Ph IV NICHD Study of Early ChildCare & Youth Developme*

Summary

Principal Investigator: Laurence Steinberg
Affiliation: Temple University
Country: USA
Abstract: [unreadable] DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): This is an application to extend the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD) into its fourth phase. The SECCYD is a collaborative, prospective, longitudinal study of a cohort of 1,073 adolescents and their families, first enrolled at one month of age and studied intensively through sixth grade in Phase lll of this cooperative agreement. The primary study aims of Phase IV are (1) to investigate how earlier functioning and experiences, in concert with contextual and maturational factors in adolescence, influence social relationships, health, adjustment, and intellectual and academic development during middle adolescence; and (2) to extend into middle adolescence an intensive and extensive study of patterns of health and human development from infancy onward, which can be used by the broader scientific community to study a wide range of basic and applied questions. Primary data collection in Phase IV occurs when the adolescents are 15 years old, and again, at 16. At 15, a home visit occurs in which parent-adolescent interactions are videotaped and the adolescents and their parents (or parental figures) complete questionnaires and structured interviews. During lab visits at ages 15 and 16, adolescents' achievement is assessed and adolescents complete self-report measures. The age 15 data collection also includes an extensive assessment of the adolescent's cognitive functioning, cortisol reactivity, and physical activity. In addition, yearly examinations of pubertal status and health are conducted. Finally school personnel complete questionnaires and adolescents' school transcripts are coded at the end of middle school and Grade 10. These data, in concert with data from earlier Phases, will be used to test four models of developmental processes. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]
Funding Period: 1989-05-01 - 2008-12-31
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Children with autism illuminate the role of social intention in word learning
    Julia Parish-Morris
    Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 6085, USA
    Child Dev 78:1265-87. 2007
  2. pmc Dopaminergic, serotonergic, and oxytonergic candidate genes associated with infant attachment security and disorganization? In search of main and interaction effects
    Maartje P C M Luijk
    Center for Child and Family Studies, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 52:1295-307. 2011
  3. pmc Individual differences in boys' and girls' timing and tempo of puberty: modeling development with nonlinear growth models
    Kristine Marceau
    Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University, 228 Moore Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    Dev Psychol 47:1389-409. 2011
  4. doi Elevated trajectories of externalizing problems are associated with lower awakening cortisol levels in midadolescence
    John D Haltigan
    Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA
    Dev Psychol 47:472-8. 2011
  5. doi Infant attachment security and the timing of puberty: testing an evolutionary hypothesis
    Jay Belsky
    Institute for the Study of Children, Families and Social Issues, Birkbeck University of London, London, United Kingdom
    Psychol Sci 21:1195-201. 2010
  6. pmc Family socioeconomic status and consistent environmental stimulation in early childhood
    Robert Crosnoe
    Department of Sociology and Population ResearchCenter, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station A1700, Austin, TX 78712 1088, USA
    Child Dev 81:972-87. 2010
  7. doi Is adolescence-onset antisocial behavior developmentally normative?
    Glenn I Roisman
    Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 603 East Daniel Street, Champaign, IL 61820, USA
    Dev Psychopathol 22:295-311. 2010
  8. pmc Infants discriminate manners and paths in non-linguistic dynamic events
    Rachel Pulverman
    Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
    Cognition 108:825-30. 2008
  9. ncbi Child care effects in context: quality, stability, and multiplicity in non-maternal child care arrangements during the first 15 months of life
    Henry Tran
    Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 22030, USA
    Dev Psychol 42:566-82. 2006
  10. ncbi The birth of words: ten-month-olds learn words through perceptual salience
    Shannon M Pruden
    Temple University, PA 19122, USA
    Child Dev 77:266-80. 2006

