Helinor J Johnston

Summary

Affiliation: Veterinary Laboratories Agency
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi A critical review of the biological mechanisms underlying the in vivo and in vitro toxicity of carbon nanotubes: The contribution of physico-chemical characteristics
    Helinor J Johnston
    Centre for Nano Safety, School of Life Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, UK
    Nanotoxicology 4:207-46. 2010
  2. pmc Identification of the mechanisms that drive the toxicity of TiO(2 )particulates: the contribution of physicochemical characteristics
    Helinor J Johnston
    Centre for Nano Safety, School of Life Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh EH10 5DT, UK
    Part Fibre Toxicol 6:33. 2009
  3. doi The biological mechanisms and physicochemical characteristics responsible for driving fullerene toxicity
    Helinor J Johnston
    Centre for Nano Safety, School of Life Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh EH10 5DT, UK
    Toxicol Sci 114:162-82. 2010
  4. doi A review of the in vivo and in vitro toxicity of silver and gold particulates: particle attributes and biological mechanisms responsible for the observed toxicity
    Helinor J Johnston
    Centre for Nano Safety, School of Life Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, UK
    Crit Rev Toxicol 40:328-46. 2010
  5. doi Evaluating the uptake and intracellular fate of polystyrene nanoparticles by primary and hepatocyte cell lines in vitro
    Helinor J Johnston
    Biomedicine and Sport and Exercise Science Research Group, School of Life Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh EH10 5DT, UK
    Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 242:66-78. 2010
  6. doi Exploring the cellular and tissue uptake of nanomaterials in a range of biological samples using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy
    Helinor J Johnston
    Nano Safety Research Group, School of Life Sciences, Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, UK
    Nanotechnology 26:505102. 2015
  7. doi Approaches to Develop Alternative Testing Strategies to Inform Human Health Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials
    Vicki Stone
    School of Life Sciences, Nano Safety Research Group, Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh, UK
    Risk Anal 36:1538-50. 2016

Detail Information

Publications7

  1. doi A critical review of the biological mechanisms underlying the in vivo and in vitro toxicity of carbon nanotubes: The contribution of physico-chemical characteristics
    Helinor J Johnston
    Centre for Nano Safety, School of Life Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, UK
    Nanotoxicology 4:207-46. 2010
    ..CNTs are therefore a group of materials whose useful exploitable properties prompts their increased production and utilization within diverse applications, so that ensuring their safety is of vital importance...
  2. pmc Identification of the mechanisms that drive the toxicity of TiO(2 )particulates: the contribution of physicochemical characteristics
    Helinor J Johnston
    Centre for Nano Safety, School of Life Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh EH10 5DT, UK
    Part Fibre Toxicol 6:33. 2009
    ..Thus emphasising that the physicochemical characteristics are fundamental to their toxicity...
  3. doi The biological mechanisms and physicochemical characteristics responsible for driving fullerene toxicity
    Helinor J Johnston
    Centre for Nano Safety, School of Life Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh EH10 5DT, UK
    Toxicol Sci 114:162-82. 2010
    ..The hazards to human health, associated with fullerene exposure, are uncertain at this time, and further investigations are required to decipher such effects before an effective risk assessment can be conducted...
  4. doi A review of the in vivo and in vitro toxicity of silver and gold particulates: particle attributes and biological mechanisms responsible for the observed toxicity
    Helinor J Johnston
    Centre for Nano Safety, School of Life Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, UK
    Crit Rev Toxicol 40:328-46. 2010
    ..Alternatively, a combination of both may be responsible, as the release of ions would be expected to be greater for smaller particles...
  5. doi Evaluating the uptake and intracellular fate of polystyrene nanoparticles by primary and hepatocyte cell lines in vitro
    Helinor J Johnston
    Biomedicine and Sport and Exercise Science Research Group, School of Life Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh EH10 5DT, UK
    Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 242:66-78. 2010
    ..The findings were, in the main, comparable between primary rat hepatocytes and the different human hepatocyte cell lines...
  6. doi Exploring the cellular and tissue uptake of nanomaterials in a range of biological samples using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy
    Helinor J Johnston
    Nano Safety Research Group, School of Life Sciences, Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, UK
    Nanotechnology 26:505102. 2015
    ..It is therefore a powerful tool that can be used to investigate unlabelled NM cellular and tissue uptake in three dimensions, requires minimal sample preparation, and is applicable to live and fixed cells. ..
  7. doi Approaches to Develop Alternative Testing Strategies to Inform Human Health Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials
    Vicki Stone
    School of Life Sciences, Nano Safety Research Group, Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh, UK
    Risk Anal 36:1538-50. 2016
    ..Case studies are included that can be used to inform the selection of alternative models and end points when assessing the pathogenicity of fibers and mode of action of nanomaterial toxicity. ..