germ free life

Summary

Summary: Animals not contaminated by or associated with any foreign organisms.

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Deoxycholic acid formation in gnotobiotic mice associated with human intestinal bacteria
    Seiko Narushima
    Laboratory of Veterinary Public Health, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113 8657, Japan
    Lipids 41:835-43. 2006
  2. ncbi Impact of commensal microbiota on murine gastrointestinal tract gene ontologies
    David M Mutch
    Nestle Research Center, Vers chez les Blanc, CH 1000 Lausanne 26, Switzerland
    Physiol Genomics 19:22-31. 2004
  3. pmc Symbiotic bacteria direct expression of an intestinal bactericidal lectin
    Heather L Cash
    Center for Immunology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
    Science 313:1126-30. 2006
  4. doi Innate immune homeostasis by the homeobox gene caudal and commensal-gut mutualism in Drosophila
    Ji Hwan Ryu
    Division of Molecular Life Science, Ewha Woman s University and National Creative Research Initiative Center for Symbiosystem, Seoul 120 750, South Korea
    Science 319:777-82. 2008
  5. ncbi Antibody repertoire development in fetal and neonatal piglets. IV. Switch recombination, primarily in fetal thymus, occurs independent of environmental antigen and is only weakly associated with repertoire diversification
    J E Butler
    Department of Microbiology and Interdisciplinary Immunology Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
    J Immunol 167:3239-49. 2001
  6. pmc Identifying genetic determinants needed to establish a human gut symbiont in its habitat
    Andrew L Goodman
    Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Cell Host Microbe 6:279-89. 2009
  7. ncbi Glycan foraging in vivo by an intestine-adapted bacterial symbiont
    Justin L Sonnenburg
    Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Science 307:1955-9. 2005
  8. pmc In vivo imaging and genetic analysis link bacterial motility and symbiosis in the zebrafish gut
    John F Rawls
    Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:7622-7. 2007
  9. ncbi Reciprocal gut microbiota transplants from zebrafish and mice to germ-free recipients reveal host habitat selection
    John F Rawls
    Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Cell 127:423-33. 2006
  10. ncbi Costs and benefits of high mutation rates: adaptive evolution of bacteria in the mouse gut
    A Giraud
    E9916, , , , 156 rue de Vaugirard, 75015 Paris, France
    Science 291:2606-8. 2001

Research Grants

Detail Information

Publications152 found, 100 shown here

  1. ncbi Deoxycholic acid formation in gnotobiotic mice associated with human intestinal bacteria
    Seiko Narushima
    Laboratory of Veterinary Public Health, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113 8657, Japan
    Lipids 41:835-43. 2006
    ..The gnotobiotic mouse with bacteria of human origin could be a useful model in studies of bile acid metabolism by human intestinal bacteria in vivo...
  2. ncbi Impact of commensal microbiota on murine gastrointestinal tract gene ontologies
    David M Mutch
    Nestle Research Center, Vers chez les Blanc, CH 1000 Lausanne 26, Switzerland
    Physiol Genomics 19:22-31. 2004
    ....
  3. pmc Symbiotic bacteria direct expression of an intestinal bactericidal lectin
    Heather L Cash
    Center for Immunology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
    Science 313:1126-30. 2006
    ..We propose that these proteins represent an evolutionarily primitive form of lectin-mediated innate immunity, and that they reveal intestinal strategies for maintaining symbiotic host-microbial relationships...
  4. doi Innate immune homeostasis by the homeobox gene caudal and commensal-gut mutualism in Drosophila
    Ji Hwan Ryu
    Division of Molecular Life Science, Ewha Woman s University and National Creative Research Initiative Center for Symbiosystem, Seoul 120 750, South Korea
    Science 319:777-82. 2008
    ..These results reveal that a specific genetic deficiency within a host can profoundly influence the gut commensal microbial community and host physiology...
  5. ncbi Antibody repertoire development in fetal and neonatal piglets. IV. Switch recombination, primarily in fetal thymus, occurs independent of environmental antigen and is only weakly associated with repertoire diversification
    J E Butler
    Department of Microbiology and Interdisciplinary Immunology Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
    J Immunol 167:3239-49. 2001
    ....
  6. pmc Identifying genetic determinants needed to establish a human gut symbiont in its habitat
    Andrew L Goodman
    Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Cell Host Microbe 6:279-89. 2009
    ..INSeq provides a broadly applicable platform to explore microbial adaptation to the gut and other ecosystems...
  7. ncbi Glycan foraging in vivo by an intestine-adapted bacterial symbiont
    Justin L Sonnenburg
    Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Science 307:1955-9. 2005
    ..This flexible foraging behavior should contribute to ecosystem stability and functional diversity...
  8. pmc In vivo imaging and genetic analysis link bacterial motility and symbiosis in the zebrafish gut
    John F Rawls
    Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:7622-7. 2007
    ....
  9. ncbi Reciprocal gut microbiota transplants from zebrafish and mice to germ-free recipients reveal host habitat selection
    John F Rawls
    Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Cell 127:423-33. 2006
    ....
  10. ncbi Costs and benefits of high mutation rates: adaptive evolution of bacteria in the mouse gut
    A Giraud
    E9916, , , , 156 rue de Vaugirard, 75015 Paris, France
    Science 291:2606-8. 2001
    ..The short-term advantages and long-term disadvantages of mutator bacteria could account for their frequency in nature...
  11. ncbi Role of intestinal bacterial flora in oral tolerance induction
    K Tanaka
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa, Japan
    Histol Histopathol 19:907-14. 2004
    ..Thus, these bacterias seemed to be important in oral tolerance induction. In addition, the probiotics using these bacteria may be a useful material for the treatment of allergic disorders...
  12. ncbi Non-pathogenic bacteria modulate colonic epithelial gene expression in germ-free mice
    K Fukushima
    Dept of Surgery, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 1 1 Seiryomaci, Aoba ku, Sendai, Japan
    Scand J Gastroenterol 38:626-34. 2003
    ..The aim of the study was to identify the known genes directly or indirectly modulated by non-pathologic bacterial flora in the colonic epithelia of germ-free mice...
  13. ncbi Gnotobiotic IL-10-/-;NF-kappa B(EGFP) mice reveal the critical role of TLR/NF-kappa B signaling in commensal bacteria-induced colitis
    Thomas Karrasch
    Department of Medicine and Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27510, USA
    J Immunol 178:6522-32. 2007
    ..Blocking TLR-induced NF-kappaB activity may represent an attractive strategy to treat immune-mediated intestinal inflammation...
  14. pmc Honor thy symbionts
    Jian Xu
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:10452-9. 2003
    ....
  15. ncbi A gnotobiotic transgenic mouse model for studying interactions between small intestinal enterocytes and intraepithelial lymphocytes
    Indira U Mysorekar
    Department of Molecular Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    J Biol Chem 277:37811-9. 2002
    ..Together, these findings demonstrate that changes in the proliferative status of the intestinal epithelium affects maturation of gammadelta TCR(+) IELs and produces an influx of alphabeta TCR(+) IELs even in the absence of a microflora...
