Ph IV NICHD Study of Early ChildCare & Youth Developme*

Summary

Principal Investigator: Laurence Steinberg
Affiliation: Temple University
Country: USA
Abstract: This is an application to extend the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD) into its fourth phase. The SECCYD is a collaborative, prospective, longitudinal study of a cohort of 1,073 adolescents and their families, first enrolled at one month of age and studied intensively through sixth grade in Phase lll of this cooperative agreement. The primary study aims of Phase IV are (1) to investigate how earlier functioning and experiences, in concert with contextual and maturational factors in adolescence, influence social relationships, health, adjustment, and intellectual and academic development during middle adolescence; and (2) to extend into middle adolescence an intensive and extensive study of patterns of health and human development from infancy onward, which can be used by the broader scientific community to study a wide range of basic and applied questions. Primary data collection in Phase IV occurs when the adolescents are 15 years old, and again, at 16. At 15, a home visit occurs in which parent-adolescent interactions are videotaped and the adolescents and their parents (or parental figures) complete questionnaires and structured interviews. During lab visits at ages 15 and 16, adolescents' achievement is assessed and adolescents complete self-report measures. The age 15 data collection also includes an extensive assessment of the adolescent's cognitive functioning, cortisol reactivity, and physical activity. In addition, yearly examinations of pubertal status and health are conducted. Finally school personnel complete questionnaires and adolescents' school transcripts are coded at the end of middle school and Grade 10. These data, in concert with data from earlier Phases, will be used to test four models of developmental processes.
Funding Period: 1989-05-01 - 2008-12-31
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Predicting children's separation anxiety at age 6: the contributions of infant-mother attachment security, maternal sensitivity, and maternal separation anxiety
    Danielle Horvath Dallaire
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203, USA
    Attach Hum Dev 7:393-408. 2005
  2. ncbi The birth of words: ten-month-olds learn words through perceptual salience
    Shannon M Pruden
    Temple University, PA 19122, USA
    Child Dev 77:266-80. 2006
  3. ncbi Child care effects in context: quality, stability, and multiplicity in non-maternal child care arrangements during the first 15 months of life
    Henry Tran
    Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 22030, USA
    Dev Psychol 42:566-82. 2006
  4. pmc Infants discriminate manners and paths in non-linguistic dynamic events
    Rachel Pulverman
    Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
    Cognition 108:825-30. 2008

Scientific Experts

  • Henry Tran
  • Rachel Pulverman
  • Shannon M Pruden
  • Danielle Horvath Dallaire
  • Kathy Hirsh-Pasek
  • Elizabeth A Hennon
  • Roberta Michnick Golinkoff
  • Marsha Weinraub

Detail Information

Publications5

  1. ncbi Predicting children's separation anxiety at age 6: the contributions of infant-mother attachment security, maternal sensitivity, and maternal separation anxiety
    Danielle Horvath Dallaire
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203, USA
    Attach Hum Dev 7:393-408. 2005
    ..Mediation tests show that the effect of mother's separation anxiety on children's separation anxiety may be mediated by maternal sensitivity. Research and clinical implications are discussed...
  2. ncbi The birth of words: ten-month-olds learn words through perceptual salience
    Shannon M Pruden
    Temple University, PA 19122, USA
    Child Dev 77:266-80. 2006
    ..This is in direct contrast to the way in which older children (12-, 18-, and 24-month-olds) learn and extend new object names...
  3. ncbi Child care effects in context: quality, stability, and multiplicity in non-maternal child care arrangements during the first 15 months of life
    Henry Tran
    Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 22030, USA
    Dev Psychol 42:566-82. 2006
    ....
  4. pmc Infants discriminate manners and paths in non-linguistic dynamic events
    Rachel Pulverman
    Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
    Cognition 108:825-30. 2008
    ..Both English- and Spanish-learning infants attended to changes of manner and changes of path. Thus, infants from two different language communities proved sensitive to components of events that undergird relational term learning...