Scientific Experts

  • Henry Tran
  • Glenn I Roisman
  • J Belsky
  • Robert Crosnoe
  • John D Haltigan
  • Rachel Pulverman
  • Maartje P C M Luijk
  • Kristine Marceau
  • Julia Parish-Morris
  • Roberta Michnick Golinkoff
  • Elizabeth A Hennon
  • Kathy Hirsh-Pasek
  • Shannon M Pruden
  • Danielle Horvath Dallaire
  • Marian J Bakermans-Kranenburg
  • Frank C Verhulst
  • Kevin J Grimm
  • Albert Hofman
  • Henning Tiemeier
  • Andre G Uitterlinden
  • Vincent W V Jaddoe
  • Cathryn Booth-LaForce
  • Marinus H van IJzendoorn
  • Anne Tharner
  • Elizabeth J Susman
  • Renate M Houts
  • Nilam Ram
  • Helen Tager-Flusberg
  • Marsha Weinraub

Detail Information

Publications15

  1. ncbi Children with autism illuminate the role of social intention in word learning
    Julia Parish-Morris
    Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 6085, USA
    Child Dev 78:1265-87. 2007
    ....
  2. pmc Dopaminergic, serotonergic, and oxytonergic candidate genes associated with infant attachment security and disorganization? In search of main and interaction effects
    Maartje P C M Luijk
    Center for Child and Family Studies, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands
    J Child Psychol Psychiatry 52:1295-307. 2011
    ..Parenting was assessed using observational rating scales for parental sensitivity (Ainsworth, Bell, & Stayton, 1974), and infant attachment was assessed with the Strange Situation Procedure...
  3. pmc Individual differences in boys' and girls' timing and tempo of puberty: modeling development with nonlinear growth models
    Kristine Marceau
    Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University, 228 Moore Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    Dev Psychol 47:1389-409. 2011
    ..Results highlight the importance of considering the nonlinear nature of puberty and expand the repertoire of possibilities for examining important aspects of how and when pubertal processes contribute to development...
  4. doi Elevated trajectories of externalizing problems are associated with lower awakening cortisol levels in midadolescence
    John D Haltigan
    Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA
    Dev Psychol 47:472-8. 2011
    ....
  5. doi Infant attachment security and the timing of puberty: testing an evolutionary hypothesis
    Jay Belsky
    Institute for the Study of Children, Families and Social Issues, Birkbeck University of London, London, United Kingdom
    Psychol Sci 21:1195-201. 2010
    ..These results support a conditional-adaptational view of individual differences in attachment security and raise questions about the biological mechanisms responsible for the attachment effects we discerned...
  6. pmc Family socioeconomic status and consistent environmental stimulation in early childhood
    Robert Crosnoe
    Department of Sociology and Population ResearchCenter, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station A1700, Austin, TX 78712 1088, USA
    Child Dev 81:972-87. 2010
    ..The observed benefits of consistent environmental stimulation tended to be more pronounced for low-income children...
  7. doi Is adolescence-onset antisocial behavior developmentally normative?
    Glenn I Roisman
    Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 603 East Daniel Street, Champaign, IL 61820, USA
    Dev Psychopathol 22:295-311. 2010
    ..Findings generally replicated across sex and did not vary as a function of whether antisocial behavior groups were defined using T-scores normed within sex or identified using an empirically driven grouping method applied to raw data...
  8. pmc Infants discriminate manners and paths in non-linguistic dynamic events
    Rachel Pulverman
    Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
    Cognition 108:825-30. 2008
    ..Both English- and Spanish-learning infants attended to changes of manner and changes of path. Thus, infants from two different language communities proved sensitive to components of events that undergird relational term learning...
  9. ncbi Child care effects in context: quality, stability, and multiplicity in non-maternal child care arrangements during the first 15 months of life
    Henry Tran
    Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 22030, USA
    Dev Psychol 42:566-82. 2006
    ....
  10. ncbi The birth of words: ten-month-olds learn words through perceptual salience
    Shannon M Pruden
    Temple University, PA 19122, USA
    Child Dev 77:266-80. 2006
    ..This is in direct contrast to the way in which older children (12-, 18-, and 24-month-olds) learn and extend new object names...
  11. ncbi Predicting children's separation anxiety at age 6: the contributions of infant-mother attachment security, maternal sensitivity, and maternal separation anxiety
    Danielle Horvath Dallaire
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203, USA
    Attach Hum Dev 7:393-408. 2005
    ..Mediation tests show that the effect of mother's separation anxiety on children's separation anxiety may be mediated by maternal sensitivity. Research and clinical implications are discussed...