Parent Behavior and Child Adjustment Across Cultures

Summary

Principal Investigator: JENNIFER LANSFORD
Affiliation: Duke University Medical Center
Country: USA
Abstract: DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): This study addresses how parents'discipline strategies affect children's development. The first and second aims are to examine whether the association between harsh discipline and child adjustment is moderated by: 1) the normativeness of the discipline method as indicated by cultural acceptance of its use, and 2) the affective quality of the parent-child relationship. We hypothesize that under conditions of cultural normativeness and warmth within the parent-child relationship, there is a weaker association between harsh discipline and children's adjustment difficulties. The third aim is to examine whether the association between harsh discipline and children's adjustment difficulties is mediated by children's cognitive appraisals regarding the discipline. The way children interpret a discipline practice is hypothesized to explain, in part, the link between discipline and children's adjustment. As part of understanding children's interpretations of discipline practices, we will try to "unpack" culture into measurable contextual components and to understand specific characteristics of culture (e.g., beliefs, values) that affect parenting practices and children's interpretations of them. We will collect and analyze data in 8 countries (i.e., China, India, Italy, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, United States) and subgroups within these countries. Each country has been selected because of its potential to provide a unique contribution to understanding how parents'discipline behaviors affect children's adjustment. Structured interviews will be conducted with 100 children and their mothers and fathers in each cultural group. Longitudinal follow-up will occur 12 months and 24 months after the initial assessment. Analyses will be conducted through structural equation modeling and multilevel modeling in which measurement occasions are nested within families, which are nested within cultures. Findings regarding mechanisms through which parenting affects children's adjustment will have public health implications because of their potential to influence interventions designed to prevent adjustment problems, especially in maltreated and other high-risk groups. Understanding how parents'discipline practices relate to children's adjustment from multiple cultural perspectives has the potential to inform applications of developmental psychology in law, policy, and intervention.
Funding Period: ----------------2007 - ---------------2012-
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Corporal punishment of children in nine countries as a function of child gender and parent gender
    Jennifer E Lansford
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Int J Pediatr 2010:672780. 2010
  2. pmc Attitudes justifying domestic violence predict endorsement of corporal punishment and physical and psychological aggression towards children: a study in 25 low- and middle-income countries
    Jennifer E Lansford
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC Electronic address
    J Pediatr 164:1208-13. 2014
  3. pmc The association between parental warmth and control in thirteen cultural groups
    Kirby Deater-Deckard
    Department of Psychology, Virginia Tech, VA, USA
    J Fam Psychol 25:790-4. 2011
  4. pmc Parent discipline practices in an international sample: associations with child behaviors and moderation by perceived normativeness
    Elizabeth T Gershoff
    University of Texas at Austin, Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, 1 University Station A2700, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Child Dev 81:487-502. 2010

Scientific Experts

  • ELIZABETH T contact GERSHOFF
  • Jennifer E Lansford
  • Kirby Deater-Deckard
  • Marc H Bornstein
  • Kenneth A Dodge
  • Concetta Pastorelli
  • Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado
  • Laura Di Giunta
  • Sombat Tapanya
  • Dario Bacchini
  • Arnaldo Zelli
  • Anna Silvia Bombi
  • Paul Oburu
  • Emma Sorbring
  • Liane Peña Alampay
  • Lei Chang
  • Ann T Skinner
  • Diane L Putnick
  • Robert H Bradley
  • Suha M Al-Hassan
  • Patrick S Malone
  • Desmond K Runyan
  • Suha Al-Hassan

Detail Information

Publications21

  1. pmc Corporal punishment of children in nine countries as a function of child gender and parent gender
    Jennifer E Lansford
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
    Int J Pediatr 2010:672780. 2010
    ..Conclusion. This work establishes that the use of corporal punishment is widespread, and efforts to prevent corporal punishment from escalating into physical abuse should be commensurately widespread...
  2. pmc Attitudes justifying domestic violence predict endorsement of corporal punishment and physical and psychological aggression towards children: a study in 25 low- and middle-income countries
    Jennifer E Lansford
    Center for Child and Family Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC Electronic address
    J Pediatr 164:1208-13. 2014
    ....
  3. pmc The association between parental warmth and control in thirteen cultural groups
    Kirby Deater-Deckard
    Department of Psychology, Virginia Tech, VA, USA
    J Fam Psychol 25:790-4. 2011
    ..Children and parents completed questionnaires and interviews regarding mother and father control and warmth. Greater warmth was associated with more control, but this association varied widely between cultural groups...
  4. pmc Parent discipline practices in an international sample: associations with child behaviors and moderation by perceived normativeness
    Elizabeth T Gershoff
    University of Texas at Austin, Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, 1 University Station A2700, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Child Dev 81:487-502. 2010
    ..Some moderation of these associations was found for children's perceptions of normativeness...