Control of Repetitive Movement in Parkinson's Disease

Summary

Principal Investigator: Colum MacKinnon
Affiliation: Northwestern University
Country: USA
Abstract: Parkinson's disease (PD) affects more than a million people in the United States. Voluntary movement in these patients is characterized by slowness and reduced movement amplitude (bradykinesia) and a lack of spontaneous volitional movement (akinesia). The severity of bradykinesia increases with disease progression and has a significant impact on quality of life. Bradykinesia is most evident during the performance of fast repetitive movements and worsened when external cues are removed. The purpose of this project is to examine the mechanisms contributing to impaired repetitive movement in patients with PD and the effects of the two most successful treatments for PD, levodopa and high frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS), on these mechanisms. The first specific aim will examine the effects of movement cueing (external vs. internal cues), frequency (0.8 Hz vs. 2 Hz) and levodopa on repetitive finger movement and movement-related cortical oscillations recorded using electroencephalography (EEC). The second specific aim will examine the effects of the same factors (cueing, movement frequency and levodopa) on the patterns of movement-related activity in the basal ganglia (a group of deep brain structures) of awake patients with PD. Basal ganglia activity will be recorded from electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of patients with PD. The third specific aim will compare the effects of levodopa versus STN-DBS on movement-related cortical oscillations. High-resolution EEC recordings of motor cortical activity will be used to examine how these treatments affect repetitive movement. These experiments will be the first to examine the neurophysiological basis for the deterioration of motor performance during repetitive movements in PD and the cortical mechanisms by which levodopa and STN-DBS improve the performance of these movements. The long-term goals of this project are twofold: to develop improved rehabilitation techniques that take advantage of factors that facilitate movement performance and to develop improved methods for the delivery of deep brain stimulation. Dysfunction of the basal ganglia is implicated in a variety of neurological disorders, including PD, that affect a large segment of the US population. This project is relevant to public health because the findings will provide a better understanding of the human basal ganglia and its role in the production of disordered movement and help to develop improved treatments.
Funding Period: 2006-05-25 - 2010-04-30
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Early and unintentional release of planned motor actions during motor cortical preparation
    Colum D MacKinnon
    Department of Neurology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e63417. 2013
  2. ncbi Deep brain stimulation improves movement amplitude but not hastening of repetitive finger movements
    Elizabeth L Stegemoller
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Electronic address
    Neurosci Lett 552:135-9. 2013
  3. pmc Time-frequency analysis of movement-related spectral power in EEG during repetitive movements: a comparison of methods
    David P Allen
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 645 N Michigan Avenue, Suite 1100, Chicago, IL 60611, USA
    J Neurosci Methods 186:107-15. 2010
  4. pmc Motor preparation is modulated by the resolution of the response timing information
    Anthony N Carlsen
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 645 N Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60611, USA
    Brain Res 1322:38-49. 2010
  5. pmc Suppression of deep brain stimulation artifacts from the electroencephalogram by frequency-domain Hampel filtering
    David P Allen
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL IL 60611, USA
    Clin Neurophysiol 121:1227-32. 2010
  6. pmc Rate-dependent impairments in repetitive finger movements in patients with Parkinson's disease are not due to peripheral fatigue
    Elizabeth L Stegemoller
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA
    Neurosci Lett 482:1-6. 2010
  7. pmc Effect of movement frequency on repetitive finger movements in patients with Parkinson's disease
    Elizabeth L Stegemoller
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611, USA
    Mov Disord 24:1162-9. 2009
  8. pmc The effects of Parkinson's disease and age on syncopated finger movements
    Elizabeth L Stegemoller
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA
    Brain Res 1290:12-20. 2009

Scientific Experts

  • David P Allen
  • Anthony N Carlsen
  • Elizabeth L Stegemoller
  • Colum D MacKinnon
  • Tanya Simuni
  • Cindy Zadikoff
  • Joshua M Rosenow
  • Takako Shiratori
  • Mark W Rogers
  • Colum MacKinnon

Detail Information

Publications8

  1. pmc Early and unintentional release of planned motor actions during motor cortical preparation
    Colum D MacKinnon
    Department of Neurology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e63417. 2013
    ....
  2. ncbi Deep brain stimulation improves movement amplitude but not hastening of repetitive finger movements
    Elizabeth L Stegemoller
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Electronic address
    Neurosci Lett 552:135-9. 2013
    ..Separately testing movement amplitude and movement rate using both high and low rate externally paced cues in the clinical environment may aid in the diagnosis and treatment of people with Parkinson's disease...
  3. pmc Time-frequency analysis of movement-related spectral power in EEG during repetitive movements: a comparison of methods
    David P Allen
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 645 N Michigan Avenue, Suite 1100, Chicago, IL 60611, USA
    J Neurosci Methods 186:107-15. 2010
    ....
  4. pmc Motor preparation is modulated by the resolution of the response timing information
    Anthony N Carlsen
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 645 N Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60611, USA
    Brain Res 1322:38-49. 2010
    ....
  5. pmc Suppression of deep brain stimulation artifacts from the electroencephalogram by frequency-domain Hampel filtering
    David P Allen
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL IL 60611, USA
    Clin Neurophysiol 121:1227-32. 2010
    ..A filtering method is presented that removes these artifacts whilst preserving the spectral and temporal fidelity of the underlying EEG...
  6. pmc Rate-dependent impairments in repetitive finger movements in patients with Parkinson's disease are not due to peripheral fatigue
    Elizabeth L Stegemoller
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA
    Neurosci Lett 482:1-6. 2010
    ....
  7. pmc Effect of movement frequency on repetitive finger movements in patients with Parkinson's disease
    Elizabeth L Stegemoller
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611, USA
    Mov Disord 24:1162-9. 2009
    ....
  8. pmc The effects of Parkinson's disease and age on syncopated finger movements
    Elizabeth L Stegemoller
    Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA
    Brain Res 1290:12-20. 2009
    ....