K J Weinhold

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. pmc Standardization of cytokine flow cytometry assays
    Holden T Maecker
    BD Biosciences, San Jose, USA
    BMC Immunol 6:13. 2005
  2. pmc Polychromatic immunophenotypic characterization of T cell profiles among HIV-infected patients experiencing immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS)
    David M Murdoch
    Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    AIDS Res Ther 6:16. 2009
  3. ncbi request reprint Immunologic and virologic analyses of an acutely HIV type 1-infected patient with extremely rapid disease progression
    J F Demarest
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 2926, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 17:1333-44. 2001
  4. ncbi request reprint Cellular anti-GP120 cytolytic reactivities in HIV-1 seropositive individuals
    K J Weinhold
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
    Lancet 1:902-5. 1988
  5. ncbi request reprint HIV-1 GP120-mediated immune suppression and lymphocyte destruction in the absence of viral infection
    K J Weinhold
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710
    J Immunol 142:3091-7. 1989
  6. ncbi request reprint Effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy and thymic transplantation on immunoreconstitution in HIV infection
    M L Markert
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 16:403-13. 2000
  7. ncbi request reprint Immunologic profile of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients during viral remission and relapse on antiretroviral therapy
    M F Wellons
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Infect Dis 183:1522-5. 2001
  8. ncbi request reprint Anti-GP 120 antibodies from HIV seropositive individuals mediate broadly reactive anti-HIV ADCC
    H K Lyerly
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 3:409-22. 1987
  9. ncbi request reprint HIV vaccine development at Duke University Medical Center
    B F Haynes
    Department of Medicine, The Duke Center for Aids Research, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Immunol Res 22:263-9. 2000
  10. pmc Analysis of the adult thymus in reconstitution of T lymphocytes in HIV-1 infection
    B F Haynes
    Department of Medicine, Duke Center for AIDS Research, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Clin Invest 103:453-60. 1999

Research Grants

  1. Conference on HIV Vaccines
    Kent Weinhold; Fiscal Year: 2005
  2. CENTRAL LABORATORY FOR THE HIV VACCINES TRAILS NETWORK
    Kent Weinhold; Fiscal Year: 2005