  16. ncbi Bacterial colonization leads to the colonic secretion of RELMbeta/FIZZ2, a novel goblet cell-specific protein
    Weimian He
    Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, 415 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA, USA
    Gastroenterology 125:1388-97. 2003
    ..A limited number of intestinal goblet cell-specific proteins have been identified. In this study, we investigate the expression and regulation of RELMbeta, a novel colon-specific gene...
  17. ncbi Developmentally regulated intestinal expression of IFN-gamma and its target genes and the age-specific response to enteric Salmonella infection
    Sue J Rhee
    Mucosal Immunology Laboratory, Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA
    J Immunol 175:1127-36. 2005
    ..typhimurium infection resembled that of the wild-type pups. Our findings thus reveal a novel role for IFN-gamma in the developmental regulation of antimicrobial responses in the intestine...
  18. pmc Establishment and development of ruminal hydrogenotrophs in methanogen-free lambs
    Gerard Fonty
    Laboratoire de Biologie des Protistes, UMR CNRS 6023, Universite Blaise Pascal, 63177 Aubiere Cedex, France
    Appl Environ Microbiol 73:6391-403. 2007
    ..These findings provide the first evidence from animal studies that reductive acetogens can sustain a functional rumen and replace methanogens as a sink for H(2) in the rumen...
  19. pmc Transcriptome profiling of the small intestinal epithelium in germfree versus conventional piglets
    Shankar R Chowdhury
    Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA
    BMC Genomics 8:215. 2007
    ....
  20. pmc Effect of probiotic bacteria on induction and maintenance of oral tolerance to beta-lactoglobulin in gnotobiotic mice
    Guenolee Prioult
    Dairy Research Centre STELA, Département des sciences des aliments et de nutrition, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4, Canada
    Clin Diagn Lab Immunol 10:787-92. 2003
    ..This study provides evidence that probiotics modulate the oral tolerance response to BLG in mice. The mono-colonization effect is strain-dependant, the best result having been obtained with L. paracasei...
  21. ncbi Induction of protective IgA by intestinal dendritic cells carrying commensal bacteria
    Andrew J Macpherson
    Institute of Experimental Immunology, Universitatsspital, CH8091 Zurich, Switzerland
    Science 303:1662-5. 2004
    ....
  22. pmc Spatial distribution and stability of the eight microbial species of the altered schaedler flora in the mouse gastrointestinal tract
    Ramahi B Sarma-Rupavtarm
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    Appl Environ Microbiol 70:2791-800. 2004
    ....
  23. pmc Activation of RegIIIbeta/gamma and interferon gamma expression in the intestinal tract of SCID mice: an innate response to bacterial colonisation of the gut
    S A Keilbaugh
    Division of Gastroenterology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA
    Gut 54:623-9. 2005
    ....
  24. ncbi Correlation between type of adaptive immune response against porcine circovirus type 2 and level of virus replication
    P Meerts
    Laboratory of Virology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Belgium
    Viral Immunol 18:333-41. 2005
    ..Absence of PCV2-neutralizing antibodies may be an important factor in the development of an increased virus replication...
  25. pmc Development and testing of improved suicide functions for biological containment of bacteria
    S Knudsen
    Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation, University of West Florida 32561
    Appl Environ Microbiol 61:985-91. 1995
    ..We show that unprecedented suicide efficiency can be achieved in soil and seawater after suicide induction by IPTG (isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside). More than 7 orders of magnitude reduction in suicide bacteria was achieved...
  26. ncbi Effects of commensal bacteria on intestinal morphology and expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the gnotobiotic pig
    T W Shirkey
    Department of Animal and Poultry Science, 51 Campus Drive, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5A8
    Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 231:1333-45. 2006
    ....
  27. ncbi Regulatory CD4 T cells control the size of the peripheral activated/memory CD4 T cell compartment
    O Annacker
    Unité du Développement des Lymphocytes, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Unité de Recherche Associée 1961, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France
    J Immunol 164:3573-80. 2000
    ....
  28. ncbi Dendritic cells in germ-free and specific pathogen-free mice have similar phenotypes and in vitro antigen presenting function
    Kristen L W Walton
    Department of Medicine, CB 7032, 7317 MBRB, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 7032, USA
    Immunol Lett 102:16-24. 2006
    ..In addition, splenic APC from GF mice are fully competent to stimulate naïve T-cell proliferation in vitro...
  29. pmc Helicobacter hepaticus does not induce or potentiate colitis in interleukin-10-deficient mice
    L A Dieleman
    Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 7080, USA
    Infect Immun 68:5107-13. 2000
    ..hepaticus. We conclude that H. hepaticus does not induce or potentiate disease in our IL-10(-/-) mice and therefore is not required to induce colitis in genetically susceptible hosts...
  30. ncbi The effect of weaning on the clonality of alpha beta T-cell receptor T cells in the intestine of GF and SPF mice
    Christopher S J Probert
    Department of Clinical Science at South Bristol, Bristol Royal Infirmary, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS2 8HW, UK
    Dev Comp Immunol 31:606-17. 2007
    ..These data show: firstly, that under SPF conditions, the intestine is seeded with a diverse T-cell population that becomes oligoclonal around the time of weaning; secondly, that GF mice were oligoclonal at each time point...
  31. ncbi Gnotobiotic piglets as an animal model for oral infection with O157 and non-O157 serotypes of STEC
    Florian Gunzer
    Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie und Krankenhaushygiene, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany
    Methods Mol Med 73:307-27. 2003
  32. pmc Parasexual genetics of Dictyostelium gene disruptions: identification of a ras pathway using diploids
    Jason King
    School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
    BMC Genet 4:12. 2003
    ..However, the field has been hamstrung by the lack of techniques to recombine disrupted genes...
  33. pmc Influence of intestinal bacteria on induction of regulatory T cells: lessons from a transfer model of colitis
    U G Strauch
    Department of Internal Medicine I, University of Regensburg, D 93053 Regensburg, Germany
    Gut 54:1546-52. 2005
    ..Our aim was to investigate the influence of previous exposure of donor animals to bacterial antigens on colitis development using a transfer model...
  34. pmc Effects of microflora on the neonatal development of gut mucosal T cells and myeloid cells in the mouse
    Amanda M Williams
    Department of Clinical Science at South Bristol, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
    Immunology 119:470-8. 2006
    ..Their activation status depends on the microbiological status of the dam, and without a commensal flora they remain naive. We propose that these cells regulate antigen responsiveness of the developing mucosal T cell pool...
  35. ncbi The essential role of the intestinal microbiota in facilitating acute inflammatory responses
    Danielle G Souza
    Departament of Bioquímica e Imunologia e, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais UFMG, Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Brazil
    J Immunol 173:4137-46. 2004
    ..Thus, the lack of intestinal microbiota is accompanied by a state of active IL-10-mediated inflammatory hyporesponsiveness...
  36. ncbi Comparison of the immune response to Ars-BGG in germfree or conventional piglets
    K Mehrazar
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Health Sciences, Chicago Medical School, Illinois 60064
    Dev Comp Immunol 17:459-64. 1993
    ....
