M M Esiri

Summary

Affiliation: University of Oxford
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Which vascular lesions are of importance in vascular dementia?
    M M Esiri
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 903:239-43. 2000
  2. ncbi request reprint A postmortem study of the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus in schizophrenia
    T J Cullen
    Department of Clinical Neurology Neuropathology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, OX2 6HE, Oxford, UK
    Schizophr Res 60:157-66. 2003
  3. ncbi request reprint Association of the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism with Alzheimer's disease in men
    D J Lehmann
    Oxford Project to Investigate Memory and Ageing, Radcliffe Infirmary, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HE, UK
    Neurosci Lett 340:87-90. 2003
  4. ncbi request reprint The contribution of demyelination to axonal loss in multiple sclerosis
    G C DeLuca
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Brain 129:1507-16. 2006
  5. ncbi request reprint Size of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in schizophrenia
    J R Highley
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, UK
    Br J Psychiatry 183:414-7. 2003
  6. ncbi request reprint Axonal loss in multiple sclerosis: a pathological survey of the corticospinal and sensory tracts
    G C DeLuca
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Brain 127:1009-18. 2004
  7. ncbi request reprint Depression in the elderly: pathological study of raphe and locus ceruleus
    A Syed
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol 31:405-13. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint The cytoarchitecture of sulcal folding in Heschl's sulcus and the temporal cortex in the normal brain and schizophrenia: lamina thickness and cell density
    S A Chance
    Schizophrenia Research Group, Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HE, UK
    Neurosci Lett 367:384-8. 2004
  9. ncbi request reprint The extent of axonal loss in the long tracts in hereditary spastic paraplegia
    G C DeLuca
    Departments of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol 30:576-84. 2004
  10. ncbi request reprint Axonal damage: a key predictor of outcome in human CNS diseases
    I M Medana
    Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, University of Oxford, UK
    Brain 126:515-30. 2003

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications32

  1. ncbi request reprint Which vascular lesions are of importance in vascular dementia?
    M M Esiri
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
    Ann N Y Acad Sci 903:239-43. 2000
    ....
  2. ncbi request reprint A postmortem study of the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus in schizophrenia
    T J Cullen
    Department of Clinical Neurology Neuropathology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, OX2 6HE, Oxford, UK
    Schizophr Res 60:157-66. 2003
    ..Hence our negative observations, in the largest sample yet investigated, cast doubt on the robustness and/or the generalisability of MD neuropathology in schizophrenia...
  3. ncbi request reprint Association of the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism with Alzheimer's disease in men
    D J Lehmann
    Oxford Project to Investigate Memory and Ageing, Radcliffe Infirmary, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HE, UK
    Neurosci Lett 340:87-90. 2003
    ..5, 95% confidence intervals: 1.2-5.0) in men, but not in women. This association appeared stronger in early-onset AD (< 65 years). We conclude that this AR polymorphism is of potential relevance to the risk of AD in men...
  4. ncbi request reprint The contribution of demyelination to axonal loss in multiple sclerosis
    G C DeLuca
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Brain 129:1507-16. 2006
    ..Since there was little correlation between plaque load and axonal loss, the possibility that demyelination is not the primary determinant of spinal cord axonal loss warrants consideration...
  5. ncbi request reprint Size of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in schizophrenia
    J R Highley
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, UK
    Br J Psychiatry 183:414-7. 2003
    ..Meta-analyses of hippocampal size have indicated that this structure is smaller in schizophrenia. This could reflect a reduction in the size of constituent neurons or a reduced number of neurons...
  6. ncbi request reprint Axonal loss in multiple sclerosis: a pathological survey of the corticospinal and sensory tracts
    G C DeLuca
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Brain 127:1009-18. 2004
    ..In multiple sclerosis, axonal loss is widespread, and its extent is tract specific and size selective...
  7. ncbi request reprint Depression in the elderly: pathological study of raphe and locus ceruleus
    A Syed
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol 31:405-13. 2005
    ..However, because of the small numbers of cases studied and our inability to carry out a full stereological study because of tissue limitations the findings are preliminary...
  8. ncbi request reprint The cytoarchitecture of sulcal folding in Heschl's sulcus and the temporal cortex in the normal brain and schizophrenia: lamina thickness and cell density
    S A Chance
    Schizophrenia Research Group, Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HE, UK
    Neurosci Lett 367:384-8. 2004
    ..Sampling methods should consider that cortical folding affects cell and lamina distribution in the sampled region in a highly localised manner...
