Julia Kubanek

Summary

Affiliation: Georgia Institute of Technology
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Chemical ecology of marine plankton
    Emily R Schwartz
    School of Biology, Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center, Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 0230, USA
    Nat Prod Rep 33:843-60. 2016
  2. doi request reprint Reception of Aversive Taste
    Blair E Lunceford
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center, Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    Integr Comp Biol 55:507-17. 2015
  3. doi request reprint Chemical ecology of the marine plankton
    Jessie S Roy
    School of Biology, Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center and Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 0230, USA
    Nat Prod Rep 30:1364-79. 2013
  4. pmc High content live cell imaging for the discovery of new antimalarial marine natural products
    Serena Cervantes
    Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 12:1. 2012
  5. pmc Antineoplastic diterpene-benzoate macrolides from the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus
    Julia Kubanek
    School of Biology and School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA
    Org Lett 7:5261-4. 2005
  6. pmc Bromophycolides C-I from the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus
    Julia Kubanek
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA
    J Nat Prod 69:731-5. 2006
  7. ncbi request reprint Chemical ecology of the marine plankton
    R Drew Sieg
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 0230, USA
    Nat Prod Rep 28:388-99. 2011
  8. pmc Bioactive bromophycolides R-U from the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus
    An Shen Lin
    School of Biology and School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA
    J Nat Prod 73:275-8. 2010
  9. pmc Antibacterial neurymenolides from the Fijian red alga Neurymenia fraxinifolia
    E Paige Stout
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, 30332, USA
    Org Lett 11:225-8. 2009
  10. pmc Seaweed allelopathy against coral: surface distribution of a seaweed secondary metabolite by imaging mass spectrometry
    Tiffany D Andras
    School of Biology and Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    J Chem Ecol 38:1203-14. 2012

Collaborators

  • Mark E Hay
  • Terry W Snell
  • Nael A McCarty
  • Emily K Prince
  • Mark R Viant
  • John D Parker
  • Kristin E Gribble
  • David B Mark Welch
  • Johannes Leisen
  • Alistair D M Dove
  • Patricia A Sobecky
  • Cynthia E Kicklighter
  • Deron E Burkepile
  • James J La Clair
  • C David Sherrill
  • Robert J French
  • E Paige Stout
  • Amy L Lane
  • William Aalbersberg
  • Craig R Fairchild
  • Jacques Prudhomme
  • Karine Le Roch
  • Sebastian Engel
  • R Drew Sieg
  • An Shen Lin
  • Kelsey L Poulson-Ellestad
  • Douglas B Rasher
  • Tonya L Shearer
  • Facundo M Fernandez
  • Scott G Franzblau
  • Ren Wang Jiang
  • Leonard Nyadong
  • Todd Barsby
  • Emily R Schwartz
  • Blair E Lunceford
  • Remington X Poulin
  • Anne C Prusak
  • Jessie S Roy
  • David J Snare
  • Tiffany D Andras
  • Troy S Alexander
  • Margaret E Teasdale
  • Serena Cervantes
  • May D Wang
  • R Mitchell Parry
  • Clare H Redshaw
  • Staci P Cohen
  • Christopher H Thompson
  • Hanns Hatt
  • Staci A Padove Cohen
  • Ejae A John
  • Nazia Mojib
  • Jessie Roy
  • Brook L Nunn
  • Christina M Jones
  • Allison M Fields
  • Manuel Torres
  • Young Tae-Chang
  • David Carter
  • Michael Cervantes
  • Matthew Bruton
  • Paige E Stout
  • Karine G Le Roch
  • Asiri Gahlena
  • Benjamin A Smith
  • Gwyneth E Halstead-Nussloch
  • Karen F Bernard
  • Denise Sutter
  • Karla K V Haack
  • Tracey L Myers
  • Jerome Naar
  • Cody S Freeman
  • Asiri S Galhena
  • Edward G Hohenstein
  • Asiri Galhena
  • Mark Kwasnik
  • Pedro R Olivetti
  • Adam P Hasemeyer
  • Matthew D Fuller
  • Jan Pohl
  • Theresa M Davenport
  • Denis McMaster
  • Lauren Mylacraine
  • Kenneth I Hardcastle
  • Elizabeth P Stout
  • Kenneth Hardcastle
  • Jennifer O'Neal
  • Pamela Pollet
  • Leslie Gelbaum
  • M Cameron Sullards

