M P Weijenberg

Summary

Affiliation: Maastricht University
Country: The Netherlands

Publications

  1. pmc Dietary fat and risk of colon and rectal cancer with aberrant MLH1 expression, APC or KRAS genes
    Matty P Weijenberg
    Department of Epidemiology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, P O Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Cancer Causes Control 18:865-79. 2007
  2. pmc Meat consumption and K-ras mutations in sporadic colon and rectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study
    M Brink
    Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht NUTRIM, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Br J Cancer 92:1310-20. 2005
  3. pmc Mutations in APC, CTNNB1 and K-ras genes and expression of hMLH1 in sporadic colorectal carcinomas from the Netherlands Cohort Study
    Margreet Lüchtenborg
    Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    BMC Cancer 5:160. 2005
  4. ncbi request reprint Dietary glycemic load, glycemic index and colorectal cancer risk: results from the Netherlands Cohort Study
    Matty P Weijenberg
    Department of Epidemiology, Research Institute Growth and Development GROW, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Int J Cancer 122:620-9. 2008
  5. doi request reprint Cigarette smoking and KRAS oncogene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer: results from the Netherlands Cohort Study
    M P Weijenberg
    GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, University Maastricht, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Mutat Res 652:54-64. 2008
  6. doi request reprint MGMT and MLH1 promoter methylation versus APC, KRAS and BRAF gene mutations in colorectal cancer: indications for distinct pathways and sequence of events
    S de Vogel
    Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Ann Oncol 20:1216-22. 2009
  7. ncbi request reprint Meat and fish consumption, APC gene mutations and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer: a prospective cohort study (The Netherlands)
    Margreet Lüchtenborg
    Department of Epidemiology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht NUTRIM, Maastricht University, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Cancer Causes Control 16:1041-54. 2005
  8. ncbi request reprint Effects of dietary folate and alcohol intake on promoter methylation in sporadic colorectal cancer: the Netherlands cohort study on diet and cancer
    Manon van Engeland
    The Research Institute GROW, Department of Pathology, University Maastricht, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Cancer Res 63:3133-7. 2003
  9. ncbi request reprint Dietary folate intake and k-ras mutations in sporadic colon and rectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study
    Mirian Brink
    Research Institute Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht NUTRIM, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Int J Cancer 114:824-30. 2005
  10. doi request reprint A novel classification of colorectal tumors based on microsatellite instability, the CpG island methylator phenotype and chromosomal instability: implications for prognosis
    C C J M Simons
    Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Ann Oncol 24:2048-56. 2013

Detail Information

Publications48

  1. pmc Dietary fat and risk of colon and rectal cancer with aberrant MLH1 expression, APC or KRAS genes
    Matty P Weijenberg
    Department of Epidemiology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, P O Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Cancer Causes Control 18:865-79. 2007
    ....
  2. pmc Meat consumption and K-ras mutations in sporadic colon and rectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study
    M Brink
    Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht NUTRIM, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Br J Cancer 92:1310-20. 2005
    ....
  3. pmc Mutations in APC, CTNNB1 and K-ras genes and expression of hMLH1 in sporadic colorectal carcinomas from the Netherlands Cohort Study
    Margreet Lüchtenborg
    Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    BMC Cancer 5:160. 2005
    ..A smaller proportion of cancers shows mismatch repair deficiency. The aim of this study was to analyse the co-occurrence of these genetic alterations in relation to tumour and patient characteristics...
  4. ncbi request reprint Dietary glycemic load, glycemic index and colorectal cancer risk: results from the Netherlands Cohort Study
    Matty P Weijenberg
    Department of Epidemiology, Research Institute Growth and Development GROW, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Int J Cancer 122:620-9. 2008
    ..03). Overall, our findings do not support the hypothesis that a diet with a high glycemic load or index is associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer...
