Robert L Nudds

Summary

Affiliation: University of Manchester
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Rainbow trout provide the first experimental evidence for adherence to a distinct Strouhal number during animal oscillatory propulsion
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
    J Exp Biol 217:2244-9. 2014
  2. pmc Reassessment of the wing feathers of Archaeopteryx lithographica suggests no robust evidence for the presence of elongated dorsal wing coverts
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 9:e93963. 2014
  3. doi request reprint Locomotory abilities and habitat of the Cretaceous bird Gansus yumenensis inferred from limb length proportions
    R L Nudds
    University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
    J Evol Biol 26:150-4. 2013
  4. doi request reprint The metabolic cost of walking on gradients with a waddling gait
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
    J Exp Biol 215:2579-85. 2012
  5. doi request reprint Forelimb posture in dinosaurs and the evolution of the avian flapping flight-stroke
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Jacksons Mill, PO Box 88, Sackville St, Manchester, M60 1QD, United Kingdom
    Evolution 63:994-1002. 2009
  6. pmc Scaling of avian primary feather length
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 6:e15665. 2011
  7. pmc Evidence for energy savings from aerial running in the Svalbard rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea)
    R L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 278:2654-61. 2011
  8. doi request reprint Narrow primary feather rachises in Confuciusornis and Archaeopteryx suggest poor flight ability
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
    Science 328:887-9. 2010
  9. pmc Evidence for a mass dependent step-change in the scaling of efficiency in terrestrial locomotion
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 4:e6927. 2009
  10. pmc No apparent ecological trend to the flight-initiating jump performance of five bat species
    James D Gardiner
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
    J Exp Biol 214:2182-8. 2011

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications20

  1. doi request reprint Rainbow trout provide the first experimental evidence for adherence to a distinct Strouhal number during animal oscillatory propulsion
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
    J Exp Biol 217:2244-9. 2014
    ..Predicted future changes to T(water) of lakes and rivers (5-10 °C over the next 100 years) may not present major locomotory problems to salmonids...
  2. pmc Reassessment of the wing feathers of Archaeopteryx lithographica suggests no robust evidence for the presence of elongated dorsal wing coverts
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 9:e93963. 2014
    ..At this juncture, however, it is premature to conclude unequivocally that the wing of Archaeopteryx consisted of primary feathers overlaid with elongated coverts. ..
  3. doi request reprint Locomotory abilities and habitat of the Cretaceous bird Gansus yumenensis inferred from limb length proportions
    R L Nudds
    University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
    J Evol Biol 26:150-4. 2013
    ..Nevertheless, our analyses suggest that it is probable that this bird was both volant and capable of diving to some degree using either foot-propelled or, perhaps, both its wings and its feet for underwater locomotion...
  4. doi request reprint The metabolic cost of walking on gradients with a waddling gait
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
    J Exp Biol 215:2579-85. 2012
    ..It is likely that a suite of factors, such as ecology, posture, gait, leggedness and foot morphology, will subtly affect an organism's ability to negotiate gradients...
  5. doi request reprint Forelimb posture in dinosaurs and the evolution of the avian flapping flight-stroke
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Jacksons Mill, PO Box 88, Sackville St, Manchester, M60 1QD, United Kingdom
    Evolution 63:994-1002. 2009
    ....
  6. pmc Scaling of avian primary feather length
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 6:e15665. 2011
    ..Within the wing, variations in underlying bone and feather lengths nevertheless may, in altering the joint positions, permit a range of different flight styles by facilitating variation in upstroke kinematics...
  7. pmc Evidence for energy savings from aerial running in the Svalbard rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea)
    R L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 278:2654-61. 2011
    ..It may be that grounded running is just an artefact of treadmill studies. Research investigating the speeds used by animals in the field is sorely needed...
  8. doi request reprint Narrow primary feather rachises in Confuciusornis and Archaeopteryx suggest poor flight ability
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
    Science 328:887-9. 2010
    ..Alternatively, if they were only gliders, then the flapping wing stroke must have appeared after the divergence of Confuciusornis, likely within the enantiornithine or ornithurine radiations...
  9. pmc Evidence for a mass dependent step-change in the scaling of efficiency in terrestrial locomotion
    Robert L Nudds
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 4:e6927. 2009
    ..A homogenous study of the mechanical cost of terrestrial locomotion across a broad range of species, body sizes, and importantly locomotor postures is a priority for future research...
  10. pmc No apparent ecological trend to the flight-initiating jump performance of five bat species
    James D Gardiner
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
    J Exp Biol 214:2182-8. 2011
    ..e. flight so dominates bat locomotor morphology that other locomotor abilities tend to be derivative...
  11. pmc Barnacle geese achieve significant energetic savings by changing posture
    Peter G Tickle
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
    PLoS ONE 7:e46950. 2012
    ..Due to the significant effect of posture, future studies of resting metabolic rates need to take into account and/or report differences in posture...
  12. pmc Understanding sex differences in the cost of terrestrial locomotion
    John J Lees
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 279:826-32. 2012
    ..While the mechanisms underlying these energetic differences are unclear, future studies should be wary when pooling male and female data...
  13. doi request reprint The effects of season and sex upon the morphology and material properties of keratin in the Svalbard rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea)
    John J Lees
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
    J Therm Biol 44:126-30. 2014
    ....
  14. doi request reprint Variety, sex and ontogenetic differences in the pelvic limb muscle architectural properties of leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and their links with locomotor performance
    Kayleigh A Rose
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
    J Anat 228:952-64. 2016
    ....
  15. pmc The peacock train does not handicap cursorial locomotor performance
    Nathan K Thavarajah
    The Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PT, UK
    Sci Rep 6:36512. 2016
    ..Our findings suggest that adaptations that mitigate any costs associated with exaggerated morphology are central in the evolution of sexually selected traits...
  16. doi request reprint Differential sex-specific walking kinematics in leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) selectively bred for different body size
    Kayleigh A Rose
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
    J Exp Biol 219:2525-33. 2016
    ..Lower DF in males relative to females may also be a work-minimising strategy and/or due to greater limb inertia (as a result of greater pelvic limb muscle mass) prolonging the swing phase. ..
  17. pmc The influence of flight style on the aerodynamic properties of avian wings as fixed lifting surfaces
    John J Lees
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
    Peerj 4:e2495. 2016
    ..Taken at face value, the results also suggest that wing-shape is linked principally to changes in aerodynamic drag, but, of course, it is aerodynamics during flapping and not gliding that is likely to be the primary driver...
  18. pmc The potential impacts of migratory difficulty, including warmer waters and altered flow conditions, on the reproductive success of salmonid fishes
    Miriam Fenkes
    University of Manchester, Faculty of Life Sciences, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, United Kingdom Electronic address
    Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol 193:11-21. 2016
    ..This review focuses on the specific locomotor responses of salmonids to thermal and hydrological challenges, identifying gaps in our knowledge and highlighting the potential implications for key aspects of their reproduction. ..
  19. pmc Intraspecific scaling of the minimum metabolic cost of transport in leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus): links with limb kinematics, morphometrics and posture
    Kayleigh A Rose
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
    J Exp Biol 218:1028-34. 2015
    ....
  20. pmc A potential role for bat tail membranes in flight control
    James D Gardiner
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingom
    PLoS ONE 6:e18214. 2011
    ..Although the tail of bats is different from that of birds, in that it is only divided from the wings by the legs, it nonetheless, may, in addition to its prey capturing function, fulfil a similar role in aiding flight control...