animal diseases

Summary

Summary: Diseases that occur in VERTEBRATE animals.

Top Publications

  1. Rich K, Perry B. The economic and poverty impacts of animal diseases in developing countries: new roles, new demands for economics and epidemiology. Prev Vet Med. 2011;101:133-47 pubmed publisher
    ..In this paper, we examine new approaches and frameworks for the analysis of economic and poverty impacts of animal diseases. We propose greater utilization of "bottom-up" analyses, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses ..
  2. Lentz J, Blackburn J, Curtis A. Evaluating patterns of a white-band disease (WBD) outbreak in Acropora palmata using spatial analysis: a comparison of transect and colony clustering. PLoS ONE. 2011;6:e21830 pubmed publisher
    ..Likewise, there is little known about the spatiality of outbreaks. We examined the spatial patterns of WBD during a 2004 outbreak at Buck Island Reef National Monument in the US Virgin Islands...
  3. Gochfeld D, Kamel H, Olson J, Thacker R. Trade-offs in defensive metabolite production but not ecological function in healthy and diseased sponges. J Chem Ecol. 2012;38:451-62 pubmed publisher
    ..cauliformis to maintain defenses against some of its natural enemies...
  4. Xu Y, Li X, Jin L, Zhen Y, Lu Y, Li S, et al. Application of chicken egg yolk immunoglobulins in the control of terrestrial and aquatic animal diseases: a review. Biotechnol Adv. 2011;29:860-8 pubmed publisher
    ..of the potential to use IgY immunotherapy for the prevention and treatment of terrestrial and aquatic animal diseases and speculates on the future of IgY technology...
  5. Warns Petit E, Morignat E, Artois M, Calavas D. Unsupervised clustering of wildlife necropsy data for syndromic surveillance. BMC Vet Res. 2010;6:56 pubmed publisher
  6. Gardner I. Quality standards are needed for reporting of test accuracy studies for animal diseases. Prev Vet Med. 2010;97:136-43 pubmed publisher
    ..Finally, the contributions of Dr. Hollis Erb to improvements in methodological and reporting qualities of test accuracy studies in Preventive Veterinary Medicine are described...
  7. Allen H. Reportable animal diseases in the United States. Zoonoses Public Health. 2012;59:44-51 pubmed publisher
    Timely reporting of animal diseases is fundamental to the detection of emerging threats, rapid and effective outbreak response, and ultimately the health of both animals and humans...
  8. Stevenson M, Sanson R, Stern M, O Leary B, Sujau M, Moles Benfell N, et al. InterSpread Plus: a spatial and stochastic simulation model of disease in animal populations. Prev Vet Med. 2013;109:10-24 pubmed publisher
  9. Zecconi A, Scali F. Staphylococcus aureus virulence factors in evasion from innate immune defenses in human and animal diseases. Immunol Lett. 2013;150:12-22 pubmed publisher
    ..aureus antimicrobial resistance. Moreover, due to the pathogen ability to manipulate the immune response, these data are needed to develop efficacious vaccines or molecules against S. aureus...

More Information

Publications75

  1. Nöremark M, Frössling J, Lewerin S. Application of routines that contribute to on-farm biosecurity as reported by Swedish livestock farmers. Transbound Emerg Dis. 2010;57:225-36 pubmed publisher
    On-farm biosecurity is important for preventing the spread of several contagious animal diseases. In this study, biosecurity routines among Swedish farmers with livestock (cattle, pigs, sheep or goats) were examined through ..
  2. McClintock B, Nichols J, Bailey L, MacKenzie D, Kendall W, Franklin A. Seeking a second opinion: uncertainty in disease ecology. Ecol Lett. 2010;13:659-74 pubmed publisher
    ..Both show that relatively simple modifications to study designs can greatly improve our understanding of complex spatio-temporal disease dynamics by rigorously accounting for uncertainty at each level of the hierarchy...