  5. doi request reprint Cigarette smoking and KRAS oncogene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer: results from the Netherlands Cohort Study
    M P Weijenberg
    GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, University Maastricht, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Mutat Res 652:54-64. 2008
    ..Some smoking characteristics, i.e. being an ex-smoker, frequency and inhalation, may be associated with risk for colorectal cancer characterized by the wild-type KRAS gene, especially in men...
  6. doi request reprint MGMT and MLH1 promoter methylation versus APC, KRAS and BRAF gene mutations in colorectal cancer: indications for distinct pathways and sequence of events
    S de Vogel
    Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Ann Oncol 20:1216-22. 2009
    ....
  7. ncbi request reprint Meat and fish consumption, APC gene mutations and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer: a prospective cohort study (The Netherlands)
    Margreet Lüchtenborg
    Department of Epidemiology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht NUTRIM, Maastricht University, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Cancer Causes Control 16:1041-54. 2005
    ..The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between meat and fish consumption and APC mutation status and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer...
  8. ncbi request reprint Effects of dietary folate and alcohol intake on promoter methylation in sporadic colorectal cancer: the Netherlands cohort study on diet and cancer
    Manon van Engeland
    The Research Institute GROW, Department of Pathology, University Maastricht, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Cancer Res 63:3133-7. 2003
    ..085). Despite the size limitations of this study, these data suggest that folate and alcohol intake may be associated with changes in promoter hypermethylation in CRC...
  9. ncbi request reprint Dietary folate intake and k-ras mutations in sporadic colon and rectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study
    Mirian Brink
    Research Institute Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht NUTRIM, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Int J Cancer 114:824-30. 2005
    ..09), but inversely associated with G>A transitions (RR = 0.08, 95% CI = 0.01-0.53). Our data suggest that the effect of folate on rectal cancer risk is different for men and women and depends on the K-ras mutation status of the tumor...
  10. doi request reprint A novel classification of colorectal tumors based on microsatellite instability, the CpG island methylator phenotype and chromosomal instability: implications for prognosis
    C C J M Simons
    Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Ann Oncol 24:2048-56. 2013
    ....
  11. ncbi request reprint Dietary factors, genetic susceptibility and somatic mutations in colorectal cancer: a prospective study
    M P Weijenberg
    Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
    IARC Sci Publ 156:503-4. 2002
  12. pmc Magnesium intake and colorectal cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study
    P A van den Brandt
    Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Br J Cancer 96:510-3. 2007
    ..05 and 0.02, respectively). Although an overall protective effect was not afforded, our results suggest an effect of magnesium in overweight subjects, possibly through decreasing insulin resistance...
  13. ncbi request reprint Cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer: APC mutations, hMLH1 expression, and GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms
    Margreet Lüchtenborg
    Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht, Department of Epidemiology, Universiteit Maastricht, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Am J Epidemiol 161:806-15. 2005
    ..These results indicate that cigarette smoking is associated with risk of colorectal cancer, and this association may depend on molecular characteristics of the tumor as defined by APC mutation and hMLH1 expression status...
  14. ncbi request reprint Fruits, vegetables, and hMLH1 protein-deficient and -proficient colon cancer: The Netherlands cohort study
    Petra A Wark
    Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, P O Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 14:1619-25. 2005
    ..Animal and in vitro studies suggest that fruits, vegetables, folate, and antioxidants are associated with colonic expression of mismatch repair genes...
  15. ncbi request reprint Fat and K-ras mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study
    Mirian Brink
    Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Carcinogenesis 25:1619-28. 2004
    ..A high intake of polyunsaturated fat, in particular linoleic acid, may be an important dietary risk factor for K-ras mutated colon tumours, possibly by generating G > A transitions or G > T or G > C transversions in the K-ras oncogene...
  16. doi request reprint Genetic variants of methyl metabolizing enzymes and epigenetic regulators: associations with promoter CpG island hypermethylation in colorectal cancer
    Stefan de Vogel
    Departments of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 18:3086-96. 2009
    ..The incomplete overlap between CIMP, MLH1 hypermethylation, and microsatellite instability indicates that these related "methylation phenotypes" may not be similar and should be investigated separately...
