Michael W Peck

Summary

Affiliation: Institute for Animal Health
Country: UK

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Clostridium botulinum in the post-genomic era
    Michael W Peck
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, NR4 7UA, UK
    Food Microbiol 28:183-91. 2011
  2. ncbi request reprint Clostridium botulinum and the safety of minimally heated, chilled foods: an emerging issue?
    M W Peck
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, UK
    J Appl Microbiol 101:556-70. 2006
  3. pmc Development and application of a new method for specific and sensitive enumeration of spores of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum types B, E, and F in foods and food materials
    Michael W Peck
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 76:6607-14. 2010
  4. pmc Effects of carbon dioxide on growth of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, its ability to produce neurotoxin, and its transcriptome
    Ingrid Artin
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 76:1168-72. 2010
  5. doi request reprint Detection limit of Clostridium botulinum spores in dried mushroom samples sourced from China
    Pradeep K Malakar
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom
    Int J Food Microbiol 166:72-6. 2013
  6. pmc Genomic and physiological variability within Group II (non-proteolytic) Clostridium botulinum
    Sandra C Stringer
    Institute of Food Research IFR, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    BMC Genomics 14:333. 2013
  7. pmc The type F6 neurotoxin gene cluster locus of group II clostridium botulinum has evolved by successive disruption of two different ancestral precursors
    Andrew T Carter
    Department of Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Genome Biol Evol 5:1032-7. 2013
  8. pmc A predictive model that describes the effect of prolonged heating at 70 to 90 degrees C and subsequent incubation at refrigeration temperatures on growth from spores and toxigenesis by nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum in the presence of lysozyme
    P S Fernandez
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Laboratory, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 65:3449-57. 1999
  9. pmc Rapid affinity immunochromatography column-based tests for sensitive detection of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins and Escherichia coli O157
    Jason Brunt
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 76:4143-50. 2010
  10. pmc Historical and contemporary NaCl concentrations affect the duration and distribution of lag times from individual spores of nonproteolytic clostridium botulinum
    Martin D Webb
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:2118-27. 2007

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications44

  1. doi request reprint Clostridium botulinum in the post-genomic era
    Michael W Peck
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, NR4 7UA, UK
    Food Microbiol 28:183-91. 2011
    ..To better control the botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is important to understand spore resistance mechanisms, and the physiological processes involved in germination and lag phase during recovery from this dormant state...
  2. ncbi request reprint Clostridium botulinum and the safety of minimally heated, chilled foods: an emerging issue?
    M W Peck
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, UK
    J Appl Microbiol 101:556-70. 2006
    ..In particular, the desire to use lighter heat processes and a longer shelf life presents a challenge that will only be met by significant developments in quantitative microbiological food safety...
  3. pmc Development and application of a new method for specific and sensitive enumeration of spores of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum types B, E, and F in foods and food materials
    Michael W Peck
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 76:6607-14. 2010
    ..Nonproteolytic C. botulinum type E was not detected. Importantly, for QMRA and FSO, the construction of probability distributions will enable the frequency of packs containing particular levels of contamination to be determined...
  4. pmc Effects of carbon dioxide on growth of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, its ability to produce neurotoxin, and its transcriptome
    Ingrid Artin
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 76:1168-72. 2010
    ..Further research is needed to determine whether these are connected to neurotoxin formation or are merely growth phase associated...
  5. doi request reprint Detection limit of Clostridium botulinum spores in dried mushroom samples sourced from China
    Pradeep K Malakar
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom
    Int J Food Microbiol 166:72-6. 2013
    ..botulinum. Dried L. edodes contained <1500spores/kg of proteolytic C. botulinum and it was not possible to determine reliable detection limits for spores of non-proteolytic C. botulinum using the current detection protocol. ..
  6. pmc Genomic and physiological variability within Group II (non-proteolytic) Clostridium botulinum
    Sandra C Stringer
    Institute of Food Research IFR, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    BMC Genomics 14:333. 2013
    ..botulinum (14 type B, 24 type E and 5 type F). These results were compared with characteristics determined from physiological tests...
