Leonard H Sigal

Summary

Affiliation: Bristol-Myers Squibb
Country: USA

Publications

  1. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 31: CD molecules of relevance to immunity, inflammation, and rheumatologic syndromes
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 10:278-83. 2004
  2. ncbi Molecular biology and immunology for clinicians 29: lipid domains, lipid rafts, and caveolae
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 10:143-6. 2004
  3. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 34: Interleukins of current clinical relevance (part II)
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute Bristol Myers Squibb, J 3100, PO Box 4000, Princeton, NJ 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 11:34-9. 2005
  4. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 32: T-cells with regulatory function
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 11:286-9. 2005
  5. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 35: CD1, invariant NKT (iNKT) Cells, and gammadelta T-cells
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 11:336-9. 2005
  6. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 36: protecting against autoimmunity: tolerance and aire, the immunologic shadow, and other mechanisms of negative selection in the thymus
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 12:44-6. 2006
  7. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 37: Protecting against autoimmunity-tolerance: mechanisms of negative selection in the thymus
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, J 3100, PO Box 4000, Princeton, NJ 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 12:99-101. 2006
  8. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 38: B cells, factories, and immunomodulators
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 12:152-7. 2006
  9. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 39: NF-kappaB-function, activation, control, and consequences
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 12:207-11. 2006
  10. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 40: ubiquitin, programmed protein degradation, and the proteasome
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Pribceton, New Jersey 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 12:255-8. 2006