  17. doi request reprint Body size, physical activity, genetic variants in the insulin-like growth factor pathway and colorectal cancer risk
    C C J M Simons
    Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology and Department of Toxicology, NUTRIM School for Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands and Department of Pathology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Carcinogenesis 36:971-81. 2015
    ..Almost no interactions tested significant. To conclude, a larger body size was a CRC risk factor in men in the presence of an accumulation of unfavorable alleles in IGF-related genes, but interactions were generally nonsignificant...
  18. ncbi request reprint Interaction between smoking, GSTM1 deletion and colorectal cancer: results from the GSEC study
    K M Smits
    University of Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Biomarkers 8:299-310. 2003
    ..007, p=0.97). Our findings do not support an association between the GSTM1 null genotype and colorectal cancer. In addition, we did not find any modification of the smoking-induced colorectal cancer risk by GSTM1 genotype..
  19. ncbi request reprint Elevated risk of cancer of the urinary tract for alcohol drinkers: a meta-analysis
    M P Zeegers
    Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
    Cancer Causes Control 10:445-51. 1999
    ..The purpose of this meta-analysis is to summarize and quantify this relationship with more statistical power and to perform a sensitivity analysis on the study characteristics...
  20. doi request reprint Self-reported clothing size as a proxy measure for body size
    Laura A E Hughes
    Department of Epidemiology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology GROW, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Epidemiology 20:673-6. 2009
    ..Few studies have considered the potential utility of clothing size as a predictor of diseases associated with body weight...
  21. doi request reprint Associations of dietary methyl donor intake with MLH1 promoter hypermethylation and related molecular phenotypes in sporadic colorectal cancer
    Stefan de Vogel
    Department of Epidemiology, GROW, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Carcinogenesis 29:1765-73. 2008
    ....
  22. ncbi request reprint Higher dietary flavone, flavonol, and catechin intakes are associated with less of an increase in BMI over time in women: a longitudinal analysis from the Netherlands Cohort Study
    Laura A E Hughes
    Department of Epidemiology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands NUTRIM
    Am J Clin Nutr 88:1341-52. 2008
    ..Dietary flavonoids are suggested to have antiobesity effects. Prospective evidence of an association between flavonoids and body mass index (BMI) is lacking in general populations...
  23. doi request reprint Dietary folate, methionine, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6 and risk of sporadic colorectal cancer
    Stefan de Vogel
    Departments of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    J Nutr 138:2372-8. 2008
    ..This is the 2nd prospective cohort study in which vitamin B-6 intake was associated with increased risk of rectal tumors in women, which might suggest that this vitamin enhances rectal cancer in women...
  24. doi request reprint Bowel movement and constipation frequencies and the risk of colorectal cancer among men in the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer
    Colinda C J M Simons
    Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, MaastrichtUniversity, P O Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Am J Epidemiol 172:1404-14. 2010
    ..Interactions with dietary fiber intake were not significant. In this study, frequent bowel movements were associated with an increased risk of rectal cancer in men, and constipation was associated with a decreased risk...
  25. doi request reprint Dietary flavonol, flavone and catechin intake and risk of colorectal cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study
    Colinda C J M Simons
    Department of Epidemiology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology GROW, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Int J Cancer 125:2945-52. 2009
    ..Dietary catechin intake may be associated with a decreased rectal cancer risk in overweight men. Dietary flavonol and catechin intake may be associated with a decreased colorectal cancer risk in normal weight women...
  26. doi request reprint Childhood and adolescent energy restriction and subsequent colorectal cancer risk: results from the Netherlands Cohort Study
    Laura A E Hughes
    Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Int J Epidemiol 39:1333-44. 2010
    ..Energy restriction during childhood and adolescence is suggested to lower colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. We investigated this in the Netherlands Cohort Study...
  27. ncbi request reprint Alcohol consumption and distinct molecular pathways to colorectal cancer
    Brenda W C Bongaerts
    Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht NUTRIM, Department of Epidemiology, University Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Br J Nutr 97:430-4. 2007
    ..In conclusion, our results indicate that a daily alcohol consumption of >or=30 g is associated with an increase in risk of CRC, independent of the presence or absence of the studied characteristics of different aetiological pathways...
  28. doi request reprint Alcohol consumption, type of alcoholic beverage and risk of colorectal cancer at specific subsites
    Brenda W C Bongaerts
    Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Int J Cancer 123:2411-7. 2008
    ..Also, cancer risk may vary according to anatomical subsite...
  29. ncbi request reprint K-ras oncogene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study
    Mirian Brink
    Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht NUTRIM, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, The Netherlands
    Carcinogenesis 24:703-10. 2003
    ....
  30. ncbi request reprint Alcohol and the risk of colon and rectal cancer with mutations in the K-ras gene
    Brenda W C Bongaerts
    Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht NUTRIM, Department of Epidemiology, University Maastricht, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Alcohol 38:147-54. 2006
    ..In conclusion, alcohol does not seem to be involved in predisposing to CRC through mutations in the K-ras gene, and specifically beer consumption is not associated with colon and rectal tumors harboring a G-->A mutation...
  31. ncbi request reprint APC mutations in sporadic colorectal carcinomas from The Netherlands Cohort Study
    Margreet Lüchtenborg
    Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht, Department of Epidemiology, University Maastricht, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Carcinogenesis 25:1219-26. 2004
    ..009 and P = 0.045, respectively). Differences in occurrence of truncating mutations with regard to tumour sub-localization suggest a different aetiology of tumourigenesis in colon and rectum...
  32. ncbi request reprint Dietary folate and APC mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer
    Stefan de Vogel
    Research Institute Growth and Development GROW, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    J Nutr 136:3015-21. 2006
    ..These opposite results may indicate that folate enhances colorectal carcinogenesis through a distinct APC mutated pathway...
  33. doi request reprint Consumption of dietary fat and meat and risk of ovarian cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study
    Anne M J Gilsing
    Department of Epidemiology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Am J Clin Nutr 93:118-26. 2011
    ..Evidence that links dietary factors to ovarian cancer is conflicting, but several epidemiologic studies suggested that consumption of dietary fat and meat may increase risk of ovarian cancer...
  34. doi request reprint Vegetarianism, low meat consumption and the risk of lung, postmenopausal breast and prostate cancer in a population-based cohort study
    A M J Gilsing
    Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Eur J Clin Nutr 70:723-9. 2016
    ..Moreover, little is known about the explanatory role of (non-) dietary factors associated with these diets...
  35. ncbi request reprint K-ras mutations and RASSF1A promoter methylation in colorectal cancer
    Manon van Engeland
    Department of Pathology, University Maastricht, P O Box 616 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Oncogene 21:3792-5. 2002
    ..These data show that the majority of the studied CRCs with K-ras mutations lack RASSF1A promoter methylation, an event which occurs predominantly in K-ras wild-type CRCs (P=0.023, Chi-square test)...
  36. pmc Early life exposure to famine and colorectal cancer risk: a role for epigenetic mechanisms
    Laura A E Hughes
    Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    PLoS ONE 4:e7951. 2009
    ..Within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, we investigated the association between early life energy restriction and risk of subsequent CRC characterized by the (promoter) CpG island methylation phenotype (CIMP)...
  37. ncbi request reprint Integrated analysis of chromosomal, microsatellite and epigenetic instability in colorectal cancer identifies specific associations between promoter methylation of pivotal tumour suppressor and DNA repair genes and specific chromosomal alterations
    Sarah Derks
    Department of Pathology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, 6200 MD, The Netherlands
    Carcinogenesis 29:434-9. 2008
    ..Therefore, we conclude that promoter methylation of pivotal tumour suppressor and DNA repair genes is associated with specific patterns of chromosomal changes in CRC, which are different from methylation patterns in MSI tumours...
  38. doi request reprint GATA4 and GATA5 are potential tumor suppressors and biomarkers in colorectal cancer
    Debby M E I Hellebrekers
    Departments of Pathology and Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Clin Cancer Res 15:3990-7. 2009
    ..Here, we evaluated GATA4/5 promoter methylation as potential biomarkers for noninvasive colorectal cancer detection, and investigated the role of GATA4/5 in colorectal cancer...
  39. doi request reprint N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 4 (NDRG4): a candidate tumor suppressor gene and potential biomarker for colorectal cancer
    Veerle Melotte
    Department of Pathology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands
    J Natl Cancer Inst 101:916-27. 2009
    ..Here we examined the role of N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 4 (NDRG4) as a novel tumor suppressor and biomarker in colorectal cancer...
  40. pmc The impact of heat waves and cold spells on mortality rates in the Dutch population
    M M Huynen
    International Centre for Integrative Studies, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Environ Health Perspect 109:463-70. 2001
    ..The results concerning the forward displacement of deaths due to heat waves were not conclusive. We found no cold-induced forward displacement of deaths...
  41. ncbi request reprint Association of metabolic gene polymorphisms with tobacco consumption in healthy controls
    Kim M Smits
    University Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Int J Cancer 110:266-70. 2004
    ..No association between polymorphisms in the genes studied and tobacco consumption was observed; therefore, no effect of these genes on smoking behavior should be expected...
  42. pmc Promoter methylation precedes chromosomal alterations in colorectal cancer development
    Sarah Derks
    Department of Pathology, Research Institute GROW, University Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Cell Oncol 28:247-57. 2006
    ..Colorectal cancers are characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations. This study aimed to explore the timing of promoter methylation and relationship with mutations and chromosomal alterations in colorectal carcinogenesis...
  43. doi request reprint Fluid intake and colorectal cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study
    Colinda C J M Simons
    GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Nutr Cancer 62:307-21. 2010
    ..There was no evidence that fiber intake modified associations. Of the specific beverages, coffee intake was positively associated with rectal cancer risk in men...
  44. doi request reprint Pharmacoepigenomics in colorectal cancer: a step forward in predicting prognosis and treatment response
    Kim M Smits
    Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
    Pharmacogenomics 9:1903-16. 2008
    ..This review describes the current knowledge on the prognostic and predictive value of epigenetic markers in colorectal cancer...
  45. ncbi request reprint CHFR promoter hypermethylation in colon cancer correlates with the microsatellite instability phenotype
    Johann C Brandes
    Cancer Biology Program, Department of Oncology, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA
    Carcinogenesis 26:1152-6. 2005
    ....
  46. ncbi request reprint Heme and chlorophyll intake and risk of colorectal cancer in the Netherlands cohort study
    Helena F Balder
    Department Food and Chemical Risk Analysis, TNO Quality of Life, Zeist, The Netherlands
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 15:717-25. 2006
    ..Heme is the pro-oxidant, iron-containing porphyrin pigment of meat and its content depends on the type of meat. Chlorophyll from green vegetables might modify this association...
  47. ncbi request reprint Diet, lifestyle and risk of K-ras mutation-positive and -negative colorectal adenomas
    Petra A Wark
    Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
    Int J Cancer 119:398-405. 2006
    ..In conclusion, dietary and lifestyle factors may influence risk of K-ras+ and K-ras- adenomas differently. However, epidemiological literature on diet, lifestyle and colorectal K-ras mutations is inconsistent...
  48. ncbi request reprint A genomic screen for genes upregulated by demethylation and histone deacetylase inhibition in human colorectal cancer
    Hiromu Suzuki
    The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1650 Orleans Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA
    Nat Genet 31:141-9. 2002
    ....