  7. pmc The type F6 neurotoxin gene cluster locus of group II clostridium botulinum has evolved by successive disruption of two different ancestral precursors
    Andrew T Carter
    Department of Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Genome Biol Evol 5:1032-7. 2013
    ..This degree of successive recombination at one hot spot is without precedent in C. botulinum, and it is also the first description of a Group II C. botulinum genome containing more than one neurotoxin gene sequence...
  8. pmc A predictive model that describes the effect of prolonged heating at 70 to 90 degrees C and subsequent incubation at refrigeration temperatures on growth from spores and toxigenesis by nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum in the presence of lysozyme
    P S Fernandez
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Laboratory, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 65:3449-57. 1999
    ..Predictions from the model provided a valid description of the data used to generate the model and agreed with observations made previously...
  9. pmc Rapid affinity immunochromatography column-based tests for sensitive detection of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins and Escherichia coli O157
    Jason Brunt
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 76:4143-50. 2010
    ..It has the potential to replace existing methods for presumptive detection of botulinum neurotoxin types A, B, E, and F and E. coli O157 in contaminated matrices without a requirement for preenrichment...
  10. pmc Historical and contemporary NaCl concentrations affect the duration and distribution of lag times from individual spores of nonproteolytic clostridium botulinum
    Martin D Webb
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:2118-27. 2007
    ....
  11. doi request reprint Modelling the growth of Clostridium perfringens during the cooling of bulk meat
    Y Le Marc
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    Int J Food Microbiol 128:41-50. 2008
    ..combase.cc. It is anticipated that the use of this model and Perfringens Predictor will contribute to a reduction in the food poisoning incidence associated with C. perfringens...
  12. doi request reprint Does proximity to neighbours affect germination of spores of non-proteolytic Clostridium botulinum?
    Martin D Webb
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    Food Microbiol 32:104-9. 2012
    ..The applied models provide a means to characterise, quantitatively, the effect of the total spore number on spore germination relative to the effect of proximity to neighbouring spores...
  13. pmc Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum
    Andrew T Carter
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich, UK
    BMC Genomics 10:115. 2009
    ..botulinum. The recent determination of the genome sequence of C. botulinum has allowed comparative genomic indexing using a DNA microarray...
  14. pmc Complete genome sequence of the proteolytic Clostridium botulinum type A5 (B3') strain H04402 065
    Andrew T Carter
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich, United Kingdom
    J Bacteriol 193:2351-2. 2011
    ..Here, we report the complete 3.9-Mb genome sequence and annotation of strain H04402 065, which was isolated from a botulism patient in the United Kingdom in 2004...
  15. ncbi request reprint Prevalence of Clostridium species and behaviour of Clostridium botulinum in gnocchi, a REPFED of italian origin
    M Del Torre
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, NR4 7UA, UK
    Int J Food Microbiol 96:115-31. 2004
    ..Providing sorbic acid (0.09% w/w) is included in the gnocchi, the safety margin would seem to be very large with respect to the foodborne botulism hazard...
  16. ncbi request reprint Probabilistic representation of the exposure of consumers to Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin in a minimally processed potato product
    G C Barker
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    Int J Food Microbiol 100:345-57. 2005
    ..The probabilistic analysis was built using Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) techniques...
  17. ncbi request reprint Use of a novel method to characterize the response of spores of non-proteolytic Clostridium botulinum types B, E and F to a wide range of germinants and conditions
    J Plowman
    Institute of Food Research, Colney, Norwich, UK
    J Appl Microbiol 92:681-94. 2002
    ..An automated system was used to study the effect of a large number of potential germinants, of temperature and pH, and aerobic and anaerobic conditions, on germination of spores of non-proteolytic Cl. botulinum types B, E and F...
  18. pmc Contrasting effects of heat treatment and incubation temperature on germination and outgrowth of individual spores of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum bacteria
    Sandra C Stringer
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 75:2712-9. 2009
    ..The results presented here combined with previous findings show that the stage of lag most affected, and the extent of any effect in terms of duration or variability, differs with both historical treatment and the growth conditions...
  19. doi request reprint Biology and genomic analysis of Clostridium botulinum
    Michael W Peck
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, UK
    Adv Microb Physiol 55:183-265, 320. 2009
    ..Factors affecting the regulation of neurotoxin formation also remain poorly understood, and will be the focus of much future research...