Detail Information

Publications42

  1. doi request reprint Chemical ecology of marine plankton
    Emily R Schwartz
    School of Biology, Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center, Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 0230, USA
    Nat Prod Rep 33:843-60. 2016
    ....
  2. doi request reprint Reception of Aversive Taste
    Blair E Lunceford
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center, Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    Integr Comp Biol 55:507-17. 2015
    ..Comparing the molecular mechanisms and ecological consequences of aversive-taste reception among organisms in a variety of types of ecosystems and ecological niches will illuminate the role of taste in ecology and evolution. ..
  3. doi request reprint Chemical ecology of the marine plankton
    Jessie S Roy
    School of Biology, Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center and Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 0230, USA
    Nat Prod Rep 30:1364-79. 2013
    ....
  4. pmc High content live cell imaging for the discovery of new antimalarial marine natural products
    Serena Cervantes
    Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
    BMC Infect Dis 12:1. 2012
    ..Here we used our newly developed live cell-imaging platform to discover novel marine natural products and their cellular phenotypic effects against the most lethal malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum...
  5. pmc Antineoplastic diterpene-benzoate macrolides from the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus
    Julia Kubanek
    School of Biology and School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA
    Org Lett 7:5261-4. 2005
    ..This represents the first discovery of natural products incorporating a diterpene and benzoate skeleton into a macrolide system...
  6. pmc Bromophycolides C-I from the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus
    Julia Kubanek
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA
    J Nat Prod 69:731-5. 2006
    ..Bromophycolides C-I (1-7) displayed modest antineoplastic activity against a range of human tumor cell lines...
  7. ncbi request reprint Chemical ecology of the marine plankton
    R Drew Sieg
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 0230, USA
    Nat Prod Rep 28:388-99. 2011
    ..Covering: January 2009 to September 2010 inclusive...
  8. pmc Bioactive bromophycolides R-U from the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus
    An Shen Lin
    School of Biology and School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA
    J Nat Prod 73:275-8. 2010
    ..Bromophycolide S (2) also showed submicromolar activity against the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum...
  9. pmc Antibacterial neurymenolides from the Fijian red alga Neurymenia fraxinifolia
    E Paige Stout
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, 30332, USA
    Org Lett 11:225-8. 2009
    ..Neurymenolide A (1) displayed moderately potent activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF)...
  10. pmc Seaweed allelopathy against coral: surface distribution of a seaweed secondary metabolite by imaging mass spectrometry
    Tiffany D Andras
    School of Biology and Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    J Chem Ecol 38:1203-14. 2012
    ..neurymenioides, and we found the molecule on all surfaces analyzed, with highest concentrations on basal portions of blades...
  11. pmc Antimalarial bromophycolides J-Q from the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus
    Amy L Lane
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA
    J Org Chem 74:2736-42. 2009
    ..Among these 18 bromophycolides, several exhibited activities in the low micromolar range against the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum...
  12. pmc Structures and absolute configurations of sulfate-conjugated triterpenoids including an antifungal chemical defense of the green macroalga Tydemania expeditionis
    Ren Wang Jiang
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA
    J Nat Prod 71:1616-9. 2008
    ..Comparison of the biological activities of natural products with their desulfated derivatives indicated that sulfation does not appear to confer cytotoxicity or antifungal activity...
  13. pmc Antineoplastic unsaturated fatty acids from Fijian macroalgae
    Ren Wang Jiang
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    Phytochemistry 69:2495-500. 2008
    ..3 to 14.4 microM. The similar cell selectivity patterns of these three compounds suggest that they might act by a common, but unknown, mechanism of action...
  14. pmc Unusual antimalarial meroditerpenes from tropical red macroalgae
    E Paige Stout
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    Bioorg Med Chem Lett 20:5662-5. 2010
    ..By oxidizing 5 to the corresponding δ-tocopherylquinone (6), antimalarial activity against the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum was increased by more than 20-fold...
  15. pmc Macroalgal terpenes function as allelopathic agents against reef corals
    Douglas B Rasher
    Schools of Biology and Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 108:17726-31. 2011
