TOMOGRAPHIC DOSIMETRY PHANTOMS FOR PEDIATRIC RADIOLOGY

Summary

Principal Investigator: W E Bolch
Abstract: DESCRIPTION (Adapted from Applicant's Abstract): Both fluoroscopy and computed tomography are becoming increasingly utilized in pediatric medicine. Quantitative methods for determining organ dose in pediatric patients are thus essential for clinical decision-making and risk assessment. Even approximate methods of risk assessment, based upon measures of entrance dose or energy imparted, fundamentally rely upon knowledge or organ dose. Organ doses may be determined through either computational simulation of the diagnostic exam using anthropomorphic models, or through the use of dosimeters embedded within anthropomorphic physical phantoms. Anthropomorphic computational models may be further classified as either stylized models, where organs are delineated by 3D surface equations, or tomographic models, in which organs are determined from segmented CT or MRI images. In this project, the investigators will develop improved techniques for estimating organ doses to the newborn child in both fluoroscopic and CT examinations. The project Specific Aims are: 1) to construct a high-resolution, segmented tomographic computational model of a newborn child using helical CT images of live newborns. The model will be scaled to match the dimensions and organ masses of the MIRD newborn model; 2) to construct a high-resolution tomographic physical phantom of a live newborn using the identical CT data and also scaled to match the MIRD newborn model. A full-scale physical phantom of the stylized MIRD model will also be constructed. Internal organ doses will be assessed using embedded high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters; 3) to determine organ doses in the newborn child received during fluoroscopic and CT examinations using both the computational model and physical phantoms developed in Specific Aims 1 and 2, respectively; and 4) to evaluate the degree to which improved anatomic representation, in either computational models or physical phantoms, influences estimates of organ dose in newborn radiological examinations.
Funding Period: 2000-05-01 - 2004-04-30
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. ncbi Whole-body voxel phantoms of paediatric patients--UF Series B
    Choonik Lee
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Phys Med Biol 51:4649-61. 2006
  2. ncbi Age-dependent organ and effective dose coefficients for external photons: a comparison of stylized and voxel-based paediatric phantoms
    Choonik Lee
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Phys Med Biol 51:4663-88. 2006
  3. ncbi Organ and effective doses in newborn patients during helical multislice computed tomography examination
    Robert J Staton
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Phys Med Biol 51:5151-66. 2006
  4. ncbi Tomographic physical phantom of the newborn child with real-time dosimetry I. Methods and techniques for construction
    A K Jones
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 8300, USA
    Med Phys 33:3274-82. 2006
  5. ncbi A tomographic physical phantom of the newborn child with real-time dosimetry. II. Scaling factors for calculation of mean organ dose in pediatric radiography
    Robert J Staton
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 8300, USA
    Med Phys 33:3283-9. 2006
  6. ncbi An assessment of bone marrow and bone endosteum dosimetry methods for photon sources
    Choonik Lee
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 8300, USA
    Phys Med Biol 51:5391-407. 2006
  7. ncbi Organ and effective doses in newborns and infants undergoing voiding cystourethrograms (VCUG): a comparison of stylized and tomographic phantoms
    Frank D Pazik
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 8300, USA
    Med Phys 34:294-306. 2007
  8. ncbi Organ and effective doses in infants undergoing upper gastrointestinal (UGI) fluoroscopic examination
    Robert J Staton
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 8300, USA
    Med Phys 34:703-10. 2007
  9. ncbi Organ and effective doses in pediatric patients undergoing helical multislice computed tomography examination
    Choonik Lee
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 8300, USA
    Med Phys 34:1858-73. 2007

Detail Information

Publications9

  1. ncbi Whole-body voxel phantoms of paediatric patients--UF Series B
    Choonik Lee
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Phys Med Biol 51:4649-61. 2006
    ..86 mm x 0.86 mm x 3.0 mm, 0.90 mm x 0.90 mm x 5.0 mm, 1.16 mm x 1.16 mm x 6.0 mm, 0.94 mm x 0.94 mm x 6.00 mm and 1.18 mm x 1.18 mm x 6.72 mm, respectively...
  2. ncbi Age-dependent organ and effective dose coefficients for external photons: a comparison of stylized and voxel-based paediatric phantoms
    Choonik Lee
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Phys Med Biol 51:4663-88. 2006
    ....
  3. ncbi Organ and effective doses in newborn patients during helical multislice computed tomography examination
    Robert J Staton
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
    Phys Med Biol 51:5151-66. 2006
    ..For all scans, the effective dose was found to range approximately 1-13 mSv across the scan parameters and scan regions. The largest effective dose occurred for CAP scans at 120 kVp...
  4. ncbi Tomographic physical phantom of the newborn child with real-time dosimetry I. Methods and techniques for construction
    A K Jones
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 8300, USA
    Med Phys 33:3274-82. 2006
    ..Included in this paper are images detailing the construction process, and images of the completed phantom...
  5. ncbi A tomographic physical phantom of the newborn child with real-time dosimetry. II. Scaling factors for calculation of mean organ dose in pediatric radiography
    Robert J Staton
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 8300, USA
    Med Phys 33:3283-9. 2006
    ..An comprehensive set of SF(POD) values is presented in this article for application in pediatric radiography of newborn patients...
  6. ncbi An assessment of bone marrow and bone endosteum dosimetry methods for photon sources
    Choonik Lee
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 8300, USA
    Phys Med Biol 51:5391-407. 2006
    ....
  7. ncbi Organ and effective doses in newborns and infants undergoing voiding cystourethrograms (VCUG): a comparison of stylized and tomographic phantoms
    Frank D Pazik
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 8300, USA
    Med Phys 34:294-306. 2007
    ..These differences are due in part to a reduced ovary dose in the tomographic phantom for right posterior oblique (RPO) views when compared to those seen in the stylized phantom...
  8. ncbi Organ and effective doses in infants undergoing upper gastrointestinal (UGI) fluoroscopic examination
    Robert J Staton
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 8300, USA
    Med Phys 34:703-10. 2007
    ..The mean effective dose for newborn UGI examinations was not found to be statistically different from that seen in newborn VCUG examinations...
  9. ncbi Organ and effective doses in pediatric patients undergoing helical multislice computed tomography examination
    Choonik Lee
    Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 8300, USA
    Med Phys 34:1858-73. 2007
    ....