  37. ncbi Impaired regulatory T cell function in germ-free mice
    Sofia Ostman
    Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, Goteborg University, Goteborg, Sweden
    Eur J Immunol 36:2336-46. 2006
    ..We propose that the presence of a microbial flora favors the development of a fully functional Treg population...
  38. ncbi Trypanosoma cruzi: influence of predominant bacteria from indigenous digestive microbiota on experimental infection in mice
    R Duarte
    Departamento de Microbiologia, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
    Exp Parasitol 111:87-96. 2005
    ..cruzi in gnotobiotic mice. However, the degree of increase in production of cytokines depends on each bacterial component...
  39. ncbi Mucosal and systemic antibody responses and protection induced by a prime/boost rotavirus-DNA vaccine in a gnotobiotic pig model
    Lijuan Yuan
    Food Animal Health Research Program, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University, 1680 Madison Avenue, Wooster OH 44691, USA
    Vaccine 23:3925-36. 2005
    ..Interestingly, the VP6 DNA vaccine, although not effective when administered alone, boosted neutralizing and VP4 antibody titers in pigs previously primed with AttHRV, possibly mediated by cross-reactive T helper cells...
  40. pmc Transfer of vancomycin resistance transposon Tn1549 from Clostridium symbiosum to Enterococcus spp. in the gut of gnotobiotic mice
    Aline Launay
    Centre d Etudes Pharmaceutiques, Chatenay Malabry, France
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 50:1054-62. 2006
    ..These data demonstrate functionality of the Tn1549-like element and attest that the transfer of the vanB operon between enterococci and human commensal anaerobes occurs in the intestinal environment...
  41. pmc A hybrid two-component system protein of a prominent human gut symbiont couples glycan sensing in vivo to carbohydrate metabolism
    Erica D Sonnenburg
    Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:8834-9. 2006
    ..An expanded repertoire of HTCS proteins with diversified sensor domains may be one reason for B. thetaiotaomicron's success in our intestinal ecosystem...
  42. ncbi A genomic view of our symbiosis with members of the gut microbiota
    Jeffrey I Gordon
    Center for Genome Sciences and Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri, USA
    J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 40:S28. 2005
  43. pmc Movement and fixation of intestinal microbiota after administration of human feces to germfree mice
    Ryoko Kibe
    Department of Veterinary Biochemistry, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan
    Appl Environ Microbiol 71:3171-8. 2005
    ..Our results indicate that the intestinal microbiota of HFA mice represents a limited sample of bacteria from the human source and are selected by unknown interactions between the host and bacteria...
  44. ncbi Indigenous microbes and their soluble factors differentially modulate intestinal glycosylation steps in vivo. Use of a "lectin assay" to survey in vivo glycosylation changes
    Miguel Freitas
    Pierre et Marie Curie UMR538, MF, GT, INSERM University, CHU St Antoine, 27 rue de Chaligny, 75012, Paris, France
    Histochem Cell Biol 124:423-33. 2005
    ....
  45. pmc Gnotobiotic zebrafish reveal evolutionarily conserved responses to the gut microbiota
    John F Rawls
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:4596-601. 2004
    ..Together, these studies establish gnotobiotic zebrafish as a useful model for dissecting the molecular foundations of host-microbial interactions in the vertebrate digestive tract...
  46. ncbi Screening of yeasts as probiotic based on capacities to colonize the gastrointestinal tract and to protect against enteropathogen challenge in mice
    Flariano S Martins
    Departamento de Microbiologia, ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
    J Gen Appl Microbiol 51:83-92. 2005
    ..cerevisiae tested, strain 905 showed the best characteristics to be used as a probiotic as demonstrated by survival capacity in the gastrointestinal tract and protective effect of animals during experimental infections...
  47. ncbi Effects of probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei treatment on the host gut tissue metabolic profiles probed via magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy
    Francois Pierre J Martin
    Department of Biomolecular Medicine, Division of Surgery, Oncology, Reproductive Biology and Anaesthetics, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK
    J Proteome Res 6:1471-81. 2007
    ..These signals acted as reference profiles with which to compare changes in response to gut microbiota manipulation at the tissue level as demonstrated by ingestion of a bacterial probiotic...
  48. ncbi [Early bacterial colonisation of the intestine: why it matters?]
    J P Langhendries
    Centre Hospitalier Chrétien CHC, NICU, rue François Lefèbvre, 207, 4000 Liège Rocourt, Belgique
    Arch Pediatr 13:1526-34. 2006
    ..It is of great concern to decrease these possible negative influences and to discover in the near future the possible means of helping to manipulate positively the gut microbiotia of infants...
  49. ncbi Use of axenic animals in studying the adaptation of mammals to their commensal intestinal microbiota
    Karen Smith
    Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    Semin Immunol 19:59-69. 2007
    ....
  50. pmc The gut flora as a forgotten organ
    Ann M O'Hara
    Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, National University of Ireland, Cork, Ireland
    EMBO Rep 7:688-93. 2006
    ..An improved understanding of this hidden organ will reveal secrets that are relevant to human health and to several infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic disease processes...
  51. ncbi Human flora-associated (HFA) animals as a model for studying the role of intestinal flora in human health and disease
    Kazuhiro Hirayama
    Laboratory of Veterinary Public Health, Department of Veterinary Medical Science, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113 8657, Japan
    Curr Issues Intest Microbiol 6:69-75. 2005
    ..HFA animals also can be used as models to investigate the interactions between the human intestinal flora, host factors, dietary manipulations, and therapeutics, such as probiotics, prebiotics, and antibiotics...
  52. pmc In vitro and in vivo bacteriolytic activities of Escherichia coli phages: implications for phage therapy
    Sandra Chibani-Chennoufi
    Nestle Research Center, Nestec Ltd, Vers chez les Blanc, CH 1000 Lausanne 26, Switzerland
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 48:2558-69. 2004
    ..coli colonies were susceptible to the given phage cocktail. Apparently, the resident E. coli gut flora is physically or physiologically protected against phage infection...
  53. pmc Microbial regulation of intestinal radiosensitivity
    Peter A Crawford
    Center for Genome Sciences and Department of Molecular Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102:13254-9. 2005
    ..Together, these findings provide insights about the cellular and molecular targets involved in microbial regulation of intestinal radiosensitivity...
  54. pmc Genomic and metabolic studies of the impact of probiotics on a model gut symbiont and host
    Justin L Sonnenburg
    Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, United States of America
    PLoS Biol 4:e413. 2006
    ....
  55. ncbi Effect of the Escherichia coli EMO strain on experimental infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in gnotobiotic mice
    J V M Lima-Filho
    Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE, Brazil
    Braz J Med Biol Res 37:1005-13. 2004
    ..This protection was not due to the reduction of the population of pathogens in the intestine but was probably related to stimulation of the immune response...