  20. ncbi request reprint Distribution of turbidity detection times produced by single cell-generated bacterial populations
    Aline Metris
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    J Microbiol Methods 55:821-7. 2003
    ..A linear relation dev(T) approximately T was observed between the detection times and their standard deviation. At slow growth, other sources of variability became increasingly significant...
  21. doi request reprint Lag time variability in individual spores of Clostridium botulinum
    S C Stringer
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    Food Microbiol 28:228-35. 2011
    ..The duration and variability of times for germination, outgrowth and first doubling depended on both the historic treatment of the spores and the prevailing growth conditions, and the stage of lag most affected was treatment dependant...
  22. doi request reprint Quantitative risk assessment for hazards that arise from non-proteolytic Clostridium botulinum in minimally processed chilled dairy-based foods
    P K Malakar
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    Food Microbiol 28:321-30. 2011
    ..Priorities for additional information to support risk assessments have been identified...
  23. ncbi request reprint The microbiological quality of hot water-washed broccoli florets and cut green beans
    S C Stringer
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich, UK
    J Appl Microbiol 102:41-50. 2007
    ..To determine the effect of hot water washing on the microbiological quality of cut broccoli florets and trimmed green beans...
  24. pmc Growth of and toxin production by nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum in cooked puréed vegetables at refrigeration temperatures
    F Carlin
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 62:3069-72. 1996
    ..The C. botulinum neurotoxin was detected within 3 to 5 days at 16 degrees C, 11 to 13 days at 10 degrees C, 10 to 34 days at 8 degrees C, and 17 to 20 days at 5 degrees C...
  25. pmc Growth from spores of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum in heat-treated vegetable juice
    S C Stringer
    Genetics and Microbiology Department, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Laboratory, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, NR4 7UA, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 65:2136-42. 1999
    ..We show for the first time that adding heat-treated vegetable juice to culture media can increase the number of heat-damaged spores of C. botulinum that can lead to colony formation...
  26. ncbi request reprint Redox potential affects the measured heat resistance of Escherichia coli O157:H7 independently of oxygen concentration
    S M George
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, UK
    Lett Appl Microbiol 27:313-7. 1998
    ..Sub-lethally heat-damaged cells regained their ability to grow in media of high redox potential at a similar rate whether the redox potential was increased by the addition of potassium ferricyanide, DPIP or oxygen...
  27. ncbi request reprint Germination and growth from spores: variability and uncertainty in the assessment of food borne hazards
    G C Barker
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    Int J Food Microbiol 100:67-76. 2005
    ..We conclude that Bayesian inference is a practical method for quantifying variability and hence a significant element in the development of quantitative risk assessments for hazards associated with spore forming bacteria...
  28. ncbi request reprint Effect of oxygen concentration and redox potential on recovery of sublethally heat-damaged cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes
    S M George
    Institute of Food Research, Colney, Norwich, UK
    J Appl Microbiol 84:903-9. 1998
    ..It is also possible that foods that are packed in air but with a low redox potential might allow the survival of heated cells, and thus the anticipated level of safety might not be achieved...
  29. pmc Inhibitory effect of combinations of heat treatment, pH, and sodium chloride on a growth from spores of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum at refrigeration temperature
    A F Graham
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 62:2664-8. 1996
    ..No growth occurred after spores were heated at 95 degrees C, but lysozyme improved recovery from spores heated at 85 and 90 degrees C...
  30. pmc The pattern of growth observed for Clostridium botulinum type A1 strain ATCC 19397 is influenced by nutritional status and quorum sensing: a modelling perspective
    Adaoha E C Ihekwaba
    Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    Pathog Dis 73:ftv084. 2015
    ..botulinum type A1 strain ATCC 19397. ..
  31. pmc Evolution of Chromosomal Clostridium botulinum Type E Neurotoxin Gene Clusters: Evidence Provided by Their Rare Plasmid-Borne Counterparts
    Andrew T Carter
    Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Genome Biol Evol 8:540-55. 2016
    ..botulinum Group II types B and F plasmids. Here, the absence of neurotoxin cassettes may be because recombination requires both a specific mechanism and specific target sequence, which are rarely found together. ..
  32. pmc Quantification of Nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum Spore Loads in Food Materials
    Gary C Barker
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, United KingdomRutgers, The State University of New Jersey
    Appl Environ Microbiol 82:1675-85. 2016
    ..Probability distributions for spore loads are represented in a convenient form that can be used for numerical analysis and risk assessments. ..
