Brian D Robertson

Summary

Affiliation: Imperial College
Country: UK

Publications

  1. pmc Cell division site placement and asymmetric growth in mycobacteria
    Graham Joyce
    MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Department of Medicine, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e44582. 2012
  2. pmc Tetracycline-inducible gene regulation in mycobacteria
    Marian C J Blokpoel
    Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, Imperial College London South Kensington campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Nucleic Acids Res 33:e22. 2005
  3. doi Detection and treatment of subclinical tuberculosis
    Brian D Robertson
    Rapporteur, Imperial College London, MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Flowers Building, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Tuberculosis (Edinb) 92:447-52. 2012
  4. pmc Rapid measurement of antituberculosis drug activity in vitro and in macrophages using bioluminescence
    Nuria Andreu
    Microbiology, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ, UK
    J Antimicrob Chemother 67:404-14. 2012
  5. pmc Improved mycobacterial tetracycline inducible vectors
    Kerstin J Williams
    Centre for Molecular Medicine and Infection, Room 3 40, Flowers Building, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Plasmid 64:69-73. 2010
  6. pmc Rapid in vivo assessment of drug efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis using an improved firefly luciferase
    Nuria Andreu
    MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK
    J Antimicrob Chemother 68:2118-27. 2013
  7. pmc Alternative luciferase for monitoring bacterial cells under adverse conditions
    Siouxsie Wiles
    Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 71:3427-32. 2005
  8. pmc Deciphering the response of Mycobacterium smegmatis to nitrogen stress using bipartite active modules
    Kerstin J Williams
    Department of Medicine, MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    BMC Genomics 14:436. 2013
  9. ncbi The OtsAB pathway is essential for trehalose biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    Helen N Murphy
    Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    J Biol Chem 280:14524-9. 2005
  10. pmc Adenylylation of mycobacterial Glnk (PII) protein is induced by nitrogen limitation
    Kerstin J Williams
    MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Tuberculosis (Edinb) 93:198-206. 2013