  56. ncbi Functional genomic studies of the intestinal response to a foodborne enteropathogen in a humanized gnotobiotic mouse model
    Marc Lecuit
    Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA
    J Biol Chem 282:15065-72. 2007
    ..Together, these studies establish that hly, rather than bacterial invasion of the lamina propria mediated by InlA, is a dominant determinant of the intensity of the host response to L. monocytogenes infection via the oral route...
  57. ncbi Hepatic changes in mice chronically infected with Helicobacter trogontum
    S B Moura
    Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brasilia, DF, Brasil
    Braz J Med Biol Res 36:1209-13. 2003
    ..trogontum in the latter. This result, together with the growing number of related reports in the literature, reinforces the possible role of Helicobacter infection in the pathogenesis of hepatobiliary diseases...
  58. ncbi Development and compartmentalization of the porcine TCR delta repertoire at mucosal and extraintestinal sites: the pig as a model for analyzing the effects of age and microbial factors
    Wolfgang Holtmeier
    Medizinische Klinik II, Division of Gastroenterology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitat, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
    J Immunol 169:1993-2002. 2002
    ..Furthermore, these data support the hypothesis that in each mucosal site, different Ags are responsible for selecting and maintaining the gammadelta TCR over time...
  59. ncbi Induction of mucosal immune responses and protection against enteric viruses: rotavirus infection of gnotobiotic pigs as a model
    Lijuan Yuan
    Epidemiology Section, Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    Vet Immunol Immunopathol 87:147-60. 2002
    ..n. vaccines...
  60. ncbi [Bifidobacterium adolescentis suppresses the humoral immune response to an autochthonous intestinal bacterium--experiments with gnotobiotic rats]
    L Scharek
    Institut fur Immunologie und Molekularbiologie, Fachbereich Veterinarmedizin, Freien Universitat Berlin
    Berl Munch Tierarztl Wochenschr 115:173-8. 2002
    ..thetaiotaomicron challenged the mucosal as well as the systemic immune system. Furthermore B. adolescentis obviously suppressed the systemic and mucosal immune reaction against the autochthonous B. thetaiotaomicron...
  61. ncbi How host-microbial interactions shape the nutrient environment of the mammalian intestine
    Lora V Hooper
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA
    Annu Rev Nutr 22:283-307. 2002
    ..These and other studies underscore the importance of understanding precisely how nutrient metabolism serves to establish and sustain symbiotic relationships between mammals and their bacterial partners...
  62. pmc Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 inhibits leaky gut by enhancing mucosal integrity
    Sya N Ukena
    Department of Mucosal Immunity, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany
    PLoS ONE 2:e1308. 2007
    ..Disruption of this border alters paracellular permeability and is a key mechanism for the development of enteric infections and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs)...
  63. ncbi Experimental infection of germ-free mice with hyper-toxigenic enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7, strain 6
    Haruhiko Taguchi
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo, Japan
    J Med Microbiol 51:336-43. 2002
    ..These results indicate that the infection of GF mice with HT-EHEC is a useful animal model to study the pathogenicity of SLT-producing E. coliand the toxins...
  64. ncbi Interrelationships between dairy product intake, microflora metabolism, faecal properties and plasmid dissemination in gnotobiotic mice
    Sylvie Maisonneuve
    Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Centre de Recherche de Jouy en Josas, Unité d Ecologie et de Physiologie du Système Digestif, France
    Br J Nutr 87:121-9. 2002
    ..When beta-galactosidase increased and beta-glucosidase decreased (case of yoghurt, HTY and milk), plasmid transfer occurred at a lower efficiency than in the control group, resulting in lower population levels of transconjugants...
  65. pmc Rapid protection of gnotobiotic pigs against experimental salmonellosis following induction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes by avirulent Salmonella enterica
    N Foster
    Division of Environmental Microbiology, Institute for Animal Health, Compton Laboratory, Compton, Newbury, Berkshire RG20 7NN, United Kingdom
    Infect Immun 71:2182-91. 2003
    ..They also demonstrate that PMN induction is not necessarily associated with clinical symptoms and/or intestinal pathology...
  66. pmc Commensal-dependent expression of IL-25 regulates the IL-23-IL-17 axis in the intestine
    Colby Zaph
    Department of Pathobiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    J Exp Med 205:2191-8. 2008
    ..We propose that acquisition of, or alterations in, commensal bacteria influences intestinal immune homeostasis via direct regulation of the IL-25-IL-23-IL-17 axis...
  67. ncbi Molecular analysis of commensal host-microbial relationships in the intestine
    L V Hooper
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Science 291:881-4. 2001
    ..These findings provide perspectives about the essential nature of the interactions between resident microorganisms and their hosts...
  68. ncbi A primitive T cell-independent mechanism of intestinal mucosal IgA responses to commensal bacteria
    A J MacPherson
    Institute of Experimental Immunology, Universitatsspital, Schmelzbergstrasse 12, CH8091, Zurich, Switzerland
    Science 288:2222-6. 2000
    ....
  69. pmc A molecular sensor that allows a gut commensal to control its nutrient foundation in a competitive ecosystem
    L V Hooper
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96:9833-8. 1999
    ..Coordinating this commensal's immediate nutritional requirements with production of a host-derived energy source is consistent with its need to enter and persist within a competitive ecosystem...
  70. pmc Sensitivity to Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 in mice is dependent on environment and genetic background
    Andre Bleich
    Institute for Laboratory Animal Science and Central Animal Facility, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany
    Int J Exp Pathol 89:45-54. 2008
    ..This study shows that EcN is capable of displaying a virulent phenotype in GF C3H/HeJZtm mice. Whether this phenotype is linked to the bacterium's probiotic nature should be the focus of further studies...
  71. ncbi Effect of hemorrhagic shock on gut barrier function and expression of stress-related genes in normal and gnotobiotic mice
    Runkuan Yang
    Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 283:R1263-74. 2002
    ....
  72. ncbi The armed truce between the intestinal microflora and host mucosal immunity
    Andrew J Macpherson
    Semin Immunol 19:57-8. 2007
  73. ncbi Molecular interactions between bacteria, the epithelium, and the mucosal immune system in the intestinal tract: implications for chronic inflammation
    Thomas Clavel
    Experimental Nutritional Medicine, Else Kroner Fresenius Center for Nutritional Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Am Forum 5, 85350 Freising Weihenstephan, Germany
    Curr Issues Intest Microbiol 8:25-43. 2007
    ..It also seeks to give an overview of potential regulatory mechanisms involved in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, and discusses the clinical implications for inflammatory bowel diseases...
  74. ncbi Colonization of gnotobiotic mice with human gut microflora at birth protects against Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin-mediated abrogation of oral tolerance
    Valerie Gaboriau-Routhiau
    Unité d Ecologie et de Physiologie du Système Digestif, INRA, 78352 Jouy en Josas Cedex, France
    Pediatr Res 54:739-46. 2003
    ....
  75. ncbi [Intestinal microflora and cancer prevention]
    Masami Morotomi
    Yakult Central Institute for Microbiological Research, 1769 Yaho, Kunitachi, Tokyo 186 8650, Japan
    Gan To Kagaku Ryoho 30:741-7. 2003
    ..Here, data will be presented to show the relationship between intestinal microflora and colon cancers, mainly from our studies, and the mechanism involved will be further discussed...