    ..Our results highlight a newly demonstrated but potentially widespread competitive mechanism to help explain the lack of coral recovery on many present-day reefs...
  16. pmc Bromophycoic acids: bioactive natural products from a Fijian red alga Callophycus sp
    Margaret E Teasdale
    School of Biology, Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center, Institute of Bioengineering and Biosciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA
    J Org Chem 77:8000-6. 2012
    ..These compounds display a range of activities against human tumor cell lines, malarial parasites, and bacterial pathogens including low micromolar suppression of MRSA and VREF...
  17. pmc Identification of RL-TGR, a coreceptor involved in aversive chemical signaling
    Staci P Cohen
    Department of Pediatrics, Emory University and Children s Healthcare of Atlanta Center for Cystic Fibrosis Research, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:12339-44. 2010
    ..RL-TGR forms a coreceptor that responds to a chemical defense compound in the marine environment, and its discovery might lead the way to the identification of other receptors that mediate chemical defense signaling...
  18. ncbi request reprint Chemically mediated competition between microbes and animals: microbes as consumers in food webs
    Deron E Burkepile
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 310 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA
    Ecology 87:2821-31. 2006
    ....
  19. pmc Structure and biological evaluation of novel cytotoxic sterol glycosides from the marine red alga Peyssonnelia sp
    An Shen Lin
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, 30332, USA
    Bioorg Med Chem 18:8264-9. 2010
    ....
  20. pmc Callophycoic acids and callophycols from the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus
    Amy L Lane
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    J Org Chem 72:7343-51. 2007
    ..Compounds 1-10 exhibited antibacterial, antimalarial, and anticancer activity, although they are less bioactive than diterpene-benzoate macrolides previously isolated from this red alga...
  21. pmc Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry reveals surface-mediated antifungal chemical defense of a tropical seaweed
    Amy L Lane
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:7314-9. 2009
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Isolation and structure elucidation of feeding deterrent diterpenoids from the sea pansy, Renilla reniformis
    Todd Barsby
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 0230, USA
    J Nat Prod 68:511-6. 2005
    ..Renillins A (1) and B (2) were found to possess an oxygenation pattern without precedent in this skeletal class...
  23. pmc Conservation of progesterone hormone function in invertebrate reproduction
    E Paige Stout
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:11859-64. 2010
    ....
  24. pmc Marine and terrestrial herbivores display convergent chemical ecology despite 400 million years of independent evolution
    Douglas B Rasher
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112:12110-5. 2015
    ..Such striking parallels indicate that specialist herbivores in marine and terrestrial systems can evolve convergent ecological strategies despite 400 million years of independent evolution in vastly different habitats. ..
  25. pmc Lifespan extension of rotifers by treatment with red algal extracts
    David J Snare
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center, Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, United States
    Exp Gerontol 48:1420-7. 2013
    ..An understanding of how these natural products interact with their molecular targets could lead to selective and effective treatments for slowing aging and reducing age related diseases. ..
  26. doi request reprint Chemical ecology of marine angiosperms: opportunities at the interface of marine and terrestrial systems
    R Drew Sieg
    School of Biology and Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 0230, USA
    J Chem Ecol 39:687-711. 2013
    ..Throughout this review, we point to areas for future study, highlighting opportunities for new directions in chemical ecology that will advance our understanding of ecological interactions in these valuable ecosystems...
  27. ncbi request reprint Structure-activity relationship of chemical defenses from the freshwater plant Micranthemum umbrosum
    Amy L Lane
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 0400, USA
    Phytochemistry 67:1224-31. 2006
    ..Disruption of the lactone moiety of 2 reduced its deterrence. Finally, feeding assays testing effects of 1 and 2 at multiple concentrations established that these two natural products interact additively in deterring crayfish feeding...
  28. pmc Competing phytoplankton undermines allelopathy of a bloom-forming dinoflagellate
    Emily K Prince
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 0230, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 275:2733-41. 2008
    ..Our results suggest that competitors differ in their responses to phytoplankton allelopathy, with S. costatum exhibiting a previously undescribed method of resistance that may influence community structure and alter bloom dynamics...
  29. pmc Reactive desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) of natural products of a marine alga