  3. Rhyan J, Spraker T. Emergence of diseases from wildlife reservoirs. Vet Pathol. 2010;47:34-9 pubmed publisher
    ..Increasing interaction between wildlife and humans or domestic animals may lead to disease emergence and require innovative methods and strategies for disease surveillance and management in wildlife...
  4. Häsler B, Howe K, Stark K. Conceptualising the technical relationship of animal disease surveillance to intervention and mitigation as a basis for economic analysis. BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:225 pubmed publisher
    ..For society to obtain the maximum benefits from using resources, the gains from disease mitigation must be compared to the resource costs, guiding decisions made with the objective of achieving the optimal net outcome...
  5. Thulke H, Eisinger D, Freuling C, Fröhlich A, Globig A, Grimm V, et al. Situation-based surveillance: adapting investigations to actual epidemic situations. J Wildl Dis. 2009;45:1089-103 pubmed
    ..Consequently, we propose and discuss a more adaptive alternative scheme of situation-based surveillance for recurrent wildlife diseases that cause readily recognizable morbidity and mortality...
  6. Hoinville L, Alban L, Drewe J, Gibbens J, Gustafson L, Hasler B, et al. Proposed terms and concepts for describing and evaluating animal-health surveillance systems. Prev Vet Med. 2013;112:1-12 pubmed publisher
    The information provided by animal-health surveillance helps to reduce the impact of animal diseases. The widespread movement of animals and their products around the world results in an increasing risk that disease will spread...
  7. Langwig K, Frick W, Bried J, Hicks A, Kunz T, Kilpatrick A. Sociality, density-dependence and microclimates determine the persistence of populations suffering from a novel fungal disease, white-nose syndrome. Ecol Lett. 2012;15:1050-7 pubmed publisher
    ..These results expand our theoretical framework and provide an empirical basis for determining which host species are likely to be driven extinct while management action is still possible...
  8. Dinsdale E, Pantos O, Smriga S, Edwards R, Angly F, Wegley L, et al. Microbial ecology of four coral atolls in the Northern Line Islands. PLoS ONE. 2008;3:e1584 pubmed publisher
    ..Obtaining the microbial data set, from atolls is particularly important given the association of microbes in the ongoing degradation of coral reef ecosystems worldwide...
  9. Lindström T, Sisson S, Nöremark M, Jonsson A, Wennergren U. Estimation of distance related probability of animal movements between holdings and implications for disease spread modeling. Prev Vet Med. 2009;91:85-94 pubmed publisher
    ..We conclude that a model with contacts being both dependent on, and independent of, distance was preferred for modeling the example animal movement contact data...
  10. Cannon R. Inspecting and monitoring on a restricted budget--where best to look?. Prev Vet Med. 2009;92:163-74 pubmed publisher
  11. Stallknecht D. Impediments to wildlife disease surveillance, research, and diagnostics. Curr Top Microbiol Immunol. 2007;315:445-61 pubmed
    ..Although such studies may be difficult, there are numerous examples of success and our understanding of wildlife and wildlife-related zoonotic and emerging disease continues to grow...
  12. Greiner M, Dekker A. On the surveillance for animal diseases in small herds. Prev Vet Med. 2005;70:223-34 pubmed
    Small herds may present a problem in surveillance for infectious animal diseases because typical levels of a within-herd design prevalence are not directly applicable...
  13. Doherr M. Brief review on the epidemiology of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). Vaccine. 2007;25:5619-24 pubmed
    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) form a group of human and animal diseases that share common features such as (a) distinct pathological lesions in the central nervous system, (b) transmissibility at least in experimental ..
  14. Lips K, Brem F, Brenes R, Reeve J, Alford R, Voyles J, et al. Emerging infectious disease and the loss of biodiversity in a Neotropical amphibian community. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006;103:3165-70 pubmed
    ..The high virulence and large number of potential hosts of this emerging infectious disease threaten global amphibian diversity...
  15. Fèvre E, Bronsvoort B, Hamilton K, Cleaveland S. Animal movements and the spread of infectious diseases. Trends Microbiol. 2006;14:125-31 pubmed
    ..Measures based on heightened surveillance are proposed that mitigate the risks of new pathogen introductions...