  76. ncbi Bacteroides vulgatus protects against Escherichia coli-induced colitis in gnotobiotic interleukin-2-deficient mice
    Marc Waidmann
    Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie und Krankenhaushygiene, Eberhard Karls Universitat, Tubingen, Germany
    Gastroenterology 125:162-77. 2003
    ..Specific pathogen-free (SPF), but not germ-free, interleukin (IL)-2-deficient (IL-2-/-) mice develop colitis. The colitogenicity of commensal bacteria was determined...
  77. ncbi B1 cells contribute to serum IgM, but not to intestinal IgA, production in gnotobiotic Ig allotype chimeric mice
    M Christine Thurnheer
    Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
    J Immunol 170:4564-71. 2003
    ..However, most of the total as well as bacteria-specific intestinal IgA was produced by B2 cells. These data suggest that intestinal IgA production induced by commensal bacteria is mainly performed by B2, not B1, cells...
  78. pmc Genomic and metabolic adaptations of Methanobrevibacter smithii to the human gut
    Buck S Samuel
    Center for Genome Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:10643-8. 2007
    ..These findings provide a framework for designing strategies to change the representation and/or properties of M. smithii in the human gut microbiota...
  79. ncbi Differential effect of Bacillus firmus on immune response and enterocyte brush-border enzyme levels in BALB/c and B10.BR mice
    H Kozakova
    Department of Immunology and Gnotobiology, Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 549 22 Novy Hradek, Czechia
    Folia Microbiol (Praha) 47:759-65. 2002
    ..The stimulation of immunoglobulin production after BF treatment was accompanied by changes in the levels of enterocyte brush-border enzymes; this responsiveness to BF treatment was genetically regulated...
  80. pmc Divergent patterns of colonization and immune response elicited from two intestinal Lactobacillus strains that display similar properties in vitro
    Nabila Ibnou-Zekri
    Department of Biosciences, Nestle Research Center, Lausanne, Switzerland
    Infect Immun 71:428-36. 2003
    ..Therefore, despite similar in vitro probiotic properties, distinct Lactobacillus strains may colonize the gut differently and generate divergent immune responses...
  81. ncbi Early bacterial dependent induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in epithelial cells upon transfer of CD45RB(high) CD4(+) T cells in a model for experimental colitis
    Gerard Dijkstra
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands
    Inflamm Bowel Dis 13:1467-74. 2007
    ..Both the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) as well as the molecular details governing its mucosal induction remain unclear...
  82. pmc Developmental regulation of intestinal angiogenesis by indigenous microbes via Paneth cells
    Thaddeus S Stappenbeck
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:15451-5. 2002
    ....
  83. pmc Multiple antibiotic resistance gene transfer from animal to human enterococci in the digestive tract of gnotobiotic mice
    C Moubareck
    Laboratoire de Microbiologie, UFR de sciences pharmaceutiques et biologiques, Universite Rene Descartes, 75270 Paris Cedex 06, France
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 47:2993-6. 2003
    ..Tylosin in the drinking water favored colonization by transconjugants...
  84. pmc An imbalance in mucosal cytokine profile causes transient intestinal inflammation following an animal's first exposure to faecal bacteria and antigens
    B C Sydora
    Center of Excellence for Gastrointestinal Inflammation and Immunity Research, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Clin Exp Immunol 161:187-96. 2010
    ....
  85. ncbi Prevention of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection in gnotobiotic mice associated with Bifidobacterium strains
    Kazutoshi Yoshimura
    Laboratory of Veterinary Public Health, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113 8657, Japan
    Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 97:107-17. 2010
    ..longum subsp. longum/infantis can protect against the lethal infections of E. coli O157:H7 by preventing Shiga toxin production in the cecum and/or Shiga toxin transfer from the intestinal lumen to the bloodstream...
  86. pmc Innate and adaptive immunity cooperate flexibly to maintain host-microbiota mutualism
    Emma Slack
    Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8, Canada
    Science 325:617-20. 2009
    ..Spontaneous hyper-activation of adaptive immunity against the intestinal microbiota, secondary to innate immune deficiency, may clarify the underlying mechanisms of inflammatory diseases where immune dysfunction is implicated...
  87. pmc Impact of therapeutic treatment with beta-lactam on transfer of the bla(CTX-M-9) resistance gene from Salmonella enterica serovar Virchow to Escherichia coli in gnotobiotic rats
    Stéphanie Faure
    Laboratory for the Research and Investigation of Veterinary Drugs and Disinfectants, Pharmacokinetic Pharmacodynamic Unit, AFSSA Fougeres, BP 90203, La Haute Marche, 35133 Javene, France
    Appl Environ Microbiol 75:5523-8. 2009
    ..Thus, estimates of in vitro transfer underestimated potential transfer in the digestive tract, and therapeutic doses of cefixime did not increase the selection for transconjugants...
  88. pmc Oxidation-specific epitopes are dominant targets of innate natural antibodies in mice and humans
    Meng Yun Chou
    Department of Medicine, UCSD, La Jolla, California 92093, USA
    J Clin Invest 119:1335-49. 2009
    ..These findings provide novel insights into the functions of NAbs in mediating host homeostasis and into their roles in health and diseases, such as chronic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis...
  89. ncbi Tumor induction in germfree rats with methylazoxymethanol (MAM) and synthetic MAM acetate
    G L Laqueur
    Laboratory of Experimental Pathology National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland 20014, USA
    J Natl Cancer Inst 39:355-71. 1967
    ..Intraperitoneal administration of the synthetic aglycone acetate and the free aglycone appears to be the most effective route for tumor induction and, of these resulting tumors, the most frequent are in the intestinal tract...
  90. ncbi Eubacterium limosum activates isoxanthohumol from hops (Humulus lupulus L.) into the potent phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin in vitro and in rat intestine
    Sam Possemiers
    Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, B 9000 Gent, Belgium
    J Nutr 138:1310-6. 2008
    ..In conclusion, intestinal microbiota determined 8-PN production and exposure after IX intake. Moreover, E. limosum administration increased 8-PN production in low producers, resulting in similar 8-PN production in all rats...
  91. ncbi IgA response to symbiotic bacteria as a mediator of gut homeostasis
    Daniel A Peterson
    Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Cell Host Microbe 2:328-39. 2007
    ..Immunoselection of bacterial epitope expression may contribute to the remarkable strain-level diversity in this ecosystem...
  92. doi Gut check: testing a role for the intestinal microbiome in human obesity
    Jeffrey S Flier
    Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Sci Transl Med 1:6ps7. 2009
    ..This model should encourage investigation of the gut microbiome as a contributor to human metabolic disease and permit discovery of targets for the prevention and treatment of these disorders...
