R A Johnstone

Summary

Affiliation: University of Cambridge
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc Cooperation and the common good
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 371:20150086. 2016
  2. pmc Sex-biased dispersal, haplodiploidy and the evolution of helping in social insects
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 279:787-93. 2012
  3. pmc Eavesdropping and animal conflict
    R A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:9177-80. 2001
  4. ncbi request reprint The evolution of inaccurate mimics
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Nature 418:524-6. 2002
  5. doi request reprint Kin selection, local competition, and reproductive skew
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom
    Evolution 62:2592-9. 2008
  6. doi request reprint Sex differences in dispersal and the evolution of helping and harming
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 172:318-30. 2008
  7. doi request reprint Mutualism, market effects and partner control
    R A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, UK
    J Evol Biol 21:879-88. 2008
  8. pmc Indirect reciprocity in asymmetric interactions: when apparent altruism facilitates profitable exploitation
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:3175-81. 2007
  9. pmc Coalition formation in animals and the nature of winner and loser effects
    R A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 267:17-21. 2000
  10. pmc Evolution of spite through indirect reciprocity
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 271:1917-22. 2004

Detail Information

Publications38

  1. pmc Cooperation and the common good
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 371:20150086. 2016
    ....
  2. pmc Sex-biased dispersal, haplodiploidy and the evolution of helping in social insects
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 279:787-93. 2012
    ..We thus conclude that Hamilton was correct in his claim that 'family relationships in the Hymenoptera are potentially very favourable to the evolution of reproductive altruism'...
  3. pmc Eavesdropping and animal conflict
    R A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98:9177-80. 2001
    ..However, it also promotes increased aggression, because it enhances the value of victory. The net result is that escalated conflicts are predicted to occur more frequently when eavesdropping is possible...
  4. ncbi request reprint The evolution of inaccurate mimics
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Nature 418:524-6. 2002
    ..Where individual mimics are related to others in their vicinity, kin selection will then oppose the evolution of accurate mimicry...
  5. doi request reprint Kin selection, local competition, and reproductive skew
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom
    Evolution 62:2592-9. 2008
    ..As a result, philopatry tends to exaggerate differences in reproductive success, and so promotes greater reproductive skew...
  6. doi request reprint Sex differences in dispersal and the evolution of helping and harming
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 172:318-30. 2008
    ..In general, the rate of dispersal and the level of relatedness among individuals of one sex do not reliably predict their level of helping or harming behavior; selection on either males or females depends on the dispersal of both sexes...
  7. doi request reprint Mutualism, market effects and partner control
    R A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, UK
    J Evol Biol 21:879-88. 2008
    ..Below a critical level of relative victim abundance, the model suggests that the cost of finding a replacement partner becomes so great that it does not pay to exploit at all...
  8. pmc Indirect reciprocity in asymmetric interactions: when apparent altruism facilitates profitable exploitation
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 274:3175-81. 2007
    ..Indirect reciprocity is thus possible even in asymmetric interactions in which one party cannot directly 'punish' exploitation or 'reward' helping by the other...
  9. pmc Coalition formation in animals and the nature of winner and loser effects
    R A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 267:17-21. 2000
    ....
  10. pmc Evolution of spite through indirect reciprocity
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 271:1917-22. 2004
    ..Existing theory suggests spite is unlikely to persist, but we demonstrate that it may do so when spiteful individuals are less likely to incur aggression from observers (a negative form of indirect reciprocity)...
  11. ncbi request reprint Begging and sibling competition: how should offspring respond to their rivals?
    R A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 163:388-406. 2004
    ..Dominants are then predicted to parasitize the efforts of their weaker rivals and reduce their own investment in cooperative signaling while continuing to claim a disproportionately large share of the resources provided by the parent...