  9. ncbi request reprint The extent of axonal loss in the long tracts in hereditary spastic paraplegia
    G C DeLuca
    Departments of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol 30:576-84. 2004
    ..The characterization of the nature of axonal loss in HSP, where this is a primary phenomenon, may help the interpretation of axonal loss in conditions such as multiple sclerosis where the sequence of events is less clear...
  10. ncbi request reprint Axonal damage: a key predictor of outcome in human CNS diseases
    I M Medana
    Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, University of Oxford, UK
    Brain 126:515-30. 2003
    ..We consider the possible pathogenetic mechanisms involved and how increasing understanding of these may lead to more effective therapeutic or preventive interventions...
  11. ncbi request reprint The locus coeruleus in schizophrenia: a postmortem study of noradrenergic neurones
    R M Craven
    Schizophrenia Research Group, University Department of Clinical Neurology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol 31:115-26. 2005
    ..The findings presented here concur with previous studies suggesting that noradrenergic dysfunction in schizophrenia is not associated with an anatomical abnormality at the level of the LC...
  12. ncbi request reprint Cerebral calpain in fatal falciparum malaria
    I M Medana
    Nuffield Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol 33:179-92. 2007
    ..Our findings implicate a role for calpains in the modulation of disease progression in CM...
  13. pmc Genetic association of an LBP-1c/CP2/LSF gene polymorphism with late onset Alzheimer's disease
    A E Taylor
    Department of Medical Genetics, Wellcome Trust Centre for Molecular Mechanisms in Disease, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Wellcome MRC Building, Addenbrooke s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2XY, UK
    J Med Genet 38:232-3. 2001
    ..Samples were diagnosed predominantly by clinical rather than pathological criteria. We have sought to replicate this finding in a series of necropsy confirmed, late onset AD cases and non-demented controls...
  14. ncbi request reprint Neocortical neuronal, synaptic, and glial loss in multiple sclerosis
    C Wegner
    Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, University of Oxford, UK
    Neurology 67:960-7. 2006
    ..Structural MRI has shown that neocortical atrophy occurs early and can be substantial, but the specific substrate for this atrophy has not been defined quantitatively...
  15. ncbi request reprint Size-selective neuronal changes in the anterior optic pathways suggest a differential susceptibility to injury in multiple sclerosis
    N Evangelou
    Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain, University of Oxford, UK
    Brain 124:1813-20. 2001
    ....
  16. ncbi request reprint Psychosis of Alzheimer's disease is associated with elevated muscarinic M2 binding in the cortex
    M K Lai
    Neurodegenerative Diseases Program, Department of Neurology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
    Neurology 57:805-11. 2001
    ..This study aimed to measure alterations of muscarinic M(1) and M(2) receptor binding in the frontal and temporal cortex of AD and to correlate the neurochemical findings with clinical features...
  17. ncbi request reprint Vulnerability to Alzheimer's pathology in neocortex: the roles of plasticity and columnar organization
    M M Esiri
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    J Alzheimers Dis 9:79-89. 2006
    ..The original interpretation that this distribution of NFT reflects pathology in neurons subserving cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical connections seems to us to have stood the test of time...
  18. ncbi request reprint Ageing and the brain
    M M Esiri
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, and Department of Neuropathology, Oxford Radcliffe NHS Trust, Oxford, UK
    J Pathol 211:181-7. 2007
    ..The roles of genes and environmental factors in causing and responding to ageing changes are explored...
  19. ncbi request reprint Imbalance of a serotonergic system in frontotemporal dementia: implication for pharmacotherapy
    D M Bowen
    Department of Neuropathology, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, OX3 9DU, UK
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 196:603-10. 2008
    ..Information is sparse on neurotransmitter deficiencies in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), in particular with reference to distinct histological subgroups and Alzheimer's disease (AD)...
  20. ncbi request reprint The dorsal raphe nucleus in schizophrenia: a post mortem study of 5-hydroxytryptamine neurones
    R M Craven
    Schizophrenia Research Group, University Department of Clinical Neurology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK
    Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol 31:258-69. 2005
    ..Our results do not support the proposal that an abnormality in the number and/or size of DRN 5-HT neurones is central to the aetiopathology of schizophrenia...