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications31

  1. pmc Cell division site placement and asymmetric growth in mycobacteria
    Graham Joyce
    MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Department of Medicine, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 7:e44582. 2012
    ..We also show that the division site is not selected at a characteristic cell length, suggesting this is not an important cue during the mycobacterial cell cycle...
  2. pmc Tetracycline-inducible gene regulation in mycobacteria
    Marian C J Blokpoel
    Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, Imperial College London South Kensington campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Nucleic Acids Res 33:e22. 2005
    ..These results demonstrate the potential of this tetracycline-regulated system for the manipulation of mycobacterial gene expression inside and outside cells...
  3. doi Detection and treatment of subclinical tuberculosis
    Brian D Robertson
    Rapporteur, Imperial College London, MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Flowers Building, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Tuberculosis (Edinb) 92:447-52. 2012
    ..The Working Group met in Cape Town on 26th February 2012, following presentation of results from the GC11 Grand Challenges in Global Health project to discover drugs for latent TB...
  4. pmc Rapid measurement of antituberculosis drug activity in vitro and in macrophages using bioluminescence
    Nuria Andreu
    Microbiology, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ, UK
    J Antimicrob Chemother 67:404-14. 2012
    ..The aim of this work was to validate and standardize the use of luminescent M. tuberculosis strains to test the activity of antibacterial drugs in vitro and inside macrophages in a 96-well format...
  5. pmc Improved mycobacterial tetracycline inducible vectors
    Kerstin J Williams
    Centre for Molecular Medicine and Infection, Room 3 40, Flowers Building, Division of Infectious Diseases, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Plasmid 64:69-73. 2010
    ..The construction of these improved mycobacterial vectors will prove extremely useful for genetic studies...
  6. pmc Rapid in vivo assessment of drug efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis using an improved firefly luciferase
    Nuria Andreu
    MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK
    J Antimicrob Chemother 68:2118-27. 2013
    ..The objective of this work was to develop a bioluminescence-based mouse model of tuberculosis to assess antibiotic efficacy against M. tuberculosis in vivo...
  7. pmc Alternative luciferase for monitoring bacterial cells under adverse conditions
    Siouxsie Wiles
    Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 71:3427-32. 2005
    ..The work presented here demonstrated the utility of the copepod luciferase bioluminescent reporter as an alternative to bacterial luciferase, particularly for monitoring responses to environmental stress stimuli...
  8. pmc Deciphering the response of Mycobacterium smegmatis to nitrogen stress using bipartite active modules
    Kerstin J Williams
    Department of Medicine, MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    BMC Genomics 14:436. 2013
    ..Although essential for growth, few nitrogen metabolism genes have been identified or fully characterised in mycobacteria and nitrogen stress survival mechanisms are unknown...
  9. ncbi The OtsAB pathway is essential for trehalose biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    Helen N Murphy
    Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    J Biol Chem 280:14524-9. 2005
    ....
  10. pmc Adenylylation of mycobacterial Glnk (PII) protein is induced by nitrogen limitation
    Kerstin J Williams
    MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Tuberculosis (Edinb) 93:198-206. 2013
    ..Further analysis shows that in contrast to E. coli, GlnK (PII) adenylylation in M. tuberculosis does not regulate GS adenylylation, nor does it mediate the transcriptomic response to nitrogen limitation...
  11. pmc Pathways of IL-1β secretion by macrophages infected with clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains
    Nitya Krishnan
    MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Tuberculosis (Edinb) 93:538-47. 2013
    ..Taken together, these findings demonstrate that clinical strains of M. tuberculosis employ a unique caspase-1 independent pathway to stimulate IL-1β secretion from macrophages. ..
  12. pmc The Mycobacterium tuberculosis β-oxidation genes echA5 and fadB3 are dispensable for growth in vitro and in vivo
    Kerstin J Williams
    Centre for Molecular Medicine and Infection, Department of Medicine, Flowers Building, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Tuberculosis (Edinb) 91:549-55. 2011
    ..Macrophage survival and mouse infection studies also showed no significant difference between the mutant and parent strains. Therefore, we conclude that these genes are dispensable for growth in vitro and in vivo...
  13. ncbi The stress-responsive chaperone alpha-crystallin 2 is required for pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    Graham R Stewart
    Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Mol Microbiol 55:1127-37. 2005
    ..These findings demonstrate that both alpha-crystallins contribute to persistent infection with M. tuberculosis and suggest that manipulation of acr expression can influence the host response to infection...
  14. pmc Genome wide analysis of the complete GlnR nitrogen-response regulon in Mycobacterium smegmatis
    Victoria A Jenkins
    MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    BMC Genomics 14:301. 2013
    ..However, to date only ten genes have been shown to be in the GlnR regulon, a vastly reduced number compared to other organisms...
  15. doi Free glucosylglycerate is a novel marker of nitrogen stress in Mycobacterium smegmatis
    Volker Behrends
    Biomolecular Medicine, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Department of Medicine, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    J Proteome Res 11:3888-96. 2012
    ..Hence, GGA could contribute to the fitness of mycobacteria under nitrogen limitation...
  16. pmc Deciphering the metabolic response of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to nitrogen stress