  12. pmc The influence of phenotypic and genetic effects on maternal provisioning and offspring weight gain in mice
    Reinmar Hager
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Biol Lett 2:81-4. 2006
    ..We suggest that this disparity may hint at the inefficiency of offspring solicitation behaviour or effects of sibling competition...
  13. ncbi request reprint Self-serving punishment and the evolution of cooperation
    M A Cant
    Department of Zoology, Cambridge University, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    J Evol Biol 19:1383-5; discussion 1426-36. 2006
  14. ncbi request reprint The evolution of paternal care with overlapping broods
    Andrea Manica
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom
    Am Nat 164:517-30. 2004
    ..We believe our model might help explain the prevalence of male uniparental care in certain taxa, such as fish...
  15. pmc The evolution of menopause in cetaceans and humans: the role of demography
    Rufus A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 277:3765-71. 2010
    ..Our analysis can therefore help to explain why, of all long-lived, social mammals, it is specifically among the great apes and toothed whales that menopause and post-reproductive helping have evolved...
  16. pmc Costs and benefits of multi-male associations in redfronted lemurs (Eulemur fulvus rufus)
    Markus Port
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Biol Lett 6:620-2. 2010
    ..This benefit is large enough to outweigh the costs of reproductive competition and may constitute the driving force behind the evolution of multi-male associations in this species...
  17. doi request reprint Pairs of fish resolve conflicts over coordinated movement by taking turns
    Jennifer L Harcourt
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Curr Biol 20:156-60. 2010
    ..Our results confirm theoretical predictions that conflict over group coordination can be resolved by taking turns [7-10] and show that, in this system, the pattern of alternation is actively monitored and maintained...
  18. ncbi request reprint Cost, competition and information in communication between relatives
    Ben O Brilot
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EJ, UK
    J Theor Biol 217:331-40. 2002
    ..As a result, there is a general increase in the amount of broadcast information in a non-costly signal with increasing competitor number...
  19. pmc The limits to cost-free signalling of need between relatives
    Ben O Brilot
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 270:1055-60. 2003
    ..Later, informative yet cost-free signalling is unlikely to persist...
  20. ncbi request reprint The genetic basis of family conflict resolution in mice
    Reinmar Hager
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Nature 421:533-5. 2003
    ..Instead, we show that there is positive coadaptation such that offspring obtain more resources from foster mothers of the same strain as their natural mother, irrespective of their father's strain...
  21. ncbi request reprint Spontaneous emergence of leaders and followers in foraging pairs
    Sean A Rands
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Nature 423:432-4. 2003
    ..Moreover, the strategy that gives rise to this behaviour can be implemented by a simple 'rule of thumb' that requires no detailed knowledge of the state of other individuals...
  22. pmc The evolution of cooperative breeding through group augmentation
    H Kokko
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 268:187-96. 2001
    ....
  23. pmc Early experience and parent-of-origin-specific effects influence female reproductive success in mice
    Reinmar Hager
    University of Cambridge, Department of Zoology, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Biol Lett 2:253-6. 2006
    ....
  24. pmc Statistical measures for defining an individual's degree of independence within state-dependent dynamic games
    Sean A Rands
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    BMC Evol Biol 6:81. 2006
    ..State-dependent modelling techniques are a powerful tool for exploring group decision-making processes, but analyses conducted so far have lacked methods for identifying how dependent an individual's actions are on the rest of the group...
  25. doi request reprint Sexual selection and condition-dependence
    R A Johnstone
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    J Evol Biol 22:2387-94. 2009
    ..This leads us to question how much of the information content of sexual signals can be attributed to sexual selection, and how much to pre-existing, naturally-selected condition-dependence...
  26. pmc Managing uncertainty: information and insurance under the risk of starvation
    Sasha R X Dall
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EJ, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 357:1519-26. 2002
    ..This indicates that gathering information is a luxury while insurance is a necessity, at least when foraging on stochastic and variable food under the risk of starvation...
