Men's Migration and Women's HIV/AIDS Risks in Mozambique

Summary

Principal Investigator: Victor Agadjanian
Affiliation: Arizona State University
Country: USA
Abstract: [unreadable] DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): This exploratory project will help to better understand the links between married men's migration from rural areas and the exposure of their wives to HIV/AIDS risks in sub-Saharan Africa. Migration is commonly implicated as an important factor in the spread of HIV/AIDS, but most attention has been focused on the HIV/AIDS risks of migrants, primarily men, in cities and other destination areas. Relatively little systematic information exists about migrants' wives remaining in rural areas and their exposure to both infection risks and information on prevention relative to women whose husbands do not migrate. Migration may affect women's HIV/AIDS views and risks directly-through their relationships with their migrant husbands. Yet, migration may also affect women's HIV/AIDS knowledge and risk exposure indirectly-by transforming their marital unions, altering their social and economic constraints and opportunities, and reconfiguring their social and sexual networks. These changes may encourage and/or facilitate women's extramarital partnerships, but at the same time, may give them greater ability to avoid risky sex with both their marital and extramarital partners. In exploring these complex direct and indirect effects, the proposed project will test a novel conceptual model of rural women's HIV/AIDS risks and prevention and assess the feasibility of a study design involving collection and analysis of mutually complementary quantitative and qualitative data. The project will be conducted in the south of Mozambique, an area with high levels of labor out-migration and rising HIV prevalence. Specifically, the project will: investigate the effects of men's migration on their marital unions and on their wives' economic security, social autonomy, and social networks; compare wives of migrant and non-migrant men with respect to HIV/AIDS awareness and risk perceptions; and compare wives of migrant and non-migrant men with respect to exposure to HIV infection risks and practice of prevention. To achieve its aims, the project will include a complementary mix of quantitative and qualitative methods: a representative survey of married and women in four rural districts and a series of in-depth interviews with a subsample of survey respondents. The results of this research will advance our knowledge of the social factors shaping the HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. They will also provide invaluable information for interventions aimed at reducing HIV/AIDS risks among rural African women. [unreadable] [unreadable] [unreadable]
Funding Period: 2006-05-15 - 2009-04-30
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Labor migration and child mortality in Mozambique
    Scott T Yabiku
    Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, United States
    Soc Sci Med 75:2530-8. 2012
  2. pmc Men's migration, women's personal networks, and responses to HIV/AIDS in Mozambique
    Winfred Avogo
    Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Illinois State University, Campus Box 4660, Normal Illinois, IL 61790, USA
    Int J Environ Res Public Health 10:892-912. 2013
  3. doi A geographical perspective on access to sexual and reproductive health care for women in rural Africa
    Jing Yao
    Centre for GeoInformatics, School of Geography and Geosciences, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9AL, Scotland, UK Electronic address
    Soc Sci Med 96:60-8. 2013
  4. pmc Husbands' labour migration and wives' autonomy, Mozambique 2000-2006
    Scott T Yabiku
    Center for Population Dynamics and School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University, Box 873701, Tempe, AZ 85287 3701, USA
    Popul Stud (Camb) 64:293-306. 2010
  5. pmc Men's migration and women's fertility in rural Mozambique
    Victor Agadjanian
    School of Social and Family Dynamics, and Center for Population Dynamics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 3701, USA
    Demography 48:1029-48. 2011
  6. ncbi Childbearing in crisis: war, migration and fertility in Angola
    Winfred Avogo
    School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University, Tempe, USA
    J Biosoc Sci 40:725-42. 2008

Scientific Experts

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. pmc Labor migration and child mortality in Mozambique
    Scott T Yabiku
    Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, United States
    Soc Sci Med 75:2530-8. 2012
    ..Our results illustrate the need to account for the diversity of men's labor migration experience in examining the effects of migration on left-behind households...
  2. pmc Men's migration, women's personal networks, and responses to HIV/AIDS in Mozambique
    Winfred Avogo
    Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Illinois State University, Campus Box 4660, Normal Illinois, IL 61790, USA
    Int J Environ Res Public Health 10:892-912. 2013
    ..Finally, we detect that network members' prevention behavior was similar to respondents', although this did not depend on migration. We contextualize these findings within the literature and discuss their policy implications...
  3. doi A geographical perspective on access to sexual and reproductive health care for women in rural Africa
    Jing Yao
    Centre for GeoInformatics, School of Geography and Geosciences, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9AL, Scotland, UK Electronic address
    Soc Sci Med 96:60-8. 2013
    ..Spatial disparities in geographic access among different population groups also appear to exist, likely affecting overall program success. ..
  4. pmc Husbands' labour migration and wives' autonomy, Mozambique 2000-2006
    Scott T Yabiku
    Center for Population Dynamics and School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University, Box 873701, Tempe, AZ 85287 3701, USA
    Popul Stud (Camb) 64:293-306. 2010
    ..This is consistent with the assumption that the migrant's absence has a 'direct' effect on his wife's autonomy...
  5. pmc Men's migration and women's fertility in rural Mozambique
    Victor Agadjanian
    School of Social and Family Dynamics, and Center for Population Dynamics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 3701, USA
    Demography 48:1029-48. 2011
    ..We interpret these results in light of the debate on enhancing versus disrupting effects of labor migration on families and households in contemporary developing settings...
  6. ncbi Childbearing in crisis: war, migration and fertility in Angola
    Winfred Avogo
    School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University, Tempe, USA
    J Biosoc Sci 40:725-42. 2008
    ..Interpretations of the results are offered in the context of Angola and their broader implications are reflected on...