Detail Information

Publications46

  1. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 31: CD molecules of relevance to immunity, inflammation, and rheumatologic syndromes
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 10:278-83. 2004
    ..For those of you with the fortitude to follow this series, see how far you (and all of science) have come!..
  2. ncbi Molecular biology and immunology for clinicians 29: lipid domains, lipid rafts, and caveolae
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 10:143-6. 2004
    ..Yet again, an insight in one discrete field of cell biology is proving to be of great relevance in a host of other areas of study...
  3. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 34: Interleukins of current clinical relevance (part II)
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute Bristol Myers Squibb, J 3100, PO Box 4000, Princeton, NJ 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 11:34-9. 2005
    ....
  4. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 32: T-cells with regulatory function
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 11:286-9. 2005
    ..T-reg demand our attention as we try to manipulate the molecular biology of immune responses and inflammation to control autoimmune disorders and enhance transplantation efficiency...
  5. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 35: CD1, invariant NKT (iNKT) Cells, and gammadelta T-cells
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 11:336-9. 2005
    ....
  6. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 36: protecting against autoimmunity: tolerance and aire, the immunologic shadow, and other mechanisms of negative selection in the thymus
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 12:44-6. 2006
    ..The absence of aire leads to autoimmune polyendocrinopathy, proof that aire is the center of an amazing "filtering" system. These and other molecular mechanisms underlying tolerance are explored in this and the next paper in this series...
  7. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 37: Protecting against autoimmunity-tolerance: mechanisms of negative selection in the thymus
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, J 3100, PO Box 4000, Princeton, NJ 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 12:99-101. 2006
    ....
  8. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 38: B cells, factories, and immunomodulators
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 12:152-7. 2006
    ....
  9. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 39: NF-kappaB-function, activation, control, and consequences
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 12:207-11. 2006
    ....
  10. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 40: ubiquitin, programmed protein degradation, and the proteasome
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Pribceton, New Jersey 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 12:255-8. 2006
    ..The complexity of these processes is being used for therapy in oncology now and perhaps in immunology and rheumatology in the near future...
  11. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 44: atherosclerosis: an immunologically mediated (autoimmune?) disease
    Leonard H Sigal
    Research and Development, Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 13:160-8. 2007
    ..A true understanding of this seems to have required a most circuitous route-sometimes you have to leave for a long journey before you can return and really see home for the first time...
  12. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 43: the mitogen-activated protein kinase family in inflammatory signaling
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 13:96-9. 2007
    ..The human "kinome" (the various families of kinases) is very complex; we will limit ourselves in this discussion to the mitogen-activated protein kinases...
  13. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 30: The immunologic synapse
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute Bristol Myers Squibb, J 3100, PO Box 4000, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 11:234-9. 2005
    ..Appreciation of the intricacies of the synapse also identifies targets that one day may be used to interfere with antigen-specific immune responses, eg, autoimmunity...
  14. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 27: Toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerization domains
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 11:176-9. 2005
    ..The inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis may be magnified, if not initiated, by these innate mechanisms as well...
  15. doi Basic science for the clinician 49: expanding the description of the RNA universe
    Leonard H Sigal
    Immunology, Global Development and Medical Affairs, Research and Development, Bristol Myers Squibb, New Jersey, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 15:90-4. 2009
    ..If, in fact, the bio-universe was initially determined by RNA, not DNA, there may be new RNAs with unexpected mechanisms and consequences...
  16. ncbi Basic Science for the clinician 41: tails of cytokine receptor activation and control: JAKs, STATs, PIASs, and SOCSs
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 12:315-9. 2006
    ....
  17. doi Basic science for the clinician 48: tyrosine kinases in disease: the potential for inhibitors in the treatment of immunologic diseases
    Leonard H Sigal
    Research and Development Bristol Myers Squibb, J 3100, PO Box 4000, Princeton, NJ 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 14:45-8. 2008
    ..This is another example of "Better living (and curing!) through chemistry" that we as clinicians need to master to render optimal care...
  18. ncbi Commentary: 'What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.' Shakespeare W. Romeo and Juliet, II, ii(47-48)
    Leonard H Sigal
    Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
    Int J Epidemiol 34:1345-7. 2005
  19. doi Basic science for the clinician 47[corrected]: Fcgamma receptors
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 13:355-8. 2007
    ..This report focused on the various FcgammaR, the receptors for IgG...
  20. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 46. Molecular biologic agents in development: possible clinical consequences to rheumatologists
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 13:286-90. 2007
    ..Small molecules will not be reviewed, the emphasis here being on antibodies and larger molecules, cytokines among them...
  21. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 45: CD4+ T-cell subsets of probable clinical consequence
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 13:229-33. 2007
    ..Although previous articles in this series discussed some of these subsets, I thought expanding on what is known about another recently described subset and putting them all together in one review might be helpful...
  22. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 26: Tolerance--mechanisms and manifestations
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute Bristol Myers Squibb, J 3100, PO Box 4000, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 11:113-7. 2005
    ..Although the concept of oral tolerance is nearing its centennial, there is still much to learn!..
  23. ncbi Basic science for the clinician 42: handling the corpses: apoptosis, necrosis, nucleosomes and (quite possibly) the immunopathogenesis of SLE
    Leonard H Sigal
    Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ 08543 4000, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 13:44-8. 2007
    ..This article reviews some aspects of this theory and some of the molecular biologic features of necrosis, apoptosis, and other forms of cell death...
  24. doi Role of psychiatric comorbidity in chronic Lyme disease
    Afton L Hassett
    University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 0019, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 59:1742-9. 2008
    ..To evaluate the prevalence and role of psychiatric comorbidity and other psychological factors in patients with chronic Lyme disease (CLD)...
  25. pmc Psychiatric comorbidity and other psychological factors in patients with "chronic Lyme disease"
    Afton L Hassett
    Division of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Research, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 0019, USA
    Am J Med 122:843-50. 2009
    ..burgdorferi. The objective of this study was to assess the medical and psychiatric status of such patients and compare these findings to those from patients without CMI...
