Graham N Askew

Summary

Affiliation: University of Leeds
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint The elaborate plumage in peacocks is not such a drag
    Graham N Askew
    Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    J Exp Biol 217:3237-41. 2014
  2. pmc Limitations imposed by wearing armour on Medieval soldiers' locomotor performance
    Graham N Askew
    Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 279:640-4. 2012
  3. ncbi request reprint The mechanical power output of the flight muscles of blue-breasted quail (Coturnix chinensis) during take-off
    G N Askew
    Department of Zoology, Downing Street, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    J Exp Biol 204:3601-19. 2001
  4. ncbi request reprint Muscle designed for maximum short-term power output: quail flight muscle
    Graham N Askew
    School of Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    J Exp Biol 205:2153-60. 2002
  5. ncbi request reprint Mechanical properties of the latissimus dorsi muscle after cyclic training
    Graham N Askew
    School of Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdom
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 93:649-59. 2002
  6. pmc The mechanical power requirements of avian flight
    G N Askew
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    Biol Lett 3:445-8. 2007
  7. doi request reprint The scaling of myofibrillar actomyosin ATPase activity in apid bee flight muscle in relation to hovering flight energetics
    Graham N Askew
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Exp Biol 213:1195-206. 2010
  8. ncbi request reprint The mechanical power output of the pectoralis muscle of blue-breasted quail (Coturnix chinensis): the in vivo length cycle and its implications for muscle performance
    G N Askew
    Department of Zoology, Downing Street, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    J Exp Biol 204:3587-600. 2001
  9. doi request reprint Comparison between mechanical power requirements of flight estimated using an aerodynamic model and in vitro muscle performance in the cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus)
    Charlotte R Morris
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Exp Biol 213:2781-7. 2010
  10. ncbi request reprint Modulation of pectoralis muscle function in budgerigars Melopsitaccus undulatus and zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata in response to changing flight speed
    David J Ellerby
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Exp Biol 210:3789-97. 2007

Detail Information

Publications18

  1. doi request reprint The elaborate plumage in peacocks is not such a drag
    Graham N Askew
    Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    J Exp Biol 217:3237-41. 2014
    ....
  2. pmc Limitations imposed by wearing armour on Medieval soldiers' locomotor performance
    Graham N Askew
    Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    Proc Biol Sci 279:640-4. 2012
    ..Our findings can predict age-associated decline in Medieval soldiers' physical performance, and have potential implications in understanding the outcomes of past European military battles...
  3. ncbi request reprint The mechanical power output of the flight muscles of blue-breasted quail (Coturnix chinensis) during take-off
    G N Askew
    Department of Zoology, Downing Street, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    J Exp Biol 204:3601-19. 2001
    ..The approximate constancy of power output means that the work output varies inversely with wingbeat frequency and reaches values of approximately 30-60 J kg(-1) in the largest species...
  4. ncbi request reprint Muscle designed for maximum short-term power output: quail flight muscle
    Graham N Askew
    School of Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    J Exp Biol 205:2153-60. 2002
    ..These considerations serve as a reminder that the maximum power-producing capacities of muscles need to be considered in the context of the in vivo situation within which the muscles operate...
  5. ncbi request reprint Mechanical properties of the latissimus dorsi muscle after cyclic training
    Graham N Askew
    School of Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdom
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 93:649-59. 2002
    ..The power output of the trained LD muscle was calculated to be sufficient to deliver a significant level of assistance to a failing heart during cardiomyoplasty...
  6. pmc The mechanical power requirements of avian flight
    G N Askew
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    Biol Lett 3:445-8. 2007
    ....
  7. doi request reprint The scaling of myofibrillar actomyosin ATPase activity in apid bee flight muscle in relation to hovering flight energetics
    Graham N Askew
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Exp Biol 213:1195-206. 2010
    ..g. the efficiency of mitochondrial oxidative recovery) may also scale with body mass...
  8. ncbi request reprint The mechanical power output of the pectoralis muscle of blue-breasted quail (Coturnix chinensis): the in vivo length cycle and its implications for muscle performance
    G N Askew
    Department of Zoology, Downing Street, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
    J Exp Biol 204:3587-600. 2001
    ....
  9. doi request reprint Comparison between mechanical power requirements of flight estimated using an aerodynamic model and in vitro muscle performance in the cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus)
    Charlotte R Morris
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Exp Biol 213:2781-7. 2010
    ..We found that the aerodynamic power-speed relationship was highly sensitive to the values assumed for these coefficients and best fit the power calculated from in vitro muscle performance when k=1.2, C(D, pro)=0.02 and C(D, par)=0.13...
  10. ncbi request reprint Modulation of pectoralis muscle function in budgerigars Melopsitaccus undulatus and zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata in response to changing flight speed
    David J Ellerby
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Exp Biol 210:3789-97. 2007
    ..Intermittent flight is only one component of a complex power modulation strategy...
  11. doi request reprint The mechanical power output of the pectoralis muscle of cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus): the in vivo muscle length trajectory and activity patterns and their implications for power modulation
    Charlotte R Morris
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Exp Biol 213:2770-80. 2010
    ..34 V(max)). It seems probable that the large pectoralis muscle strains result in a shift in the optimal relative shortening velocity in comparison with the optimum during isotonic contractions as a result of length-force effects...
  12. doi request reprint The metabolic power requirements of flight and estimations of flight muscle efficiency in the cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus)
    Charlotte R Morris
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Exp Biol 213:2788-96. 2010
    ..9% to 11.2%. However, it is probable that previous estimates of the postural costs of flight have been too low and that the pectoralis muscle efficiency is higher...
  13. ncbi request reprint Modulation of flight muscle power output in budgerigars Melopsittacus undulatus and zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata: in vitro muscle performance
    David J Ellerby
    Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Exp Biol 210:3780-8. 2007
    ....
  14. doi request reprint Locomotion on a slope in leaf-cutter ants: metabolic energy use, behavioural adaptations and the implications for route selection on hilly terrain
    Natalie C Holt
    Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
    J Exp Biol 215:2545-50. 2012
    ....
  15. doi request reprint The effects of asymmetric length trajectories on the initial mechanical efficiency of mouse soleus muscles
    Natalie C Holt
    Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    J Exp Biol 215:324-30. 2012
    ....
  16. pmc Intra-specific variation in wing morphology and its impact on take-off performance in blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) during escape flights
    Laura McFarlane
    Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    J Exp Biol 219:1369-77. 2016
    ..Understanding how wing morphology influences take-off performance gives insight into the potential risks associated with feather loss and seasonal and diurnal fluctuations in body mass. ..
  17. pmc The energetic benefits of tendon springs in running: is the reduction of muscle work important?
    Natalie C Holt
    School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
    J Exp Biol 217:4365-71. 2014
    ..We propose that the energetic benefits of tendons are derived primarily from their effect on muscle and limb architecture rather than their ability to reduce the cyclic work of muscle. ..
  18. ncbi request reprint Effects of caffeine on mouse skeletal muscle power output during recovery from fatigue
    Rob S James
    School of Science and the Environment, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB, UK
    J Appl Physiol (1985) 96:545-52. 2004
    ....