    Leonard Nyadong
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    Anal Bioanal Chem 394:245-54. 2009
    ..Optimized DESI protocols allowed the direct and unambiguous detection of bromophycolides, including A, B, and E, from the surface of untreated algal tissue...
  30. ncbi request reprint Chemical defenses promote persistence of the aquatic plant Micranthemum umbrosum
    John D Parker
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 0230, USA
    J Chem Ecol 32:815-33. 2006
    ..umbrosum, suggesting that plant defenses play critical yet understudied roles in the structure of freshwater plant communities...
  31. ncbi request reprint Regioselective syntheses of 2,3,4-tribromopyrrole and 2,3,5-tribromopyrrole
    Ejae A John
    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 0400, USA
    J Nat Prod 67:1929-31. 2004
    ..Spectral data for 2 differed from synthetic and natural 1...
  32. ncbi request reprint Defensive 2-alkylpyrrole sulfamates from the marine annelid Cirriformia tentaculata
    Todd Barsby
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 0230, USA
    J Nat Prod 66:1110-2. 2003
    ..The structures were elucidated by the interpretation of spectral data obtained on inseparable mixtures of the unstable compounds. This suite of metabolites deterred feeding by the generalist predatory fish Thalassoma bifasciatum...
  33. pmc Metabolomics and proteomics reveal impacts of chemically mediated competition on marine plankton
    Kelsey L Poulson-Ellestad
    School of Biology, Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 Institute of Bioengineering and Biosciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111:9009-14. 2014
    ....
  34. pmc Biomarkers of whale shark health: a metabolomic approach
    Alistair D M Dove
    Georgia Aquarium Research Center, Georgia Aquarium, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    PLoS ONE 7:e49379. 2012
    ..Overall, NMR and MS provided complementary data that showed that metabolomics is a useful approach for biomarker prospecting in poorly studied species like elasmobranchs...
  35. doi request reprint Tracking losses of brevetoxins on exposure to phytoplankton competitors: Mechanistic insights
    Clare H Redshaw
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, 30332 0230, USA
    Aquat Toxicol 100:365-72. 2010
    ..These findings support the concept of potentially using competitor phytoplankton species or compounds derived from phytoplankton as biocontrol agents for waterborne toxins associated with red tide...
  36. ncbi request reprint Prevalence of chemical defenses among freshwater plants
    Anne C Prusak
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 0230, USA
    J Chem Ecol 31:1145-60. 2005
    ..However, we found no relationship between soluble protein concentration and deterrence of plant extracts...
  37. pmc Genetic determinants of mate recognition in Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera)
    Terry W Snell
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 0230, USA
    BMC Biol 7:60. 2009
    ....
  38. pmc Isolation and characterization of a high affinity peptide inhibitor of ClC-2 chloride channels
    Christopher H Thompson
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA
    J Biol Chem 284:26051-62. 2009
    ..GaTx2 is the first peptide toxin inhibitor of any ClC protein. The high affinity and specificity displayed by this toxin will make it a very powerful pharmacological tool to probe ClC-2 structure/function...
  39. ncbi request reprint Fitness consequences for copepods feeding on a red tide dinoflagellate: deciphering the effects of nutritional value, toxicity, and feeding behavior
    Emily K Prince
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, 30332 0230, USA
    Oecologia 147:479-88. 2006
    ..Our results indicate that K. brevis is a poor food for A. tonsa, probably due to nutritional inadequacy rather than toxicity, which could affect bloom dynamics in the Gulf of Mexico where these species co-occur...
  40. ncbi request reprint Community and ecosystem level consequences of chemical cues in the plankton
    Mark E Hay
    School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta 30332 0230, USA
    J Chem Ecol 28:2001-16. 2002
    ..The possible role of DMS in global heat budgets expands this effect even further. The ecosystem-wide and potentially global consequences of aquatic chemical cues is an underappreciated topic that warrants additional attention...
  41. doi request reprint Reconstitution of a chemical defense signaling pathway in a heterologous system
    Staci A Padove Cohen
    Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA
    J Exp Biol 211:599-605. 2008
    ..This bioassay has the potential to lead to the identification of genes that encode receptors capable of interacting with deterrent chemicals, which would enable understanding of predator detection of chemical defenses...
  42. pmc Seaweed resistance to microbial attack: a targeted chemical defense against marine fungi
    Julia Kubanek
    Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, The Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA 92037 0204, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:6916-21. 2003
    ....