  26. doi The relationship between affect balance style and clinical outcomes in fibromyalgia
    Afton L Hassett
    Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Division of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Research, New Brunswick, NJ 80903 0019, USA
    Arthritis Rheum 59:833-40. 2008
    ..Affect balance styles and their relationship to clinical outcomes were compared between patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and controls...
  27. doi Basic science for the clinician 59: polymorphonuclear cells: mechanisms in human defense and in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease
    Leonard H Sigal
    Division of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Research, Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 18:443-9. 2012
    ..Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are often underappreciated as drivers of inflammatory diseases, which is why I think it is time for us to turn our attention to this underappreciated component of the immune response...
  28. pmc Contributions of societal and geographical environments to "chronic Lyme disease": the psychopathogenesis and aporology of a new "medically unexplained symptoms" syndrome
    Leonard H Sigal
    Division of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Research, Department of Medicine, Lyme Disease Center, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 0019, USA
    Environ Health Perspect 110:607-11. 2002
    ....
  29. doi Musculoskeletal features of Lyme disease: understanding the pathogenesis of clinical findings helps make appropriate therapeutic choices
    Leonard H Sigal
    Division of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Research, Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 001, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 17:256-65. 2011
    ..On the other hand, a positive result from certain unvalidated laboratories or novel assays proves nothing and should not be viewed as substantiating the diagnosis...
  30. ncbi Lyme arthritis synovial gammadelta T cells instruct dendritic cells via fas ligand
    Cheryl Collins
    Immunobiology Program, Department of Medicine, The University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT 50405, USA
    J Immunol 175:5656-65. 2005
    ..They also underscore the view that as levels of c-FLIP increase, Fas signaling can be diverted from induction of apoptosis to pathways leading to cell effector function...
  31. ncbi Unforeseen consequences of terrorism: medically unexplained symptoms in a time of fear
    Afton L Hassett
    Departments of Medicine, Family Medicine, and Psychiatry, Division of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Research, UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, One Robert Wood Johnson Place, MEB 484, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
    Arch Intern Med 162:1809-13. 2002
  32. doi Basic science for the clinician 54: CD5
    Leonard H Sigal
    Division of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Research, Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 18:83-8. 2012
    ..New findings put old claims to rest and open up new avenues for research, both basic and clinical, with therapeutic applications not far behind...
  33. doi Basic science for the clinician 53: mast cells
    Leonard H Sigal
    Division of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Research, Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 001, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 17:395-400. 2011
    ..Thus, better insights into mast cell functions and mast cell-derived effector molecules should command our attention as we move forward in better understanding disease immunopathogenesis and directed intelligent therapeutics development...
  34. ncbi A pilot study of the efficacy of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback in patients with fibromyalgia
    Afton L Hassett
    Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School UMDNJ RWJMS, P O Box 19, MEB 484, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
    Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback 32:1-10. 2007
    ..An open label trial of biofeedback training was conducted to manipulate suboptimal heart rate variability (HRV), a key marker of autonomic dysfunction...
  35. doi Basic science for the clinician 57: transforming growth factor β
    Leonard H Sigal
    Division of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Research, Departments of Medicine, Pediatrics, and Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 18:268-72. 2012
    ..So "what is in a name?" A rose by any other name would smell as sweet and would still be immunologically active, even if the name is "misleading."..
  36. doi Basic science for the clinician 56: inducible T-cell costimulator--the world of costimulation gets more complicated…and interesting
    Leonard H Sigal
    Division of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Research, Departments of Medicine, Pediatrics, and Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 18:212-6. 2012
    ..There are similarities and differences, interactions, and overlaps between the 2 pathways, some of which are very useful in understanding the immunopathogenesis of immune diseases...
  37. doi Basic science for the clinician 55: CTLA-4
    Leonard H Sigal
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Y Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 1 RW Johnson Pl, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 001, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 18:155-8. 2012
    ..A future article in this series will describe inducible T-cell costimulator, which is a normal by-pass to CTLA-4's effects...
  38. ncbi Reactive arthritis
    Danielle Lauren Petersel
    Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, MEB484, PO Box 19, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 0019, USA
    Infect Dis Clin North Am 19:863-83. 2005
    ..Diagnosis usually can be made by clinical examination and history. The current standard therapy is NSAIDs and physiotherapy, but molecular biologic treatment may ultimately become the mainstay in recalcitrant and severe ReA...
  39. doi Basic Science for the Clinician 52: adipokines
    Leonard H Sigal
    Division of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Research, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
    J Clin Rheumatol 17:157-61. 2011
    ....
  40. pmc Effects of external qigong therapy on osteoarthritis of the knee. A randomized controlled trial
    Kevin W Chen
    UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ, USA
    Clin Rheumatol 27:1497-505. 2008
    ..Further study on a larger scale with multiple EQT healers is necessary to determine the role (if any) of EQT in the treatment of OA and to identify differences in EQT techniques...
  41. ncbi Vaccination for Lyme disease: cost-effectiveness versus cost and value
    Leonard H Sigal
    Arthritis Rheum 46:1439-42. 2002
  42. ncbi High expression of Fas ligand by synovial fluid-derived gamma delta T cells in Lyme arthritis
    Karen Roessner
    Department of Medicine Immunobiology, The University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
    J Immunol 170:2702-10. 2003
    ..In this capacity, certain gamma delta T cell subsets may serve as cytolytic sentinels at sites of inflammation, and perhaps at epithelial barriers...
  43. ncbi Misconceptions about Lyme disease: confusions hiding behind ill-chosen terminology
    Leonard H Sigal
    UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
    Ann Intern Med 136:413-9. 2002
  44. ncbi Herbal medications commonly used in the practice of rheumatology: mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects
    Arathi R Setty
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Boston, USA
    Semin Arthritis Rheum 34:773-84. 2005
    ..To review the literature on herbal preparations commonly utilized in the treatment of rheumatic indications...
  45. ncbi Toward a more complete appreciation of the clinical spectrum of Borrelia burgdorferi infection: early Lyme disease without erythema migrans
    Leonard H Sigal
    Am J Med 114:74-5. 2003
  46. doi Abatacept in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled withdrawal trial
    Nicolino Ruperto
    IRCCS G Gaslini, PRINTO, Genoa, Italy
    Lancet 372:383-91. 2008
    ..We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of abatacept, a selective T-cell costimulation modulator, in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis who had failed previous treatments...