study of sequence data
    Hugues Aschard
    1Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    BMC Proc 5:S44. 2011
  8. pmc Inclusion of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions unlikely to dramatically improve risk prediction for complex diseases
    Hugues Aschard
    Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Am J Hum Genet 90:962-72. 2012
  9. pmc Age at natural menopause genetic risk score in relation to age at natural menopause and primary open-angle glaucoma in a US-based sample
    Louis R Pasquale
    1Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 2Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital 3Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 4Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics 5Institute of Computational Biology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 6Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 7Department of Ophthalmology 8Department of Medicine, Duke University, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 9Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 10Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 11Center for Human Genetics, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, WI 12Department of Ophthalmology, UPMC Eye Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 13Departments of Ophthalmology and Anatomy Cell Biology, University of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City, IO 14Department of Ophthalmology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 15Department of Ophthalmology, WVU Eye Institute, Morgantown, WV 16Scripps Genome Center, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, CA 17Emmes Corporation, Chevy Chase
    Menopause . 2016
  10. pmc Variation in predictive ability of common genetic variants by established strata: the example of breast cancer and age
    Hugues Aschard
    From the aProgram in Genetic Epidemiology and Statistical Genetics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA bDepartment of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA and cDepartment of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
    Epidemiology 26:51-8. 2015

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications13

  1. doi request reprint Evidence for large-scale gene-by-smoking interaction effects on pulmonary function
    Hugues Aschard
    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA
    Int J Epidemiol . 2017
    ..The aim of the present study was to assess, using a genetic risk score approach, whether the effect of these 26 loci on pulmonary function is influenced by smoking...
  2. pmc Leveraging local ancestry to detect gene-gene interactions in genome-wide data
    Hugues Aschard
    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA
    BMC Genet 16:124. 2015
    ..In this work we explore the use of local ancestry in recently admixed individuals to find signals of gene-gene interaction on human traits and diseases...
  3. pmc Adjusting for heritable covariates can bias effect estimates in genome-wide association studies
    Hugues Aschard
    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA Electronic address
    Am J Hum Genet 96:329-39. 2015
    ..Using both theory and simulations, we explore this phenomenon in detail and discuss the ramifications for future genome-wide association studies of correlated traits and diseases. ..
  4. pmc Maximizing the power of principal-component analysis of correlated phenotypes in genome-wide association studies
    Hugues Aschard
    Program in Genetic Epidemiology and Statistical Genetics, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA Electronic address
    Am J Hum Genet 94:662-76. 2014
    ..Finally, we apply the proposed PCA strategy to the genome-wide association study of five correlated coagulation traits where we identify two candidate SNPs that were not found by the standard approach. ..
  5. pmc A nonparametric test to detect quantitative trait loci where the phenotypic distribution differs by genotypes
    Hugues Aschard
    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Genet Epidemiol 37:323-33. 2013
    ..We demonstrate the potential utility of our method on real data by analyzing mammographic density genome-wide data from the Nurses' Health Study...
  6. pmc Challenges and opportunities in genome-wide environmental interaction (GWEI) studies
    Hugues Aschard
    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA
    Hum Genet 131:1591-613. 2012
    ....
  7. pmc Combining effects from rare and common genetic variants in an exome-wide association study of sequence data
    Hugues Aschard
    1Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    BMC Proc 5:S44. 2011
    ....
  8. pmc Inclusion of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions unlikely to dramatically improve risk prediction for complex diseases
    Hugues Aschard
    Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Am J Hum Genet 90:962-72. 2012
    ..We show that the inclusion of G-G and G-E interaction effects in risk-prediction models is unlikely to dramatically improve the discrimination ability of these models...
  9. pmc Age at natural menopause genetic risk score in relation to age at natural menopause and primary open-angle glaucoma in a US-based sample
    Louis R Pasquale
    1Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 2Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital 3Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 4Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics 5Institute of Computational Biology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 6Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 7Department of Ophthalmology 8Department of Medicine, Duke University, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 9Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 10Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 11Center for Human Genetics, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, WI 12Department of Ophthalmology, UPMC Eye Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 13Departments of Ophthalmology and Anatomy Cell Biology, University of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City, IO 14Department of Ophthalmology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 15Department of Ophthalmology, WVU Eye Institute, Morgantown, WV 16Scripps Genome Center, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, CA 17Emmes Corporation, Chevy Chase
    Menopause . 2016
    ..We assembled 18 previously reported common genetic variants that predict ANM to determine their association with ANM or POAG...
  10. pmc Variation in predictive ability of common genetic variants by established strata: the example of breast cancer and age
    Hugues Aschard
    From the aProgram in Genetic Epidemiology and Statistical Genetics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA bDepartment of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA and cDepartment of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
    Epidemiology 26:51-8. 2015
    ..However, the clinical utility of common breast cancer risk markers may nonetheless differ across strata defined by known risk factors, such as age...
  11. pmc Genetic modifiers of menopausal hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk: a genome-wide interaction study
    Anja Rudolph
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center DKFZ, Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, D 69120 Heidelberg, Germany PMV Research Group at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Foundation for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care IQWIG, Cologne, Germany Human Genetics, Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK INSERM National Institute of Health and Medical Research, CESP Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, Villejuif, France Unité Mixte de Recherche Scientifique UMRS 1018, University Paris Sud, Villejuif, France Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance, Institute of the Ruhr Universität Bochum IPA, Bochum, Germany Institute for Occupational Medicine and Maritime Medicine, University Medical Center, Hamburg Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany Department of Internal Medicine, Telos Pharmaceuticals LLC
    Endocr Relat Cancer 20:875-87. 2013
    ..These findings warrant replication in independent studies...
  12. pmc Genome-wide meta-analysis of joint tests for genetic and gene-environment interaction effects
    Hugues Aschard
    Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA haschard hsph harvard edu
    Hum Hered 70:292-300. 2010
    ..There is growing interest in the study of gene-environment interactions in the context of genome-wide association studies (GWASs). These studies will likely require meta-analytic approaches to have sufficient power...
  13. pmc Exploring genome-wide - dietary heme iron intake interactions and the risk of type 2 diabetes
    Louis R Pasquale
    Department of Medicine, Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women s Hospital, Harvard Medical School Boston, MA, USA Glaucoma Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Boston, MA, USA
    Front Genet 4:7. 2013
    ..Several studies conclude that higher dietary heme iron intake increases the risk of T2D. Therefore we assessed whether the relation between genetic loci and T2D is modified by dietary heme iron intake...