  16. Pedersen A, Jones K, Nunn C, Altizer S. Infectious diseases and extinction risk in wild mammals. Conserv Biol. 2007;21:1269-79 pubmed
  17. Muhammad G, Khan M, Hussain M, Iqbal Z, Iqbal M, Athar M. Ethnoveterinary practices of owners of pneumatic-cart pulling camels in Faisalabad City (Pakistan). J Ethnopharmacol. 2005;97:241-6 pubmed
    ..Firing had not been used by any owner. In general, the ethnoveterinary treatment practices used by the owners of city-dwelling camels appear to be different from those documented for the treatment of diseases of desert-dwelling camels...
  18. Skerratt L, Berger L, Hines H, McDonald K, Mendez D, Speare R. Survey protocol for detecting chytridiomycosis in all Australian frog populations. Dis Aquat Organ. 2008;80:85-94 pubmed publisher
    ..This protocol can be adapted for use in other countries and a standard protocol will enable comparison among amphibian populations globally...
  19. Stark K, Regula G, Hernandez J, Knopf L, Fuchs K, Morris R, et al. Concepts for risk-based surveillance in the field of veterinary medicine and veterinary public health: review of current approaches. BMC Health Serv Res. 2006;6:20 pubmed
    ..The rapid rate of acceptance of this core concept of risk-based surveillance has outpaced the development of its theoretical and practical bases...
  20. Pinto J, Bonacic C, Hamilton West C, Romero J, Lubroth J. Climate change and animal diseases in South America. Rev Sci Tech. 2008;27:599-613 pubmed
    Climate strongly affects agriculture and livestock production and influences animal diseases, vectors and pathogens, and their habitat...
  21. Schmitt B, Henderson L. Diagnostic tools for animal diseases. Rev Sci Tech. 2005;24:243-50 pubmed
  22. Conková E, Laciakova A, Kovac G, Seidel H. Fusarial toxins and their role in animal diseases. Vet J. 2003;165:214-20 pubmed
    ..The most important fusarial mycotoxins, their sources, and their pathology including clinical signs, necropsy findings, as well as changes in haematological, biochemical, and immunological indices, are addressed...
  23. Gudelj I, White K. Spatial heterogeneity, social structure and disease dynamics of animal populations. Theor Popul Biol. 2004;66:139-49 pubmed
    ..These profiles were not observed in previous work on an epidemic system. The results are discussed in an ecological context with reference to furious and dumb strains of infectious diseases...
  24. Palmer S, Brown D, Morgan D. Early qualitative risk assessment of the emerging zoonotic potential of animal diseases. BMJ. 2005;331:1256-60 pubmed
  25. Kriger K, Hero J. Chytridiomycosis, amphibian extinctions, and lessons for the prevention of future panzootics. Ecohealth. 2009;6:6-10 pubmed publisher
    ..Legislation to prevent the emergence of new diseases is urgently required to protect global amphibian biodiversity...
  26. Gibbens J, Robertson S, Willmington J, Milnes A, Ryan J, Wilesmith J, et al. Use of laboratory data to reduce the time taken to detect new diseases: VIDA to FarmFile. Vet Rec. 2008;162:771-6 pubmed
  27. Prattley D, Morris R, Stevenson M, Thornton R. Application of portfolio theory to risk-based allocation of surveillance resources in animal populations. Prev Vet Med. 2007;81:56-69 pubmed
    ..The appropriate level of resource investment is chosen for each disease or geographical area and time period given the degree of disease risk and uncertainty present...
  28. Siddle H, Kreiss A, Eldridge M, Noonan E, Clarke C, Pyecroft S, et al. Transmission of a fatal clonal tumor by biting occurs due to depleted MHC diversity in a threatened carnivorous marsupial. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007;104:16221-6 pubmed publisher
    ..The neoplastic clone continues to spread although the population, and, without active disease control by removal of affected animals and the isolation of disease-free animals, the Tasmanian devil faces extinction...
