Jackie Chappell

Summary

Affiliation: University of Birmingham
Country: UK

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint Bird brains: Does absolute size matter?
    Jackie Chappell
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
    Learn Behav . 2016
  2. pmc Biological and artificial cognition: what can we learn about mechanisms by modelling physical cognition problems using artificial intelligence planning techniques?
    Jackie Chappell
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 367:2723-32. 2012
  3. doi request reprint How to build an information gathering and processing system: lessons from naturally and artificially intelligent systems
    Jackie Chappell
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT Birmingham, UK
    Behav Processes 89:179-86. 2012
  4. ncbi request reprint Avian cognition: understanding tool use
    Jackie Chappell
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, UK
    Curr Biol 16:R244-5. 2006
  5. doi request reprint A novel test of planning ability: great apes can plan step-by-step but not in advance of action
    Emma C Tecwyn
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK Electronic address
    Behav Processes 100:174-84. 2013
  6. pmc The development of tool manufacture in humans: what helps young children make innovative tools?
    Jackie Chappell
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 368:20120409. 2013
  7. doi request reprint Making tools isn't child's play
    Sarah R Beck
    School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
    Cognition 119:301-6. 2011
  8. pmc Individual differences in children's innovative problem-solving are not predicted by divergent thinking or executive functions
    Sarah R Beck
    School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, West Midlands, B15 2TT, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 371:. 2016
  9. doi request reprint The puzzling difficulty of tool innovation: why can't children piece their knowledge together?
    Nicola Cutting
    School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK Electronic address
    J Exp Child Psychol 125:110-7. 2014
  10. doi request reprint Development of planning in 4- to 10-year-old children: reducing inhibitory demands does not improve performance
    Emma C Tecwyn
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK Electronic address
    J Exp Child Psychol 125:85-101. 2014

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications18

  1. ncbi request reprint Bird brains: Does absolute size matter?
    Jackie Chappell
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
    Learn Behav . 2016
    ..However, birds performed at an equivalent level to much larger-brained primates, opening up the debate about brain size and cognition...
  2. pmc Biological and artificial cognition: what can we learn about mechanisms by modelling physical cognition problems using artificial intelligence planning techniques?
    Jackie Chappell
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 367:2723-32. 2012
    ..We discuss the results of the models and compare them with the results from the experiments with orangutans, describing the advantages of this approach, and the ways in which it could be extended...
  3. doi request reprint How to build an information gathering and processing system: lessons from naturally and artificially intelligent systems
    Jackie Chappell
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT Birmingham, UK
    Behav Processes 89:179-86. 2012
    ....
  4. ncbi request reprint Avian cognition: understanding tool use
    Jackie Chappell
    Centre for Ornithology, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, UK
    Curr Biol 16:R244-5. 2006
    ..Although rooks are considered non-tool-using animals, a recent study has shown that they learn to solve a 'trap-tube' task faster than many tool-using primates, raising questions about the evolution of sophisticated physical cognition...
  5. doi request reprint A novel test of planning ability: great apes can plan step-by-step but not in advance of action
    Emma C Tecwyn
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK Electronic address
    Behav Processes 100:174-84. 2013
    ..Poor performance in experiment 1 may have been related to subjects' difficulty in inhibiting the prepotent response to act on the reward immediately. ..
  6. pmc The development of tool manufacture in humans: what helps young children make innovative tools?
    Jackie Chappell
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 368:20120409. 2013
    ..We will discuss the implications of these findings for understanding the development of problem-solving in humans and other animals...
  7. doi request reprint Making tools isn't child's play
    Sarah R Beck
    School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
    Cognition 119:301-6. 2011
    ..Children's tool innovation lags substantially behind their ability to learn how to make tools by observing others...
  8. pmc Individual differences in children's innovative problem-solving are not predicted by divergent thinking or executive functions
    Sarah R Beck
    School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, West Midlands, B15 2TT, UK
    Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 371:. 2016
    ..We did not find evidence that children's innovation was predicted by specific personal characteristics. ..
  9. doi request reprint The puzzling difficulty of tool innovation: why can't children piece their knowledge together?
    Nicola Cutting
    School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK Electronic address
    J Exp Child Psychol 125:110-7. 2014
    ..Older children struggled to bring to mind components of the solution but could coordinate them, whereas younger children could not coordinate components even when explicitly provided...
  10. doi request reprint Development of planning in 4- to 10-year-old children: reducing inhibitory demands does not improve performance
    Emma C Tecwyn
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK Electronic address
    J Exp Child Psychol 125:85-101. 2014
    ....
  11. doi request reprint What cognitive strategies do orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) use to solve a trial-unique puzzle-tube task incorporating multiple obstacles?
    Emma C Tecwyn
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK
    Anim Cogn 15:121-33. 2012
    ..Successful subjects may have been using a heuristic rule combination based on what they deemed to be the most relevant cue (the configuration of the puzzle-tube ends), which may be a cognitively economical strategy...
  12. pmc The Ontogeny of Gap Crossing Behaviour in Bornean Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii)
    Jackie Chappell
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 10:e0130291. 2015
    ....
  13. doi request reprint Extreme binocular vision and a straight bill facilitate tool use in New Caledonian crows
    Jolyon Troscianko
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    Nat Commun 3:1110. 2012
    ..To our knowledge, this is the first evidence for tool-use-related morphological features outside the hominin lineage...
  14. doi request reprint Tool innovation may be a critical limiting step for the establishment of a rich tool-using culture: a perspective from child development
    Sarah R Beck
    School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom
    Behav Brain Sci 35:220-1. 2012
    ..Our tool-rich culture may be more reliant on social learning and more limited by domain-general constraints such as ill-structured problem solving than otherwise thought...
  15. ncbi request reprint Selection of tool diameter by New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides
    Jackie Chappell
    Department of Zoology, South Parks Road, OX1 3PS, Oxford, UK
    Anim Cogn 7:121-7. 2004
    ..These results add to the developing picture of New Caledonian crows as sophisticated tool users and manufacturers, having an advanced level of folk physics...
  16. ncbi request reprint Shaping of hooks in New Caledonian crows
    Alex A S Weir
    Department of Zoology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Science 297:981. 2002
  17. pmc Lateralization of tool use in New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides)
    Alex A S Weir
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 271:S344-6. 2004
    ..leaves, and suggest that the manufacture and use of tools in this species may have different neural underpinnings...
  18. ncbi request reprint Tool selectivity in a non-primate, the New Caledonian crow (Corvus moneduloides)
    Jackie Chappell
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OXI 3PS, UK
    Anim Cogn 5:71-8. 2002
    ..The task was completed only by the male, who chose a tool of sufficient length significantly more often than chance but did not show a preference for a matching length...