Detail Information

Publications34

  1. pmc Standardization of cytokine flow cytometry assays
    Holden T Maecker
    BD Biosciences, San Jose, USA
    BMC Immunol 6:13. 2005
    ....
  2. pmc Polychromatic immunophenotypic characterization of T cell profiles among HIV-infected patients experiencing immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS)
    David M Murdoch
    Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    AIDS Res Ther 6:16. 2009
    ..CONCLUSION: CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subset maturational phenotypes were heterogeneous among IRIS cases and controls. However, IRIS cases demonstrated significant increases in activation of CD8+ T cell effector subpopulations...
  3. ncbi request reprint Immunologic and virologic analyses of an acutely HIV type 1-infected patient with extremely rapid disease progression
    J F Demarest
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 2926, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 17:1333-44. 2001
    ..The absence of demonstrable anti-HIV CTL reactivities, coupled with a protracted course of seroconversion, highlights the importance of robust HIV-specific immune responses in the control of disease progression...
  4. ncbi request reprint Cellular anti-GP120 cytolytic reactivities in HIV-1 seropositive individuals
    K J Weinhold
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
    Lancet 1:902-5. 1988
    ....
  5. ncbi request reprint HIV-1 GP120-mediated immune suppression and lymphocyte destruction in the absence of viral infection
    K J Weinhold
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710
    J Immunol 142:3091-7. 1989
    ....
  6. ncbi request reprint Effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy and thymic transplantation on immunoreconstitution in HIV infection
    M L Markert
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 16:403-13. 2000
    ..There was no clear difference in restoration of T cell function in the transplant recipients compared with the controls. Increases in TRECs after initiation of HAART may correlate with improved immune function...
  7. ncbi request reprint Immunologic profile of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients during viral remission and relapse on antiretroviral therapy
    M F Wellons
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Infect Dis 183:1522-5. 2001
    ..By multivariable regression analyses, CD8(+) and CD4(+) lymphocyte activation were associated significantly with increasing plasma HIV RNA levels...
  8. ncbi request reprint Anti-GP 120 antibodies from HIV seropositive individuals mediate broadly reactive anti-HIV ADCC
    H K Lyerly
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 3:409-22. 1987
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint HIV vaccine development at Duke University Medical Center
    B F Haynes
    Department of Medicine, The Duke Center for Aids Research, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Immunol Res 22:263-9. 2000
    ..This brief review summarizes ongoing work at the Duke University School of Medicine on HIV vaccine development...
  10. pmc Analysis of the adult thymus in reconstitution of T lymphocytes in HIV-1 infection
    B F Haynes
    Department of Medicine, Duke Center for AIDS Research, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Clin Invest 103:453-60. 1999
    ..Thymectomy before HIV-1 infection did not preclude either peripheral CD4(+) T-cell rises or clinical responses after antiretroviral therapy...
  11. ncbi request reprint Thymopoiesis in HIV-infected adults after highly active antiretroviral therapy
    M L Markert
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 17:1635-43. 2001
    ..Thymopoiesis in adult AIDS patients may contribute to immune reconstitution even after prolonged CD4+ T lymphopenia...
  12. ncbi request reprint Identification of highly conserved and broadly cross-reactive HIV type 1 cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes as candidate immunogens for inclusion in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vectored HIV vaccines
    G Ferrari
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 2770, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 16:1433-43. 2000
    ..Meanwhile, extensive parallel studies in populations infected with non-clade B HIV-1 subtypes should define the patterns of immunodominant epitopes and HLA for comparison with the data already collected in clade B-infected subjects...
  13. pmc In vivo gp41 antibodies targeting the 2F5 monoclonal antibody epitope mediate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 neutralization breadth
    Xiaoying Shen
    Duke Human Vaccine Institute, Duke University Medicine Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Virol 83:3617-25. 2009
    ..Our findings suggest that multiple events (i.e., genetic predisposition and HIV-1 immune dysregulation) may be required for induction of broadly reactive gp41 MPER antibodies in natural infection...
  14. ncbi request reprint CD8 CTL responses in vaccines: emerging patterns of HLA restriction and epitope recognition
    G Ferrari
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, P O Box 2926, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Immunol Lett 79:37-45. 2001
    ..Although the majority of CTL responses were directed against novel epitopes, these effectors were still able to mediate cross-clade reactivities...
  15. pmc Phenotypic and functional profile of HIV-inhibitory CD8 T cells elicited by natural infection and heterologous prime/boost vaccination
    Stephanie A Freel
    Duke University Human Vaccine Institute, Departments of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Virol 84:4998-5006. 2010
    ..Our data define attributes of an antiviral CD8(+) T-cell response that may be optimized in the search for an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine...
  16. ncbi request reprint Cytokine augmentation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120-specific cellular cytotoxicity
    K C Stine
    Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
    J Biol Response Mod 8:501-10. 1989
    ..We found that interferon-gamma alone had no effect on gp120 cellular reactivity; however, the combination of interferon-gamma plus IL-2 produced enhancement beyond that of IL-2 alone...
  17. pmc Polyfunctional cytomegalovirus-specific immunity in lung transplant recipients receiving valganciclovir prophylaxis
    L D Snyder
    Department of Medicine Department of Surgery and Immunology Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, NC
    Am J Transplant 11:553-60. 2011
    ..Thus, valganciclovir prophylaxis does not appear to impair the development of CMV-specific immunity in lung transplantation...
  18. pmc Initial B-cell responses to transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1: virion-binding immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies followed by plasma anti-gp41 antibodies with ineffective control of initial viremia
    Georgia D Tomaras
    Duke Human Vaccine Institute, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Virol 82:12449-63. 2008
    ..These results demonstrate that the first IgM and IgG antibodies induced by transmitted HIV-1 are capable of binding virions but have little impact on acute-phase viremia at the timing and magnitude that they occur in natural infection...