  93. ncbi Reconstitution of functional human B lymphocytes in NOD/SCID mice engrafted with ex vivo expanded CD34(+) cord blood cells
    Chenwgwen Li
    Department of Hematology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa, Japan
    Exp Hematol 30:1036-43. 2002
    ..Therefore, we investigated the antigen-specific antibody production in human B cells maturated from ex vivo expanded cord blood (CB) CD34(+) cells in NOD/Shi-scid (NOD/SCID) mice...
  94. ncbi The virulence for gnotobiotic pigs of live attenuated vaccine strains of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis
    P A Barrow
    Institute for Animal Health, Compton Laboratory, Compton, Berkshire, RG20 7NN, Newbury, UK
    Vaccine 19:3432-6. 2001
    ..Enteritidis. The parental strains were virulent, inducing severe diarrhoea, dehydration and systemic disease. The cya crp mutant was also highly virulent whereas the aroA strains were attenuated...
  95. ncbi Escherichia coli S fimbriae do not contribute to intestinal colonization or translocation in the gnotobiotic rat
    V M Herías
    Department of Clinical Immunology, Goteborg University, Goteborg, Sweden
    Microb Pathog 31:103-7. 2001
    ..The results suggest that S fimbriae, despite binding to intestinal epithelial cells and mucus, do not contribute to either colonization or translocation in the gnotobiotic rat...
  96. ncbi Pathogenicity of Actinobacillus minor, Actinobacillus indolicus and Actinobacillus porcinus strains for gnotobiotic piglets
    K Chiers
    Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Poultry Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820 Merelbeke, Belgium
    J Vet Med B Infect Dis Vet Public Health 48:127-31. 2001
    ..minor, A. indolicus and A. porcinus strains had low capacity to colonize the upper respiratory tract of gnotobiotic piglets and demonstrated low or no pathogenicity in such animals...
  97. ncbi Colonization and persistence of rough and smooth colony variants of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in the mouths of rats
    D H Fine
    Department of Oral Pathology and Biology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Dental School, Dental Research Center, 110 Bergen Street, Newark, NJ 07103, USA
    Arch Oral Biol 46:1065-78. 2001
    ..The model provides convincing evidence that, unlike laboratory variants, clinical isolates colonize, persist and integrate into an already established, albeit reduced, econiche...
  98. ncbi Gnotobiotic transgenic mice reveal that transmission of Helicobacter pylori is facilitated by loss of acid-producing parietal cells in donors and recipients
    Britta Björkholm
    Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8510, 4444 Forest Park, St Louis, MO 63108, USA
    Microbes Infect 6:213-20. 2004
    ..Our findings lead to the testable hypothesis that the relative hypochlorhydria of young children, and conditions that promote reduced acid production in infected adults (e.g. CAG), represent risk factors for spread of H. pylori...
  99. pmc Magnitude of serum and intestinal antibody responses induced by sequential replicating and nonreplicating rotavirus vaccines in gnotobiotic pigs and correlation with protection
    Marli S P Azevedo
    Food Animal Health Research Program, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University, Wooster, Ohio 44691
    Clin Diagn Lab Immunol 11:12-20. 2004
    ..89; P < 0.001) with the corresponding isotype antibody (IgA) titers in the intestines among all the vaccinated groups, indicating that the IgA antibody titer is probably the most reliable indicator of protection...
  100. ncbi The production of transgenic pigs for potential use in clinical xenotransplantation: microbiological evaluation
    Alexander Tucker
    Novartis Pharma AG, PO Box 399, Cambridge, CBYP22, UK
    Xenotransplantation 9:191-202. 2002
    ..Intensive health monitoring programs, based upon regularly updated recommendations from the microbiological research community, will enable significant reductions in the potential hazards associated with pig-to-human xenotransplantation...
  101. pmc Mutator bacteria as a risk factor in treatment of infectious diseases
    Antoine Giraud
    UEPSD FBI, Bat 440 CRJ Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, 78352 Jouy en Josas, France
    Antimicrob Agents Chemother 46:863-5. 2002
    ..Because of these mutator alleles' high mutation rates, the initial treatment failure increases the probability of failures in subsequent treatments with other drugs...

Research Grants94

  1. Different bacterial species selectively induce TH1 cells
    Sandra Kim; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..c. Determining if recombinant nonpathogenic bacteria engineered to expressing the dominant E.faecalis epitope can induce T cell - mediated colitis and duodenitis. ..
  2. Molecular Determinants of Virulence Porcine Circovirus 2
    Steven Krakowka; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Collectively, these data will provide critical insight into pathogenic mechanisms of disease mediated by mammalian circoviruses and will provide key guidance for the future study of human circovirus pathogens. ..
  3. Molecular Determinants of Virulence Porcine Circovirus 2
    Steven Krakowka; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Collectively, these data will provide critical insight into pathogenic mechanisms of disease mediated by mammalian circoviruses and will provide key guidance for the future study of human circovirus pathogens. ..
  4. LETHAL OROESOPHAGEAL CANDIDIASIS: IMMUNOTHERAPY
    Edward Balish; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..Restoration and enhancement of immune function may be critical for the effectiveness of anti-Candida vaccines that are now under development. ..
  5. LETHAL OROESOPHAGEAL CANDIDIASIS: IMMUNOTHERAPY
    Edward Balish; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ..Restoration and enhancement of immune function may be critical for the effectiveness of anti-Candida vaccines that are now under development. ..
  6. LETHAL OROESOPHAGEAL CANDIDIASIS: IMMUNOTHERAPY
    Edward Balish; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..Restoration and enhancement of immune function may be critical for the effectiveness of anti-Candida vaccines that are now under development. ..
  7. LETHAL OROESOPHAGEAL CANDIDIASIS: IMMUNOTHERAPY
    Edward Balish; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Restoration and enhancement of immune function may be critical for the effectiveness of anti-Candida vaccines that are now under development. ..
  8. LETHAL OROESOPHAGEAL CANDIDIASIS: IMMUNOTHERAPY
    Edward Balish; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..Restoration and enhancement of immune function may be critical for the effectiveness of anti-Candida vaccines that are now under development. ..
  9. Enteric flora modulates the development of colitis
    Albert Jergens; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..g., graduate students and postdoctoral fellow). There are ample opportunities to attend seminars, journal clubs and work-in-progress research meetings during which the applicant can become engaged in scientific discussions. ..
  10. Enteric flora modulates the development of colitis
    Albert Jergens; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..g., graduate students and postdoctoral fellow). There are ample opportunities to attend seminars, journal clubs and work-in-progress research meetings during which the applicant can become engaged in scientific discussions. ..
  11. Enteric flora modulates the development of colitis
    Albert Jergens; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..g., graduate students and postdoctoral fellow). There are ample opportunities to attend seminars, journal clubs and work-in-progress research meetings during which the applicant can become engaged in scientific discussions. ..
  12. Enteric flora modulates the development of colitis
    Albert Jergens; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..g., graduate students and postdoctoral fellow). There are ample opportunities to attend seminars, journal clubs and work-in-progress research meetings during which the applicant can become engaged in scientific discussions. ..
