UNCONSCIOUS AND IMPLICIT COGNITION

Summary

Principal Investigator: Anthony Greenwald
Affiliation: University of Washington
Country: USA
Abstract: DESCRIPTION (Applicant's Abstract): This research examines the capabilities and limitations of cognition initiated by visual 'subliminal' stimuli. These are visual stimuli presented so as to evade conscious attention. The proposed research gives special attention to types of subliminal presentations that are now easily achievable in the mass media of TV and film. Since the mid-1950s, broad and generally unsubstantiated claims of effective therapeutic or other influence by visual subliminal stimuli have appeared in popular press, entertainment media, and marketplace. Until the mid-1980s, scientific evaluation of those claims was severely restricted by scientists' studied avoidance of the topic because of its air of disreputability, and by unavailability of research methods that could decisively evaluate claims. Previous work on this project has contributed to overcoming both of these constraints. The proposed research carries forward these gains by (a) testing for possible cumulative effects of several types of repeated subliminal visual presentations, (b) applying methods developed in the project's previous studies of subliminal text stimuli to test for effects of subliminal graphic/pictorial stimuli, (c) locating the currently elusive upper bound of analytic capability of cognition in response to subliminal stimuli, (d) extending the project's methods for appraising the time course of cognitive processing of subliminal stimuli to supraliminal stimuli, (e) seeking to reconcile competing published claims concerning temporal persistence of effects of subliminal visual stimuli, and (f) developing a diagnostic procedure that can provide comparative appraisal of theorized attitude conditioning procedures.
Funding Period: 1988-02-01 - 2004-04-30
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Understanding and using the Implicit Association Test: II. Method variables and construct validity
    Brian A Nosek
    Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Box 400400, Charlottesville, VA 22911, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 31:166-80. 2005
  2. ncbi A reminder about procedures needed to reliably produce perfect timesharing: comment on Lien, McCann, Ruthruff, and Proctor (2005)
    Anthony G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 1525, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 31:221-5. 2005
  3. ncbi Clarifying the role of the "other" category in the self-esteem IAT
    Brad Pinter
    The Pennsylvania State University, Altoona College, Altoona, PA 16601, USA
    Exp Psychol 52:74-9. 2005
  4. ncbi Validity of the salience asymmetry interpretation of the implicit association test: comment on Rothermund and Wentura (2004)
    Anthony G Greenwald
    University of Washington, Department of Psychology, Seattle, WA 98195 1525, USA
    J Exp Psychol Gen 134:420-5; author reply 426-30. 2005
  5. doi Understanding and using the Implicit Association Test: III. Meta-analysis of predictive validity
    Anthony G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 97:17-41. 2009

Detail Information

Publications5

  1. ncbi Understanding and using the Implicit Association Test: II. Method variables and construct validity
    Brian A Nosek
    Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Box 400400, Charlottesville, VA 22911, USA
    Pers Soc Psychol Bull 31:166-80. 2005
    ..Together, these analyses provide additional construct validation for the IAT and suggest practical guidelines to users of the IAT...
  2. ncbi A reminder about procedures needed to reliably produce perfect timesharing: comment on Lien, McCann, Ruthruff, and Proctor (2005)
    Anthony G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 1525, USA
    J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 31:221-5. 2005
    ..Also discussed here are problems in M.-C. Lien et al.'s (2005) analysis of slopes relating Task 2 latency to Task 1 latency and their advocacy of a central bottleneck theory that may not be disconfirmable...
  3. ncbi Clarifying the role of the "other" category in the self-esteem IAT
    Brad Pinter
    The Pennsylvania State University, Altoona College, Altoona, PA 16601, USA
    Exp Psychol 52:74-9. 2005
    ..Choice of the appropriate other category to contrast with self in self-esteem IATs should be guided by the needs of the research question being addressed...
  4. ncbi Validity of the salience asymmetry interpretation of the implicit association test: comment on Rothermund and Wentura (2004)
    Anthony G Greenwald
    University of Washington, Department of Psychology, Seattle, WA 98195 1525, USA
    J Exp Psychol Gen 134:420-5; author reply 426-30. 2005
    ....
  5. doi Understanding and using the Implicit Association Test: III. Meta-analysis of predictive validity
    Anthony G Greenwald
    Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
    J Pers Soc Psychol 97:17-41. 2009
    ..The more highly IAT and self-report measures were intercorrelated, the greater was the predictive validity of each...