  27. doi request reprint Social feedback and the emergence of leaders and followers
    Jennifer L Harcourt
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
    Curr Biol 19:248-52. 2009
    ..We conclude that leadership in this case is reinforced by positive social feedback...
  28. doi request reprint Parent-offspring conflict and coadaptation
    Camilla A Hinde
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Science 327:1373-6. 2010
    ..Parent-offspring conflict may thus be responsible for the selective forces that generate parent-offspring coadaptation...
  29. pmc The emergence of leaders and followers in foraging pairs when the qualities of individuals differ
    Sean A Rands
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    BMC Evol Biol 8:51. 2008
    ..We examine how a pair of animals should behave using a state-dependent approach, and ask what conditions are likely to lead to behavioural synchronisation occurring, and whether one of the individuals is more likely to act as a leader...
  30. pmc Optimal assessment of multiple cues
    Tim W Fawcett
    Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 270:1637-43. 2003
    ..Our findings are applicable to other discrimination tasks besides mate choice, for example a predator's choice between palatable and unpalatable prey, or an altruist's choice between kin and non-kin...
  31. ncbi request reprint Integrating cooperative breeding into theoretical concepts of cooperation
    Ralph Bergmüller
    Department of Eco Ethology, Institute of Biology, University of Neuchatel, Rue Emile Argand 11, CH 2009 Neuchatel, Switzerland
    Behav Processes 76:61-72. 2007
    ..The key challenges for both theoreticians and empiricists will be to integrate the hitherto disparate fields and to disentangle the parallel effects of kin and non-kin based mechanisms of cooperation...
  32. ncbi request reprint On the further integration of cooperative breeding and cooperation theory
    Ralph Bergmüller
    Department of Eco Ethology, Institute of Biology, University of Neuchatel, Rue Emile Argand 11, CH 2009 Neuchatel, Switzerland
    Behav Processes 76:170-81. 2007
    ..We conclude that the contributions in this special issue provide a fruitful first step and ample suggestions for future directions with regard to a more unified framework of cooperation in cooperative breeders...
  33. ncbi request reprint Uninformative exaggeration of male sexual ornaments in barn swallows
    Jakob Bro-Jørgensen
    Department of Biological Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, United Kingdom
    Curr Biol 17:850-5. 2007
    ..Therefore, contrary to handicap models of sexual selection, the sexually selected exaggeration of this trait provides females with little information about any aspect of mate quality..
  34. ncbi request reprint Context-dependent discrimination and the evolution of mimicry
    Øistein Haugsten Holen
    Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biology, University of Oslo, P O Box 1050 Blindern, N 0316 Oslo, Norway
    Am Nat 167:377-89. 2006
    ..We discuss context-dependent discrimination among signal receivers in relation to small-scale synchrony in model and mimic activity patterns...
  35. ncbi request reprint The evolution of mimicry under constraints
    Øistein Haugsten Holen
    Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biology, University of Oslo, P O Box 1050 Blindern, N 0316 Oslo, Norway
    Am Nat 164:598-613. 2004
    ..Surprisingly, improved discrimination abilities among signal receivers may sometimes select for less accurate mimicry...
  36. pmc Why is mutual mate choice not the norm? Operational sex ratios, sex roles and the evolution of sexually dimorphic and monomorphic signalling
    Hanna Kokko
    Division of Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 357:319-30. 2002
    ..This divergence is prevented, and mutual mate choice maintained, if synergistic benefits of biparental care render parental investment both high and not too different in the two sexes...
  37. pmc Reproductive conflict and the separation of reproductive generations in humans
    Michael A Cant
    Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9EZ, United Kingdom
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:5332-6. 2008
    ..A model incorporating both the costs of reproductive competition and the benefits of grandmothering can account for the timing of reproductive cessation in humans and so offers an improved understanding of the evolution of menopause...
  38. pmc Wide faces or large canines? The attractive versus the aggressive primate
    Eleanor M Weston
    Department of Paleoanthropology, Research Institute Senckenberg, Senckenberganlage 25, 60325 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S416-9. 2004
    ..Enlarged cheek-bones are linked with attractiveness in humans, and we propose that the evolution of a broad face and loss of large canines in hominid males results from mate choice...