  33. pmc Functional characterisation of germinant receptors in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium sporogenes presents novel insights into spore germination systems
    Jason Brunt
    Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research IFR, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, Norfolk, United Kingdom
    PLoS Pathog 10:e1004382. 2014
    ..The suitability of using C. sporogenes as a substitute for C. botulinum in germination studies and food challenge tests is discussed. ..
  34. ncbi request reprint Modeling the prevalence of Bacillus cereus spores during the production of a cooked chilled vegetable product
    Pradeep K Malakar
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    J Food Prot 67:939-46. 2004
    ..The assessment produced a quantitative estimate of the prevalence of B. cereus spores in packets of vegetable puree at the end point of the manufacturing process...
  35. ncbi request reprint Investigation of the ability of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum to multiply and produce toxin in fresh Italian pasta
    M Del Torre
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Laboratory, Colney, UK Del
    J Food Prot 61:988-93. 1998
    ..When storage was at 20 degrees C, toxin was detected in the salmon-filled tortelli at day 30, in the meat and ricotta-spinach tortelli at day 50, but not in the artichoke-filled tortelli at day 50...
  36. pmc Three classes of plasmid (47-63 kb) carry the type B neurotoxin gene cluster of group II Clostridium botulinum
    Andrew T Carter
    Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Genome Biol Evol 6:2076-87. 2014
    ..botulinum type B4. ..
  37. pmc Lag phase is a distinct growth phase that prepares bacteria for exponential growth and involves transient metal accumulation
    Matthew D Rolfe
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, UK
    J Bacteriol 194:686-701. 2012
    ..The study of lag phase promises to identify the physiological and regulatory processes responsible for adaptation to new environments...
  38. pmc Network analysis of the transcriptional pattern of young and old cells of Escherichia coli during lag phase
    Carmen Pin
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    BMC Syst Biol 3:108. 2009
    ..Network science has been applied to analyse the transcriptional response, during lag phase, of bacterial cells starved previously in stationary phase for 1 day (young cells) and 16 days (old cells)...
  39. pmc Heterogeneity of times required for germination and outgrowth from single spores of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum
    Sandra C Stringer
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 71:4998-5003. 2005
    ..This information can make a substantial contribution to improved predictive modeling and better quantitative microbiological risk assessment...
  40. ncbi request reprint Principles of some novel rapid dipstick methods for detection and characterization of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli
    C F Aldus
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7UA, UK
    J Appl Microbiol 95:380-9. 2003
    ..coli O157:H7, making screening for all VTEC difficult. Here we describe development and testing of novel multi-analyte antibody-based dipstick methods for presumptive detection of VTEC cells and VTs, including non-O157 serotypes...
  41. pmc Apertures in the Clostridium sporogenes spore coat and exosporium align to facilitate emergence of the vegetative cell
    Jason Brunt
    Institute of Food Research IFR, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom Electronic address
    Food Microbiol 51:45-50. 2015
    ..7-1.0 μm) and coat shell. The formation of this aperture, its function and its alignment with the spore coat is discussed. ..
  42. pmc New Elements To Consider When Modeling the Hazards Associated with Botulinum Neurotoxin in Food
    Adaoha E C Ihekwaba
    Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, United Kingdom
    J Bacteriol 198:204-11. 2015
    ..Subsequently, it outlines how the established form of modeling could be extended to include these new elements. Ultimately, this can offer further contributions to risk assessments to support food safety decision making. ..
  43. pmc Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II
    Andrew T Carter
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, NR4 7UA, UK
    Res Microbiol 166:303-17. 2015
    ..botulinum Groups I and II are explored. Specific examples of botulinum neurotoxin genes are chosen for an in-depth discussion of neurotoxin gene evolution. The most recent cases of foodborne botulism are summarised. ..
  44. ncbi request reprint Variability in spore germination response by strains of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum types A, B and F
    F Alberto
    UMR 408 Sécurité et qualité des produits d origine végétale, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Domaine Saint Paul, Avignon, France
    Lett Appl Microbiol 36:41-5. 2003
    ..The objective of the study was to evaluate the variability of germination response of 10 strains of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum...