Andrew T Carter

Summary

Publications

  1. doi request reprint Evolution of Chromosomal Clostridium botulinum Type E Neurotoxin Gene Clusters: Evidence Provided by Their Rare Plasmid-Borne Counterparts
    Andrew T Carter
    Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Genome Biol Evol 8:540-55. 2016
  2. pmc Three classes of plasmid (47-63 kb) carry the type B neurotoxin gene cluster of group II Clostridium botulinum
    Andrew T Carter
    Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Genome Biol Evol 6:2076-87. 2014
  3. pmc Genomic and physiological variability within Group II (non-proteolytic) Clostridium botulinum
    Sandra C Stringer
    Institute of Food Research IFR, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    BMC Genomics 14:333. 2013
  4. pmc The type F6 neurotoxin gene cluster locus of group II clostridium botulinum has evolved by successive disruption of two different ancestral precursors
    Andrew T Carter
    Department of Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Genome Biol Evol 5:1032-7. 2013
  5. pmc Effects of carbon dioxide on growth of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, its ability to produce neurotoxin, and its transcriptome
    Ingrid Artin
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 76:1168-72. 2010
  6. doi request reprint Clostridium botulinum in the post-genomic era
    Michael W Peck
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, NR4 7UA, UK
    Food Microbiol 28:183-91. 2011
  7. pmc Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum
    Andrew T Carter
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich, UK
    BMC Genomics 10:115. 2009
  8. pmc Complete genome sequence of the proteolytic Clostridium botulinum type A5 (B3') strain H04402 065
    Andrew T Carter
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich, United Kingdom
    J Bacteriol 193:2351-2. 2011
  9. pmc Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II
    Andrew T Carter
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, NR4 7UA, UK
    Res Microbiol 166:303-17. 2015
  10. pmc Functional characterisation of germinant receptors in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium sporogenes presents novel insights into spore germination systems
    Jason Brunt
    Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research IFR, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, Norfolk, United Kingdom
    PLoS Pathog 10:e1004382. 2014

Detail Information

Publications10

  1. doi request reprint Evolution of Chromosomal Clostridium botulinum Type E Neurotoxin Gene Clusters: Evidence Provided by Their Rare Plasmid-Borne Counterparts
    Andrew T Carter
    Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Genome Biol Evol 8:540-55. 2016
    ..botulinum Group II types B and F plasmids. Here, the absence of neurotoxin cassettes may be because recombination requires both a specific mechanism and specific target sequence, which are rarely found together. ..
  2. pmc Three classes of plasmid (47-63 kb) carry the type B neurotoxin gene cluster of group II Clostridium botulinum
    Andrew T Carter
    Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Genome Biol Evol 6:2076-87. 2014
    ..botulinum type B4. ..
  3. pmc Genomic and physiological variability within Group II (non-proteolytic) Clostridium botulinum
    Sandra C Stringer
    Institute of Food Research IFR, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK
    BMC Genomics 14:333. 2013
    ..botulinum (14 type B, 24 type E and 5 type F). These results were compared with characteristics determined from physiological tests...
  4. pmc The type F6 neurotoxin gene cluster locus of group II clostridium botulinum has evolved by successive disruption of two different ancestral precursors
    Andrew T Carter
    Department of Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Genome Biol Evol 5:1032-7. 2013
    ..This degree of successive recombination at one hot spot is without precedent in C. botulinum, and it is also the first description of a Group II C. botulinum genome containing more than one neurotoxin gene sequence...
  5. pmc Effects of carbon dioxide on growth of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, its ability to produce neurotoxin, and its transcriptome
    Ingrid Artin
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich, United Kingdom
    Appl Environ Microbiol 76:1168-72. 2010
    ..Further research is needed to determine whether these are connected to neurotoxin formation or are merely growth phase associated...
  6. doi request reprint Clostridium botulinum in the post-genomic era
    Michael W Peck
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, NR4 7UA, UK
    Food Microbiol 28:183-91. 2011
    ..To better control the botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is important to understand spore resistance mechanisms, and the physiological processes involved in germination and lag phase during recovery from this dormant state...
  7. pmc Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum
    Andrew T Carter
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich, UK
    BMC Genomics 10:115. 2009
    ..botulinum. The recent determination of the genome sequence of C. botulinum has allowed comparative genomic indexing using a DNA microarray...
  8. pmc Complete genome sequence of the proteolytic Clostridium botulinum type A5 (B3') strain H04402 065
    Andrew T Carter
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich, United Kingdom
    J Bacteriol 193:2351-2. 2011
    ..Here, we report the complete 3.9-Mb genome sequence and annotation of strain H04402 065, which was isolated from a botulism patient in the United Kingdom in 2004...
  9. pmc Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II
    Andrew T Carter
    Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, NR4 7UA, UK
    Res Microbiol 166:303-17. 2015
    ..botulinum Groups I and II are explored. Specific examples of botulinum neurotoxin genes are chosen for an in-depth discussion of neurotoxin gene evolution. The most recent cases of foodborne botulism are summarised. ..
  10. pmc Functional characterisation of germinant receptors in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium sporogenes presents novel insights into spore germination systems
    Jason Brunt
    Gut Health and Food Safety, Institute of Food Research IFR, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich, Norfolk, United Kingdom
    PLoS Pathog 10:e1004382. 2014
    ..The suitability of using C. sporogenes as a substitute for C. botulinum in germination studies and food challenge tests is discussed. ..