  29. Thurmond M. Conceptual foundations for infectious disease surveillance. J Vet Diagn Invest. 2003;15:501-14 pubmed
    ..Development of the surveillance systems needed to address emerging and foreign animal diseases will necessarily require design and architecture that are highly probability-driven to maximize surveillance ..
  30. Zinsstag J. Animal health research. Science. 2007;315:1193 pubmed
  31. Martin P, Cameron A, Greiner M. Demonstrating freedom from disease using multiple complex data sources 1: a new methodology based on scenario trees. Prev Vet Med. 2007;79:71-97 pubmed
    ..Finally, calculation of the probability of country freedom from the estimated sensitivity of the surveillance system is illustrated, incorporating the use and valuation of historical surveillance evidence...
  32. Casulli A, Manfredi M, La Rosa G, Di Cerbo A, Dinkel A, Romig T, et al. Echinococcus multilocularis in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) of the Italian Alpine region: is there a focus of autochthonous transmission?. Int J Parasitol. 2005;35:1079-83 pubmed
    ..Therefore, the question arises if we are observing an increase and expansion of foci, or if the new records are due to the more sensitive and specific methods used to detect the worm DNA...
  33. Van Metre D, Barkey D, Salman M, Morley P. Development of a syndromic surveillance system for detection of disease among livestock entering an auction market. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2009;234:658-64 pubmed publisher
    ..To develop a syndromic surveillance system based on visual inspection from outside the livestock pens that could be used for detection of disease among livestock entering an auction market...
  34. Hajkova P, Pikula J. Veterinary treatment of evening bats (Vespertilionidae) in the Czech Republic. Vet Rec. 2007;161:139-40 pubmed
  35. Antoine Moussiaux N, Faye B, Vias G. Tuareg ethnoveterinary treatments of camel diseases in Agadez area (Niger). Trop Anim Health Prod. 2007;39:83-9 pubmed
    ..This broadmindedness allows the introduction of modern veterinary medicine. Factors such as the lack of real production objectives constitute limits to this progress, however...
  36. Robert J, Morales H, Buck W, Cohen N, Marr S, Gantress J. Adaptive immunity and histopathology in frog virus 3-infected Xenopus. Virology. 2005;332:667-75 pubmed
  37. Dec M, Puchalski A. Use of oromucosally administered interferon-alpha in the prevention and treatment of animal diseases. Pol J Vet Sci. 2008;11:175-86 pubmed
    ..It is hoped that this review of the medical literature on the use of IFN-alpha in animals will give practitioners a better understanding of the challenges and benefits of using this interesting cytokine in clinical practice...
  38. Rudolf V, Antonovics J. Species coexistence and pathogens with frequency-dependent transmission. Am Nat. 2005;166:112-8 pubmed
    ..These results have important consequences for understanding the role of pathogens in species interactions and in maintaining host species diversity...
  39. Laaksonen S, Kuusela J, Nikander S, Nylund M, Oksanen A. Outbreak of parasitic peritonitis in reindeer in Finland. Vet Rec. 2007;160:835-41 pubmed
    ..There was a significant positive correlation between the worm count and the degree of peritonitis (P<0.001) and a negative correlation between the degree of peritonitis and the thickness of the back fat layer (P=0.015)...
  40. Ndiva Mongoh M, Hearne R, Khaitsa M. Private and public economic incentives for the control of animal diseases: the case of anthrax in livestock. Transbound Emerg Dis. 2008;55:319-28 pubmed publisher
    ..Another reason is to assist producers and veterinarians, and to achieve biosecurity and biosafety objectives. The contribution of each animal healthcare partner in making anthrax management a success in North Dakota is discussed...
  41. Rumbeiha W, Agnew D, Maxie G, Hoff B, Page C, Curran P, et al. Analysis of a survey database of pet food-induced poisoning in North America. J Med Toxicol. 2010;6:172-184 pubmed publisher
    ..It showed that more cats than dogs were affected and also that preexisting renal diseases and old age predicted the most severe outcome (death or euthanasia) than any other factors...
