Sonke Johnsen

Summary

Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Polarization vision seldom increases the sighting distance of silvery fish
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA Electronic address
    Curr Biol 26:R752-4. 2016
  2. doi request reprint How to measure color using spectrometers and calibrated photographs
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 219:772-8. 2016
  3. pmc The giant eyes of giant squid are indeed unexpectedly large, but not if used for spotting sperm whales
    Dan E Nilsson
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund 22362, Sweden
    BMC Evol Biol 13:187. 2013
  4. doi request reprint Hide and seek in the open sea: pelagic camouflage and visual countermeasures
    Sonke Johnsen
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 email
    Ann Rev Mar Sci 6:369-92. 2014
  5. doi request reprint Light and vision in the deep-sea benthos: I. Bioluminescence at 500-1000 m depth in the Bahamian islands
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 215:3335-43. 2012
  6. ncbi request reprint Hidden in plain sight: the ecology and physiology of organismal transparency
    S Johnsen
    Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA
    Biol Bull 201:301-18. 2001
  7. pmc Polarization sensitivity as a contrast enhancer in pelagic predators: lessons from in situ polarization imaging of transparent zooplankton
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:655-70. 2011
  8. ncbi request reprint Light-dependent magnetoreception: quantum catches and opponency mechanisms of possible photosensitive molecules
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:3171-8. 2007
  9. ncbi request reprint Propagation and perception of bioluminescence: factors affecting counterillumination as a cryptic strategy
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Biol Bull 207:1-16. 2004
  10. pmc Cryptic and conspicuous coloration in the pelagic environment
    Sonke Johnsen
    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 1049, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 269:243-56. 2002

