Elizabeth W Dunn

Summary

Affiliation: University of British Columbia
Country: Canada

Publications

  1. ncbi request reprint On emotionally intelligent time travel: individual differences in affective forecasting ability
    Elizabeth W Dunn
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 33:85-93. 2007
  2. doi request reprint Spending money on others promotes happiness
    Elizabeth W Dunn
    Department of Psychology, 2136 West Mall, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
    Science 319:1687-8. 2008
  3. doi request reprint On the costs of self-interested economic behavior: how does stinginess get under the skin?
    Elizabeth W Dunn
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    J Health Psychol 15:627-33. 2010
  4. ncbi request reprint Misunderstanding the affective consequences of everyday social interactions: the hidden benefits of putting one's best face forward
    Elizabeth W Dunn
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Pers Soc Psychol 92:990-1005. 2007
  5. doi request reprint Prosocial spending and well-being: cross-cultural evidence for a psychological universal
    Lara B Aknin
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    J Pers Soc Psychol 104:635-52. 2013
  6. doi request reprint The invisible benefits of exercise
    Matthew B Ruby
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall, Vancouver, BC
    Health Psychol 30:67-74. 2011
  7. pmc It's the recipient that counts: spending money on strong social ties leads to greater happiness than spending on weak social ties
    Lara B Aknin
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    PLoS ONE 6:e17018. 2011
  8. pmc Giving leads to happiness in young children
    Lara B Aknin
    Psychology Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    PLoS ONE 7:e39211. 2012
  9. ncbi request reprint Social Interactions and Well-Being: The Surprising Power of Weak Ties
    Gillian M Sandstrom
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 40:910-922. 2014
  10. doi request reprint Is spending money on others good for your heart?
    Ashley V Whillans
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia
    Health Psychol 35:574-83. 2016

Collaborators

Detail Information

Publications14

  1. ncbi request reprint On emotionally intelligent time travel: individual differences in affective forecasting ability
    Elizabeth W Dunn
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 33:85-93. 2007
    ..Emotion Management, a subcomponent of EI, emerged as the strongest predictor of forecasting ability...
  2. doi request reprint Spending money on others promotes happiness
    Elizabeth W Dunn
    Department of Psychology, 2136 West Mall, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
    Science 319:1687-8. 2008
    ..Finally, participants who were randomly assigned to spend money on others experienced greater happiness than those assigned to spend money on themselves...
  3. doi request reprint On the costs of self-interested economic behavior: how does stinginess get under the skin?
    Elizabeth W Dunn
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    J Health Psychol 15:627-33. 2010
    ..Thus, shame and cortisol represent plausible emotional and biological pathways linking everyday decisions with downstream consequences for health...
  4. ncbi request reprint Misunderstanding the affective consequences of everyday social interactions: the hidden benefits of putting one's best face forward
    Elizabeth W Dunn
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    J Pers Soc Psychol 92:990-1005. 2007
    ..This failure to recognize the affective benefits of putting one's best face forward may underlie forecasting errors regarding the emotional consequences of the most common forms of social interactions...
  5. doi request reprint Prosocial spending and well-being: cross-cultural evidence for a psychological universal
    Lara B Aknin
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    J Pers Soc Psychol 104:635-52. 2013
    ..Our findings suggest that the reward experienced from helping others may be deeply ingrained in human nature, emerging in diverse cultural and economic contexts...
  6. doi request reprint The invisible benefits of exercise
    Matthew B Ruby
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall, Vancouver, BC
    Health Psychol 30:67-74. 2011
    ..To examine whether--and why--people underestimate how much they enjoy exercise...
  7. pmc It's the recipient that counts: spending money on strong social ties leads to greater happiness than spending on weak social ties
    Lara B Aknin
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    PLoS ONE 6:e17018. 2011
    ..These results add to the growing literature examining the factors that moderate the link between prosocial behaviour and happiness...
  8. pmc Giving leads to happiness in young children
    Lara B Aknin
    Psychology Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    PLoS ONE 7:e39211. 2012
    ....
  9. ncbi request reprint Social Interactions and Well-Being: The Surprising Power of Weak Ties
    Gillian M Sandstrom
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 40:910-922. 2014
    ..The current results highlight the power of weak ties, suggesting that even social interactions with the more peripheral members of our social networks contribute to our well-being...
  10. doi request reprint Is spending money on others good for your heart?
    Ashley V Whillans
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia
    Health Psychol 35:574-83. 2016
    ..Does spending money on others (prosocial spending) improve the cardiovascular health of community-dwelling older adults diagnosed with high blood pressure?..
  11. pmc Talking Less during Social Interactions Predicts Enjoyment: A Mobile Sensing Pilot Study
    Gillian M Sandstrom
    Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B C, Canada
    PLoS ONE 11:e0158834. 2016
    ..It also illustrates how mobile phones can provide a window into everyday social experiences and well-being. ..
  12. ncbi request reprint When to fire: anticipatory versus postevent reconstrual of uncontrollable events
    Timothy D Wilson
    Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 30:340-51. 2004
    ..Forecasters predicted that loosing would make them feel worse than it did and selected a higher dose of a drug to cope with an anticipated loss than did people who actually lost...
  13. ncbi request reprint Location, location, location: the misprediction of satisfaction in housing lotteries
    Elizabeth W Dunn
    Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, 102 Gilmer Hall, PO Box 400400, Charlottesville, VA 22904 4400, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 29:1421-32. 2003
    ....
  14. ncbi request reprint Self-knowledge: its limits, value, and potential for improvement
    Timothy D Wilson
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 4400, USA
    Annu Rev Psychol 55:493-518. 2004
    ..It is not always advantageous to hold self-perceptions that correspond perfectly with reality, but increasing awareness of nonconscious motives and personality is generally beneficial...