  42. Aljumaah R, Almutairi F, Ayadi M, Alshaikh M, Aljumaah A, Hussein M. Factors influencing the prevalence of subclinical mastitis in lactating dromedary camels in Riyadh Region, Saudi Arabia. Trop Anim Health Prod. 2011;43:1605-10 pubmed publisher
    ..In conclusion, subclinical mastitis is prevalent in Saudi camels, and its incidence is influenced by breed, parity, and stage of lactation. ..
  43. Loza Rubio E, Rojas Anaya E. Vaccine production in plant systems--an aid to the control of viral diseases in domestic animals: a review. Acta Vet Hung. 2010;58:511-22 pubmed publisher
    ..Some aspects of the feasibility of their use and the immune response elicited by such vaccines are also discussed, as the balance between tolerance and immunogenicity is a major concern for the use of plant-based vaccines. ..
  44. Day M. One Health: the small animal dimension. Vet Rec. 2010;167:847-9 pubmed publisher
    ..Here, Michael Day, the chairman of that committee, explains how companion animals fit within the One Health concept. ..
  45. Rebelo A, Parker L, Cai H. Use of high-resolution melting curve analysis to identify Mycoplasma species commonly isolated from ruminant, avian, and canine samples. J Vet Diagn Invest. 2011;23:932-6 pubmed publisher
    ..The real-time PCR-HRM assay developed was evaluated by testing field isolates of M. bovis, M. arginini, M. bovirhinis, M. bovigenitalium, M. iowae, and M. spumans with results consistent with those of the fluorescent antibody test...
  46. Corning S. World Organisation for Animal Health: strengthening Veterinary Services for effective One Health collaboration. Rev Sci Tech. 2014;33:639-50 pubmed
    ..b>Animal diseases, particularly those caused by new and emerging zoonotic pathogens, must be effectively controlled at their ..
  47. Raziq A, de Verdier K, Younas M. Ethnoveterinary treatments by dromedary camel herders in the Suleiman Mountainous Region in Pakistan: an observation and questionnaire study. J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2010;6:16 pubmed publisher
    ..This knowledge is rapidly disappearing and represents a cultural heritage as well as a valuable resource for attaining food security and sovereignty. ..
  48. Boëte C, Beisel U, Reis Castro L, Césard N, Reeves R. Engaging scientists: An online survey exploring the experience of innovative biotechnological approaches to controlling vector-borne diseases. Parasit Vectors. 2015;8:414 pubmed publisher
    ..has been relatively little investigation of the perceptions and awareness of scientists working on human or animal diseases transmitted by arthropods...
  49. Vandeputte S, Humblet M, Fecher Bourgeois F, Gosset C, Albert A, Vernaillen F, et al. [Economic management of health crises affecting production animals in Europe]. Rev Sci Tech. 2011;30:683-701 pubmed
    ..A classification of diseases would harmonise the situation at the European level. ..
  50. Brearley G, Rhodes J, Bradley A, Baxter G, Seabrook L, Lunney D, et al. Wildlife disease prevalence in human-modified landscapes. Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2013;88:427-42 pubmed publisher
    ..A better understanding of the various mechanisms linking human-induced landscape change and the prevalence of wildlife disease will lead to more successful conservation management outcomes. ..
  51. Brückner G. The role of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) to facilitate the international trade in animals and animal products. Onderstepoort J Vet Res. 2009;76:141-6 pubmed
  52. Deakin J, Bender H, Pearse A, Rens W, O Brien P, Ferguson Smith M, et al. Genomic restructuring in the Tasmanian devil facial tumour: chromosome painting and gene mapping provide clues to evolution of a transmissible tumour. PLoS Genet. 2012;8:e1002483 pubmed publisher
    ..Differences between strains are limited, reflecting the unusually stable nature of DFTD. Finally, our detailed maps of both the devil and tumour karyotypes provide a physical framework for future genomic investigations into DFTD...