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications29

  1. doi request reprint Polarization vision seldom increases the sighting distance of silvery fish
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA Electronic address
    Curr Biol 26:R752-4. 2016
    ..e. brightness) vision is lacking. Here we show, using in situ polarization imagery and a new visual detection model, that polarization vision does not in fact appear to allow viewers to see silvery fish at greater distances. ..
  2. doi request reprint How to measure color using spectrometers and calibrated photographs
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 219:772-8. 2016
    ..It focuses in particular on the inherent ambiguities of many optical measurements, and how these can be addressed. ..
  3. pmc The giant eyes of giant squid are indeed unexpectedly large, but not if used for spotting sperm whales
    Dan E Nilsson
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund 22362, Sweden
    BMC Evol Biol 13:187. 2013
    ....
  4. doi request reprint Hide and seek in the open sea: pelagic camouflage and visual countermeasures
    Sonke Johnsen
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 email
    Ann Rev Mar Sci 6:369-92. 2014
    ..A theme throughout is that far more is known about the structures of the optical and visual systems involved than about their function, an imbalance that is due primarily to the rarity of observations of undisturbed behavior...
  5. doi request reprint Light and vision in the deep-sea benthos: I. Bioluminescence at 500-1000 m depth in the Bahamian islands
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 215:3335-43. 2012
    ..In situ observations suggested that bioluminescence associated with these sites was due primarily to light emitted by bioluminescent planktonic species as they struck filter feeders that extended into the water column...
  6. ncbi request reprint Hidden in plain sight: the ecology and physiology of organismal transparency
    S Johnsen
    Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA
    Biol Bull 201:301-18. 2001
    ....
  7. pmc Polarization sensitivity as a contrast enhancer in pelagic predators: lessons from in situ polarization imaging of transparent zooplankton
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 366:655-70. 2011
    ..We show that relatively simple algorithms can use this negative polarization contrast to increase visibility substantially...
  8. ncbi request reprint Light-dependent magnetoreception: quantum catches and opponency mechanisms of possible photosensitive molecules
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 210:3171-8. 2007
    ..Experiments under these conditions are needed to draw further conclusions...
  9. ncbi request reprint Propagation and perception of bioluminescence: factors affecting counterillumination as a cryptic strategy
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Biol Bull 207:1-16. 2004
    ..This research has implications for the study of spatial resolution, contrast sensitivity, and color discrimination in deep-sea visual systems...
  10. pmc Cryptic and conspicuous coloration in the pelagic environment
    Sonke Johnsen
    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 1049, USA
    Proc Biol Sci 269:243-56. 2002
    ..The contrast of maximally conspicuous objects viewed from short distances was greatest at wavelengths displaced from the wavelength of maximum light penetration...
  11. ncbi request reprint Crepuscular and nocturnal illumination and its effects on color perception by the nocturnal hawkmoth Deilephila elpenor
    Sonke Johnsen
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:789-800. 2006
    ..Given this, color vision may be more common in crepuscular and nocturnal species than previously considered...
  12. ncbi request reprint The physics and neurobiology of magnetoreception
    Sonke Johnsen
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 6:703-12. 2005
    ..Despite recent advances, however, magnetoreceptors have not been identified with certainty in any animal, and the mode of transduction for the magnetic sense remains unknown...
  13. doi request reprint The male blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, uses both chromatic and achromatic cues during mate choice
    Jamie Baldwin
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 215:1184-91. 2012
    ..Our results are unusual in that they indicate that male mate choice in the blue crab is not guided solely by achromatic or chromatic mechanisms, suggesting that both color and intensity are used to evaluate female claw color...
  14. doi request reprint Pheromones exert top-down effects on visual recognition in the jumping spider Lyssomanes viridis
    Cynthia Tedore
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 216:1744-56. 2013
    ....
  15. doi request reprint Visual acuity in pelagic fishes and mollusks
    Yakir L Gagnon
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA Electronic address
    Vision Res 92:1-9. 2013
    ..The increase in acuity with depth allows the predators to focus all the available light bioluminescent prey animals emit and detect their next meal...
  16. doi request reprint Spectral sensitivity of the concave mirror eyes of scallops: potential influences of habitat, self-screening and longitudinal chromatic aberration
    Daniel I Speiser
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 214:422-31. 2011
    ..Scallop distal retinas may be sensitive to longer wavelengths of light than scallop proximal retinas to correct for either self-screening by the retinas or longitudinal chromatic aberration of the lens...
  17. doi request reprint Effects of molting on the visual acuity of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus
    Jamie Baldwin
    Department of Biology, Box 90338, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 214:3055-61. 2011
    ..The results described here may be broadly applicable to all arthropods that molt and have particular importance for crustaceans that molt multiple times in their lifetime or have mating cycles that are paired with molting...
  18. pmc Evolution of graded refractive index in squid lenses
    Alison M Sweeney
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J R Soc Interface 4:685-98. 2007
    ..Our work elucidates the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying the production and maintenance of camera-like optics in squid lenses...
  19. doi request reprint Mesopelagic cephalopods switch between transparency and pigmentation to optimize camouflage in the deep
    Sarah Zylinski
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Curr Biol 21:1937-41. 2011
    ..This is consistent with a dynamic strategy to optimize camouflage under ambient and searchlight conditions...
  20. ncbi request reprint Spatial vision in the echinoid genus Echinometra
    Erin Blevins
    Biology Department, Box 90338, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 207:4249-53. 2004
    ..This first demonstration of spatial vision in an echinoderm sheds further light on the complex optical structures and photobehaviors found in this phylum...
  21. doi request reprint The importance of color in mate choice of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus
    Jamie Baldwin
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
    J Exp Biol 212:3762-8. 2009
    ..This strongly suggests that male blue crabs made their choices based on the hue of the red claws, further suggesting that blue crabs are capable of color vision and use color in mate choice...
  22. ncbi request reprint Polarization sensitivity in the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii enhances the detection of moving transparent objects
    John C Tuthill
    Biology Department, Swarthmore College, PA 19081, USA
    J Exp Biol 209:1612-6. 2006
    ..Because escape responses are generally more reliably induced than other behaviors, the method employed in this study may prove useful for examining sensory capabilities in other species...
  23. ncbi request reprint Insect communication: Polarized light as a butterfly mating signal
    Alison Sweeney
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708, USA
    Nature 423:31-2. 2003
  24. ncbi request reprint Comparative visual acuity of coleoid cephalopods
    Alison M Sweeney
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institution, Moss Landing, CA, USA
    Integr Comp Biol 47:808-14. 2007
    ..In general, squid have optical capabilities comparable to other organisms generally assumed to have good vision, such as fish and birds. Surprisingly, the optical capability of the eye of Vampyroteuthis infernalis rivals that of humans...
  25. doi request reprint A chiton uses aragonite lenses to form images
    Daniel I Speiser
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Curr Biol 21:665-70. 2011
    ..We propose that one of the two refractive indices of the birefringent chiton lens places a focused image on the retina in air, whereas the other does so in water...
  26. doi request reprint Disentangling the visual cues used by a jumping spider to locate its microhabitat
    Cynthia Tedore
    Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 219:2396-401. 2016
    ..This calls for a careful re-examination of which visual cues a variety of arthropods are actually attending to when they search for their preferred host species or microhabitat. ..
  27. doi request reprint Spectral sensitivity, spatial resolution and temporal resolution and their implications for conspecific signalling in cleaner shrimp
    Eleanor M Caves
    Department of Biology, Box 90338, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 219:597-608. 2016
    ....
  28. doi request reprint Scallops visually respond to the size and speed of virtual particles
    Daniel I Speiser
    Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    J Exp Biol 211:2066-70. 2008
    ..Because scallops must open their anterior mantle gapes to feed, our findings suggest that these animals may visually detect the size and speed of moving particles and use this information to help identify favorable feeding conditions...
  29. doi request reprint Weaponry, color, and contest success in the jumping spider Lyssomanes viridis
    Cynthia Tedore
    Duke University, Biology, Durham, NC 27708, United States
    Behav Processes 89:203-11. 2012
    ..We conclude that male chelicerae and forelegs are under strong positive selection for their use in physical fights and/or as visual signals of fighting ability...