    Kerstin J Williams
    MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK
    Mol Microbiol 97:1142-57. 2015
    ..tuberculosis to that in non-pathogenic mycobacteria, controlling genes involved in nitric oxide detoxification and intracellular survival instead of genes involved in nitrogen scavenging. ..
  17. ncbi Analysis of the function of mycobacterial DnaJ proteins by overexpression and microarray profiling
    Graham R Stewart
    Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, Flowers Building, South Kensington Campus, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ, UK
    Tuberculosis (Edinb) 84:180-7. 2004
    ..Overexpression in combination with microarray profiling provides a complementary approach to gene deletion for exploring the function of essential genes in M. tuberculosis...
  18. pmc Sensitive detection of gene expression in mycobacteria under replicating and non-replicating conditions using optimized far-red reporters
    Paul Carroll
    Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 5:e9823. 2010
    ....
  19. ncbi Visualization of microarray results to assist interpretation
    Irene Papatheodorou
    Department of Computing, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ, UK
    Tuberculosis (Edinb) 84:275-81. 2004
    ..The GeneGraph project can be accessed at: zebrafish.doc.ic.ac.uk..
  20. pmc Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineage influences innate immune response and virulence and is associated with distinct cell envelope lipid profiles
    Nitya Krishnan
    Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    PLoS ONE 6:e23870. 2011
    ..tuberculosis and host are determined by the lineage of the infecting strain; but we were unable to show these differences are driven by lineage-specific cell-surface expressed lipids...
  21. doi Aspartate D48 is essential for the GlnR-mediated transcriptional response to nitrogen limitation in Mycobacterium smegmatis
    Victoria A Jenkins
    Department of Medicine, Centre for Molecular Medicine and Infection, Imperial College London, London, UK
    FEMS Microbiol Lett 330:38-45. 2012
    ..We therefore demonstrate that the GlnR aspartate (D48) residue is essential for its function as a nitrogen-stress transcriptional response regulator in M. smegmatis...
  22. ncbi Unusual features of the cell cycle in mycobacteria: polar-restricted growth and the snapping-model of cell division
    Niren R Thanky
    Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, 3 41 Flowers Building, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Tuberculosis (Edinb) 87:231-6. 2007
    ..The mechanisms that maintain the shape of mycobacteria and that identify the mid-point for cell division remain to be determined...
  23. pmc Optimisation of bioluminescent reporters for use with mycobacteria
    Nuria Andreu
    Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK
    PLoS ONE 5:e10777. 2010
    ..Despite the extensive use of luminescent reporters in mycobacteria, the resultant luminescent strains have not been fully applied to BLI...
  24. ncbi Systems biology and its impact on anti-infective drug development
    Michael P Stumpf
    Centre for Integrative Systems Biology at Imperial College CISBIC, Division of Molecular Biosciences, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Prog Drug Res 64:1, 3-20. 2007
    ....
  25. doi Cell electrospinning: an in vitro and in vivo study
    Samantha L Sampson
    MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Flowers Building, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK
    Small 10:78-82. 2014
    ..The functional biological architectures generated will be useful in both the laboratory and the clinic. ..
  26. doi The mechanisms and consequences of the extra-pulmonary dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    Nitya Krishnan
    Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, Division of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Tuberculosis (Edinb) 90:361-6. 2010
    ..Further understanding of the pathways, mechanisms and consequences of M. tuberculosis dissemination could have a major impact in designing novel vaccines and therapeutic strategies...
  27. doi In vitro and in vivo interrogation of bio-sprayed cells
    Nuria Andreu
    Centre for Molecular Medicine and Infection, Department of Medicine, Flowers Building, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
    Small 8:2495-500. 2012
    ..Bio-electrosprays and aerodynamically assisted bio-jets, are leading approaches that have been demonstrated as having far-reaching ramifications for regenerative biology and medicine...
  28. doi Unnatural amino acid analogues of membrane-active helical peptides with anti-mycobacterial activity and improved stability
    Jasmeet Singh Khara
    Department of Pharmacy, National University of Singapore, 18 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117543, Singapore Section of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, St Mary s Campus, Imperial College London, London W2 1PG, UK MRC Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    J Antimicrob Chemother 71:2181-91. 2016
    ..We therefore systematically evaluated unnatural amino acid-modified peptides to design analogues with enhanced anti-mycobacterial activities...
  29. pmc A modified agar pad method for mycobacterial live-cell imaging
    Graham Joyce
    Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, Imperial College, London, SW7 2AZ, UK
    BMC Res Notes 4:73. 2011
    ....
  30. ncbi Tuberculosis: a problem with persistence
    Graham R Stewart
    Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    Nat Rev Microbiol 1:97-105. 2003
    ..tuberculosis dates back to the first half of the last century. Recent advances in microbial genetics and host immunity provide an opportunity for renewed investigation of this persistent threat to human health...
  31. doi Bioluminescent monitoring of in vivo colonization and clearance dynamics by light-emitting bacteria
    Siouxsie Wiles
    Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunity, Imperial College London, London, UK
    Methods Mol Biol 574:137-53. 2009
    ..Here we describe the protocols required to monitor colonization and clearance dynamics using bioluminescent bacteria that are lux-, luc-, or Gluc-positive...