  13. Helicobacter induced hepatitis and tumorigenesis
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..A more complete understanding of the etiopathogenesis of hepatobiliary disease and hepatocellular carcinoma is likely to result in new strategies for treatment and prevention of these important human diseases. ..
  14. Localized Aggressive Periodontitis: Microbial & Host Markers for Susceptibility
    Daniel Fine; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ....
  15. Vibrio fischeri as a model of bacterial colonization
    MARGARET MC FALL NGAI; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..abstract_text> ..
  16. INFECTIOUS DISEASE AND BASIC MICROBIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS
    Dennis Kasper; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Although only eight positions per year are supported by this grant, 175 postdoctoral trainees are currently being funded by our training program in the laboratories of the 39 participating research mentors. ..
  17. Development of an additive model to study the significance of heat-labile and hea
    Weiping Zhang; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  18. IN VIVO PATHOGENESIS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..pylori pathogenesis and specifically evaluate the role of regulatory T cells in limiting H. pylori-induced gastric pathology. ..
  19. PATHOGENIC MECHANISMS OF ANAEROBES IN SEPSIS
    Dennis Kasper; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  20. Host and Bacterial Factors in Disease due to H. pylori
    KATHRYN EATON; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Successful completion of these aims will lead to improved understanding of the pathogenesis of H. pylori associated disease and provide a foundation for development of novel therapies. ..
  21. Analyses of Progression to Colon Cancer in a Spectrum of Pathways
    WILLIAM FRANKLIN DOVE; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Signatures that can discriminate between tumors that vary in neoplastic potential are particularly important to discern. ..
  22. Host and Bacterial Factors in Disease due to H. pylori
    KATHRYN EATON; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..This will allow us to hire additional staff to ensure rapid completion of the remaining experiments. With these changes we fully expect to complete these experiments in 2 years. ..
  23. IN VIVO PATHOGENESIS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2000
    ....
  24. IN VIVO PATHOGENESIS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ....
  25. HELIOBACTER INDUCED HEPATITIS AND TUMORIGENESIS
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..hepaticus at different stages of infection. ..
  26. Bacterial regulation of intestinal antimicrobial defense
    LORA HOOPER; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..Furthermore, this work will aid in designing novel strategies for strengthening the role of the microflora in enhancing the mucosal barrier. ..
  27. Attachment of Oral Actinobacillus to Epithelium
    Daniel Fine; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..The longterm goal of this application is to use this information to identify targets for therapeutic agents that can interfere with attachment of Aa to oral tissues and thus prevent colonization leading to LAP. [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  28. Preterm birth, lung innate immunity, and RSV
    Mark Ackermann; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..The work is significant because it discovers the underlying basis for RSV susceptibility preterm and mechanistic approaches to enhance innate immunity. ..
  29. Host and Bacterial Factors in Disease due to H. pylori
    Kathryn A Eaton; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..This will allow us to hire additional staff to ensure rapid completion of the remaining experiments. With these changes we fully expect to complete these experiments in 2 years. ..
  30. IN VIVO PATHOGENESIS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..pylori pathogenesis and specifically evaluate the role of regulatory T cells in limiting H. pylori-induced gastric pathology. ..
  31. Activation of Insect Immunity by Gram-negative Bactria
    Neal Silverman; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Such an understanding is critical to our ability to devise more effective therapies against inflammatory disease. ..
  32. A Genome Sequence Survey of Enterocytozoon bieneusi
    Donna Akiyoshi; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..c. Establishment of a website to provide access to the sequence data and clones by the scientific community. ..
  33. Helicobacter induced hepatitis and tumorigenesis
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..A more complete understanding of the etiopathogenesis of hepatobiliary disease and hepatocellular carcinoma is likely to result in new strategies for treatment and prevention of these important human diseases. ..
  34. Activation of Insect Immunity by Gram-negative Bactria
    Neal Silverman; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Such an understanding is critical to our ability to devise more effective therapies against inflammatory disease. ..
  35. Intracellular Bacterial Recognition in the Drosophila Innate Immune Response
    Neal Silverman; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ....
  36. Bacterial regulation of intestinal antimicrobial defense
    LORA HOOPER; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..Furthermore, this work will aid in designing novel strategies for strengthening the role of the microflora in enhancing the mucosal barrier. ..
  37. The Pirc Rat, a Newly Generated Model for Familial Human Colon Cancer
    William Dove; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..Pirc rats To develop imaging of the Pirc rat in vivo by microCT, microPET and endoscopy, establishing the potential to perform longitudinal studies of chemopreventive and therapeutic treatment, using celecoxib and 5-FU as test cases ..
  38. Preterm birth, lung innate immunity, and RSV
    Mark Ackermann; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..The work is significant because it discovers the underlying basis for RSV susceptibility preterm and mechanistic approaches to enhance innate immunity. ..
  39. Tannerella forsythia intercations with host cells and other bacteria
    Ashu Sharma; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..The studies proposed in this application are aimed at understanding the mechanisms of BspA-induced pathogenesis in periodontal disease and will be vital in developing therapeutic strategies against periodontal diseases in future. ..
  40. Localized Aggressive Periodontitis: Microbial & Host Markers for Susceptibility
    Daniel Fine; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  41. Analyses of Progression to Colon Cancer in a Spectrum of Pathways
    William Dove; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  42. Bacterial regulation of intestinal antimicrobial defense
    LORA HOOPER; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Furthermore, this work will aid in designing novel strategies for strengthening the role of the microflora in enhancing the mucosal barrier. ..
  43. Different bacterial species selectively induce TH1 cells
    Sandra Kim; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..c. Determining if recombinant nonpathogenic bacteria engineered to expressing the dominant E.faecalis epitope can induce T cell - mediated colitis and duodenitis. ..
  44. Preterm birth, lung innate immunity, and RSV
    Mark Ackermann; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..The work is significant because it discovers the underlying basis for RSV susceptibility preterm and mechanistic approaches to enhance innate immunity. ..
  45. New England Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense
    Dennis Kasper; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Thus, the NERCE will greatly improve the preparedness of the United States to resist and respond to attacks by infectious agents, whether their source is bioterrorism or nature. [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  46. HOST FACTORS MEDIATE INVASION BY CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI
    LINDA MANSFIELD; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..jejuni invasion is facilitated due to a direct effect of some secreted/excreted product of the worms, and 4) Determine what host cell genes are differentially expressed during C. jejuni invasion. ..
  47. Helicobacter induced hepatitis and tumorigenesis
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..A more complete understanding of the etiopathogenesis of hepatobiliary disease and hepatocellular carcinoma is likely to result in new strategies for treatment and prevention of these important human diseases. ..
  48. Genetic and molecular analysis of Yersinia YopJ
    Neal Silverman; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..By identifying the true targets of YopJ, new therapeutic means to treat the plague can be devised, thus reducing the potential impact of a bioterrorist attack. ..
  49. IN VIVO PATHOGENESIS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ....
  50. Oral Immunology/Microbiology Annual Meeting
    Daniel Fine; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..Perpetuation of the OIMRG and its annual meetings greatly enhances the spirit of collegial interaction/collaboration among investigators with expertise in immunology and microbial pathogenesis as related to oral health and disease. ..