  21. pmc Severe cerebral congophilic angiopathy coincident with increased brain aluminium in a resident of Camelford, Cornwall, UK
    C Exley
    Birchall Centre for Inorganic Chemistry and Materials Science, Lennard Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK
    J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 77:877-9. 2006
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Loss of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors in the postmortem temporal cortex correlates with rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease
    M K Lai
    Dementia Research Laboratory, Department of Clinical Research, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, 169608, Singapore
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 179:673-7. 2005
    ..Previous studies have demonstrated reductions of serotonin 5-HT 2A receptors in the neocortex of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. However, it is unclear whether such losses play a role in the cognitive decline of AD...
  23. pmc Herpes simplex encephalitis: involvement of apolipoprotein E genotype
    W R Lin
    Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Optometry and Neuroscience, UMIST, Manchester M60 1QD, UK
    J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 70:117-9. 2001
    ..6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2. 0-10.8). The apoE epsilon3 and epsilon4 allele frequencies did not differ significantly between the two groups. Thus, it seems that apoE epsilon2 is a risk factor for HSE...
  24. ncbi request reprint The BACE gene: genomic structure and candidate gene study in late-onset Alzheimer's disease
    T Murphy
    Department of Medical Genetics, Wellcome Trust Centre for Molecular Mechanisms in Disease, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, UK
    Neuroreport 12:631-4. 2001
    ..Thus, we find no evidence that this locus influences risk for late-onset AD...
  25. ncbi request reprint Schizophrenia and the frontal lobes: post-mortem stereological study of tissue volume
    J R Highley
    Schizophrenia Research Group, Department of Clinical Neurology (Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford OX3 7JX, UK
    Br J Psychiatry 178:337-43. 2001
    ..CONCLUSIONS: Such structural abnormalities as are present in the frontal lobes are more subtle than straightforward alterations in tissue volume; they may include changes in shape and the pattern of gyral folding...
  26. ncbi request reprint Constructional apraxia in Alzheimer's disease: association with occipital lobe pathology and accelerated cognitive decline
    M Z Smith
    OPTIMA, Departments of Neuropathology and Pharmacology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
    Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 12:281-8. 2001
    ..Additionally our findings indicate that early constructional apraxia is a predictor of accelerated cognitive decline in AD...
  27. ncbi request reprint Synaptic pathology in prefrontal cortex is present only with severe dementia in Alzheimer disease
    S L Minger
    Dementia Research Laboratory, Neuroscience Research Centre, GKT School of Biomedical Sciences, King's College London, United Kingdom
    J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 60:929-36. 2001
    ..Considerable synaptic reserve or plasticity remains in BA 46 until the late stages of AD. Synaptophysin and ChAT appear to be more vulnerable in severe AD than are syntaxin or SNAP-25...
  28. ncbi request reprint Evidence for a role for apoptosis in central pontine myelinolysis
    G C DeLuca
    Department of Neuropathology and Clinical Neurology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford OX2 6HE, UK
    Acta Neuropathol 103:590-8. 2002
    ..Further study of this mechanism in CPM may lead to identification of factors that could reduce or prevent this rare but serious and often fatal disease...
  29. ncbi request reprint [3H]GR113808 binding to serotonin 5-HT(4) receptors in the postmortem neocortex of Alzheimer disease: a clinicopathological study
    M K Lai
    Department of Pharmacology, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    J Neural Transm 110:779-88. 2003
    ..We conclude that unlike other 5-HT receptors, 5-HT(4) receptor binding affinity and density do not seem to be affected in the frontal and temporal cortex in AD and may not have a direct role in the clinical features of the disease...
  30. ncbi request reprint Evidence of axonal damage in human acute demyelinating diseases
    N Ghosh
    Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, UK
    J Neurol Sci 222:29-34. 2004
    ..Substantial axon damage, detected by immunostaining for beta amyloid precursor protein (betaAPP) has been demonstrated in acute demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis...
  31. ncbi request reprint Pathological study of spinal cord atrophy in multiple sclerosis suggests limited role of local lesions
    N Evangelou
    Department of Neurology, Queen s Medical Centre, University Hospital NHS Trust, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK
    Brain 128:29-34. 2005
    ....
  32. doi request reprint Loss of [3H]4-DAMP binding to muscarinic receptors in the orbitofrontal cortex of Alzheimer's disease patients with psychosis
    S W Y Tsang
    Dementia Research Laboratory, Department of Clinical Research, Singapore General Hospital, Outram Road, Outram Park 169608, Singapore
    Psychopharmacology (Berl) 198:251-9. 2008
    ..In contrast, it is unclear whether non-M2 muscarinic receptors have a role to play in AD behavioural symptoms...