  53. Reeves A, Salman M, Hill A. Approaches for evaluating veterinary epidemiological models: verification, validation and limitations. Rev Sci Tech. 2011;30:499-512 pubmed
    The evaluation of models of the spread and control of animal diseases is crucial if these models are to be used to inform decisions about the control or management of such diseases...
  54. Dufour B, Plée L, Moutou F, Boisseleau D, Chartier C, Durand B, et al. A qualitative risk assessment methodology for scientific expert panels. Rev Sci Tech. 2011;30:673-81 pubmed
    ..The authors describe a new set of levels for probabilities, as well as the items considered when addressing either animal or human health consequences...
  55. Wolfe B, Lamberski N. Approaches to management and care of the neonatal nondomestic ruminant. Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract. 2012;15:265-77 pubmed publisher
  56. Love D, Rodman S, Neff R, Nachman K. Veterinary drug residues in seafood inspected by the European Union, United States, Canada, and Japan from 2000 to 2009. Environ Sci Technol. 2011;45:7232-40 pubmed publisher
    ..Increased transparency could facilitate a more rigorous characterization of public health risks from consuming imported seafood...
  57. Neal A. Male gametocyte fecundity and sex ratio of a malaria parasite, Plasmodium mexicanum. Parasitology. 2011;138:1203-10 pubmed publisher
  58. Hartley M, Lysons R. Development of the England Wildlife Health Strategy--a framework for decision makers. Vet Rec. 2011;168:158 pubmed publisher
    ..The EWHS was published in June 2009 and provides a framework for a generic four-stage approach to wildlife health that can be adopted by decision makers both within and outside government...
  59. Nöremark M, Frössling J, Lewerin S. A survey of visitors on Swedish livestock farms with reference to the spread of animal diseases. BMC Vet Res. 2013;9:184 pubmed publisher
    ..livestock movements, other between-farm contacts such as visitors may contribute to the spread of contagious animal diseases. Knowledge about such contacts is essential for contingency planning...
  60. Domingues L, Cesar J, Fassa A, Domingues M. [Responsible pet animal guardianship in the urban area of the municipality of Pelotas in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil]. Cien Saude Colet. 2015;20:185-92 pubmed publisher
    ..The results of this study point to the need for public policies that instruct the population on responsible guardianship, and that offer immunizations and sterilization services for animals. ..
  61. Conrad P, Mazet J, Clifford D, Scott C, Wilkes M. Evolution of a transdisciplinary "One Medicine-One Health" approach to global health education at the University of California, Davis. Prev Vet Med. 2009;92:268-74 pubmed publisher
  62. Pittalis S, Meschi S, Castilletti M, Di Caro A, Puro V. [Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever: an enemy at the gates]. Infez Med. 2009;17:133-40 pubmed
    ..The recent increase in the number of cases in Eastern Europe and the potential for nosocomial outbreaks indicate the advisability of diagnosis in every patient hospitalized in Italy with haemorrhagic fever...
  63. Houe H, Egenvall A, Virtala A, Olafsson T, Østerås O. Databases in veterinary medicine - validation, harmonisation and application: introduction. Acta Vet Scand. 2011;53 Suppl 1:S1 pubmed publisher
  64. Lynch J, Silva P. Integrating animal health and food safety surveillance data from slaughterhouse control. Rev Sci Tech. 2013;32:409-16 pubmed
    ..A strong case can be made that the complementary pursuit of both sustainable animal health and food safety can continue to be aided by surveillance at the slaughterhouse level...
  65. Jensen V, Sommer H, Struve T, Clausen J, Chriél M. Factors associated with usage of antimicrobials in commercial mink (Neovison vison) production in Denmark. Prev Vet Med. 2016;126:170-82 pubmed publisher
    ..Herd size is associated with different prescription patterns. Finally, infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, astrovirus, influenza virus and Salmonella spp. was associated with an increase in antimicrobial use. ..
  66. Reusken C, Schilp C, Raj V, de Bruin E, Kohl R, Farag E, et al. MERS-CoV Infection of Alpaca in a Region Where MERS-CoV is Endemic. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22:1129-31 pubmed publisher