  51. Vibrio fischeri as a model of bacterial colonization
    MARGARET MC FALL NGAI; Fiscal Year: 2002
    ..abstract_text> ..
  52. Activation of Insect Immunity by Gram-negative Bactria
    Neal Silverman; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Such an understanding is critical to our ability to devise more effective therapies against inflammatory disease. ..
  53. Host and Bacterial Factors in Disease due to H. pylori
    KATHRYN EATON; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..Successful completion of these aims will lead to improved understanding of the pathogenesis of H. pylori associated disease and provide a foundation for development of novel therapies. ..
  54. Vibrio fischeri as a model of bacterial colonization
    MARGARET MC FALL NGAI; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..abstract_text> ..
  55. Microbial Markers for Periodontal Disease in Children
    Daniel Fine; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ....
  56. Attachment of Oral Actinobacillus to Epithelium
    Daniel Fine; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..The longterm goal of this application is to use this information to identify targets for therapeutic agents that can interfere with attachment of Aa to oral tissues and thus prevent colonization leading to LAP. ..
  57. B.forsythus BsPA protein: role in virulence
    Ashu Sharma; Fiscal Year: 2003
    ..In the long term, understanding the basic mechanisms of the BspA-mediated pathogenesis of B. forsythus will be vital in developing intervention strategies against periodontal disease. ..
  58. Intracellular Bacterial Recognition in the Drosophila Innate Immune Response
    Neal Silverman; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  59. Bacterial regulation of intestinal antimicrobial defense
    LORA HOOPER; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..Furthermore, this work will aid in designing novel strategies for strengthening the role of the microflora in enhancing the mucosal barrier. ..
  60. PATHOGENIC MECHANISMS OF ANAEROBES IN SEPSIS
    Dennis Kasper; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..One of the ultimate goals of this investigation is to understand how polysaccharides activate T cells, which might in turn lead to the design of the interventional strategies for potential new vaccines. ..
  61. HUS Pathogenesis & clinical Outcome in an in vivo model
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..We will use this model to study the pathogenesis of HUS and importantly to develop therapeutic regimens to prevent and treat EHEC disease. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  62. IN VIVO PATHOGENESIS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..pylori pathogenesis and specifically evaluate the role of regulatory T cells in limiting H. pylori-induced gastric pathology. ..
  63. IN VIVO PATHOGENESIS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..Thirdly, the choice of virulence factors ot be tested in vivo will in part be determined by in vitro assays as well as screening H. pylori isogenic mutants in a mouse model, recently developed in our laboratory. ..
  64. Vibrio fischeri as a model of bacterial colonization
    MARGARET MC FALL NGAI; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ..It provides a powerful complement to the similar, yet more complex, germ-free vertebrate models of beneficial associations. ..
  65. Mechanisms of Immune Modulation by Probiotics
    Lijuan Yuan; Fiscal Year: 2009
    ....
  66. HELIOBACTER INDUCED HEPATITIS AND TUMORIGENESIS
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 1999
    ..hepaticus at different stages of infection. ..
  67. Protection from Mucosal Pathology by Gut Microflora during Experimental Colitis
    SARKIS KRIKOR MAZMANIAN; Fiscal Year: 2010
    ..Most importantly, this information may potentially provide the basis for development of novel therapeutic treatments for IBD in humans. ..
  68. Intracellular Bacterial Recognition in the Drosophila Innate Immune Response
    Neal Silverman; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ....
  69. Helicobacter induced hepatitis and tumorigenesis
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..A more complete understanding of the etiopathogenesis of hepatobiliary disease and hepatocellular carcinoma is likely to result in new strategies for treatment and prevention of these important human diseases. ..
  70. Helicobacter induced hepatitis and tumorigenesis
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..A more complete understanding of the etiopathogenesis of hepatobiliary disease and hepatocellular carcinoma is likely to result in new strategies for treatment and prevention of these important human diseases. ..
  71. Microecology-murine gut-initiation & progression of IBD
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..prior and subsequent to oral vaccination with Helicobacter spp. antigens and mucosal adjuvants, elucidate how these vaccine strategies influence microflora dynamics and impact gut cytokine responses. ..
  72. DEVELOPING AND IMPROVING INSTITUTIONAL ANIMAL RESOURCES
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ....
  73. Host and Bacterial Factors in Disease due to H. pylori
    KATHRYN EATON; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Successful completion of these aims will lead to improved understanding of the pathogenesis of H. pylori associated disease and provide a foundation for development of novel therapies. ..
  74. Murine models to test parasite products as cures for Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    LINDA MANSFIELD; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Dr. Mansfield has documented success mentoring graduate students and seeks to expand her mentoring of D.V.M.s in mouse pathobiology. ..
  75. Recombinant murine IL-10 produced in situ by H. pylori
    KATHRYN EATON; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..pylori, but will also establish a model in which the roles of other cytokines and mediators can be determined, and host and bacterial interactions can be directly evaluated in vivo. ..
  76. Vibrio fischeri as a model of bacterial colonization
    MARGARET MC FALL NGAI; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..abstract_text> ..
  77. Microecology-murine gut-initiation & progression of IBD
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..prior and subsequent to oral vaccination with Helicobacter spp. antigens and mucosal adjuvants, elucidate how these vaccine strategies influence microflora dynamics and impact gut cytokine responses. ..
  78. Inhibiting the Inhibitor: Small Molecule Screening with Small Pox N1L
    Neal Silverman; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..Finally compounds that inhibit vaccinia virus would theoretically prevent vaccine (vaccinia) side effects. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  79. Effects of Probiotic Lactobacilli on Rotavirus Immunity
    Lijuan Yuan; Fiscal Year: 2006
    ..The findings from this study will also facilitate an understanding of the potential adjuvant effects of probiotics for development of more effective vaccines against rotavirus and other enteric virus-induced diseases. ..
  80. Development of an additive model to study the significance of heat-labile and hea
    Weiping Zhang; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]..
  81. Vibrio fischeri as a model of bacterial colonization
    MARGARET MC FALL NGAI; Fiscal Year: 2008
    ..It provides a powerful complement to the similar, yet more complex, germ-free vertebrate models of beneficial associations. ..
  82. IN VIVO PATHOGENESIS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2005
    ..pylori pathogenesis and specifically evaluate the role of regulatory T cells in limiting H. pylori-induced gastric pathology. ..
  83. Host and Bacterial Factors in Disease due to H. pylori
    KATHRYN EATON; Fiscal Year: 2004
    ..Successful completion of these aims will lead to improved understanding of the pathogenesis of H. pylori associated disease and provide a foundation for development of novel therapies. ..
  84. HELIOBACTER INDUCED HEPATITIS AND TUMORIGENESIS
    James Fox; Fiscal Year: 2001
    ..hepaticus at different stages of infection. ..
  85. PATHOGENIC MECHANISMS OF ANAEROBES IN SEPSIS
    Dennis Kasper; Fiscal Year: 2007
    ..abstract_text> ..