  19. ncbi request reprint Longitudinal assessment of immune response and viral characteristics in HIV-infected patients with prolonged CD4(+)/viral load discordance
    Susan S Kaplan
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 22710, USA
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 21:13-6. 2005
    ..Thus, CD4(+)/VL discordance can be maintained for periods exceeding 5 years in some patients receiving PI-based HAART without significant evolution of HIV resistance...
  20. ncbi request reprint Demographic factors that influence the neutralizing antibody response in recipients of recombinant HIV-1 gp120 vaccines
    David C Montefiori
    Department of Surgery, Laboratory for AIDS Vaccine Research and Development, Duke University Medical Center, PO Box 2926, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Infect Dis 190:1962-9. 2004
    ..These data indicate that race may affect the neutralizing antibody response to some gp120 immunogens. To fully evaluate immunogenicity, clinical trials of candidate vaccines should enroll diverse populations of subjects...
  21. ncbi request reprint HLA-A and -B allele expression and ability to develop anti-Gag cross-clade responses in subtype C HIV-1-infected Ethiopians
    Guido Ferrari
    Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    Hum Immunol 65:648-59. 2004
    ..These data represent the first report of correlating HLA phenotype and HIV-specific cell-mediated immune responses among infected Ethiopians and may be useful in designing cytotoxic T lymphocyte-inducing vaccines for this part of Africa...
  22. pmc Optimization of a highly standardized carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester flow cytometry panel and gating strategy design using discriminative information measure evaluation
    Cliburn Chan
    Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Cytometry A 77:1126-36. 2010
    ..An illustrative example of the application of DIME to streamline the gating strategy for a highly standardized carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) assay is described...
  23. ncbi request reprint Absence of immunodominant anti-Gag p17 (SL9) responses among Gag CTL-positive, HIV-uninfected vaccine recipients expressing the HLA-A*0201 allele
    Guido Ferrari
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Immunol 173:2126-33. 2004
    ....
  24. pmc Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 antibodies that mask membrane proximal region epitopes: antibody binding kinetics, induction, and potential for regulation in acute infection
    S Munir Alam
    Human Vaccine Institute, Box 3258, Duke University Medical Center, MSRBII Bldg, Room 4042, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Virol 82:115-25. 2008
    ....
  25. pmc HIV-1 gp41 envelope IgA is frequently elicited after transmission but has an initial short response half-life
    N L Yates
    Duke Human Vaccine Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA
    Mucosal Immunol 6:692-703. 2013
    ..HIV-1 transmission frequently elicits mucosal HIV-1 envelope-specific IgA responses targeted to gp41 that have a short half-life...
  26. ncbi request reprint CD3 delta and epsilon gene expression in CD3-CD16+ natural killer cell clones derived from thymic precursors
    D DeNofrio
    Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    Hum Immunol 43:283-94. 1995
    ..The signaling events regulating the expression of the CD3 invariant chain genes within immature lymphoid progenitor cells may be important in determining their eventual maturation into T-cell and NK-cell lineages in vivo...
  27. pmc Induction of plasma (TRAIL), TNFR-2, Fas ligand, and plasma microparticles after human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission: implications for HIV-1 vaccine design
    Nancy Gasper-Smith
    Duke Human Vaccine Institute, Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA
    J Virol 82:7700-10. 2008
    ....
  28. ncbi request reprint Cellular immune response to viral peptides in patients exposed to HIV
    P M Ahearne
    Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710
    AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 4:259-67. 1988
    ..Last, the major HIV-1 structure component p24 was found to be the most consistent T cell activation antigen among the panel tested...
  29. ncbi request reprint Prolonged CD4+ cell/virus load discordance during treatment with protease inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy: immune response and viral control
    Susan A Sufka
    Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    J Infect Dis 187:1027-37. 2003
    ..These findings suggest that discordant responses may be related to enhanced HIV-directed immune responses, diminished cellular activation, decreased viral replication capacity, and preservation of non-syncytium-inducing virus strains...
  30. pmc Characterization of functional and phenotypic changes in anti-Gag vaccine-induced T cell responses and their role in protection after HIV-1 infection
    Michael R Betts
    Laboratory of Immunology, Human Immunology Section, Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 40 Convent Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:4512-7. 2005
    ..These data suggest that control of HIV by vaccine-elicited HIV-specific T cell responses may be difficult, even when the T cell response has those characteristics predicted to provide optimal protection...
  31. pmc Phase 2 study of an HIV-1 canarypox vaccine (vCP1452) alone and in combination with rgp120: negative results fail to trigger a phase 3 correlates trial
    Nina D Russell
    Program in Infectious Diseases, Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA
    J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 44:203-12. 2007
    ..We conducted a phase 2 trial to determine if a canarypox vaccine candidate (vCP1452) administered with rgp120 subunit protein would "qualify" for a trial to define a correlate of efficacy...
  32. ncbi request reprint Comparison of systemic and mucosal delivery of 2 canarypox virus vaccines expressing either HIV-1 genes or the gene for rabies virus G protein
    Peter F Wright
    Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA
    J Infect Dis 189:1221-31. 2004
    ....
  33. ncbi request reprint Safety and immunogenicity of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte poly-epitope, DNA plasmid (EP HIV-1090) vaccine in healthy, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-uninfected adults
    Geoffrey J Gorse
    Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Saint Louis University, St Louis, MO 63104, United States
    Vaccine 26:215-23. 2008
    ..Three vaccine recipients raised anti-HIV-1 CD8+ CTL measured by chromium-release assay. The vaccine was safe and well-tolerated, but only weakly immunogenic...
  34. ncbi request reprint Phase 1 clinical trials of the National Institutes of Health Vaccine Research Center HIV/AIDS candidate vaccines
    Harriet L Robinson
    J Infect Dis 194:1625-7. 2006

Research Grants2

  1. Conference on HIV Vaccines
    Kent Weinhold; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ....
  2. CENTRAL LABORATORY FOR THE HIV VACCINES TRAILS NETWORK
    Kent Weinhold; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..The CL includes administrative, organizational and management structures that ensure effective communication within the laboratory network as well as between the CL and various functional units of the HVTN. ..