Magneto-motive ultrasound imaging using molecular specific nanoparticles

Summary

Principal Investigator: STANISLAV EMELIANOV
Affiliation: University of Texas
Country: USA
Abstract: The incidence of malignant melanoma of the skin the most serious form of skin cancer is increasing faster than that of any other cancer in the United States, and this rising incidence is expected to continue for at least the next 20 years. The prognosis for patients with melanoma is determined by the histology of the primary tumor and by the presence and extent of metastatic disease. Accurate staging at diagnosis is important to assess the prognosis and to determine best therapeutic strategy. The physical examination of regional lymph nodes is often inaccurate. More definitive information about the status of the regional nodes can be obtained from elective lymph node dissection (ELND), lymphoscintigraphy with sentinel node biopsy (LSNB), or fine needle aspiration. However, there are several major drawbacks of these procedures. Although some sites of metastatic disease may be clinically apparent, imaging must be used to detect unsuspected metastases almost all patients who die from melanoma do so with disseminated disease. Imaging studies are, therefore, an important component of the evaluation of patients with both localized and advanced melanoma. However, current imaging techniques including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) and ultrasound imaging are ineffective in majority of asymptomatic patients with stage I or II disease. Therefore, there is an urgent and definite clinical need for an objective imaging technique that is widely available, is noninvasive and simple to perform, is safe, and can reliably detect and adequately diagnose early lymph node micro-metastases in real- time. The overall goal of our research program is to develop an in-vivo, minimally noninvasive, molecular specific imaging technology magneto-motive ultrasound (MMUS) imaging capable of immediate and accurate assessment of presence and extent of metastatic disease at all stages. In MMUS imaging, the targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are injected into the tissue and the ultrasound is used both to visualize the tissue and to accurately evaluate the internal tissue motion induced by the externally applied magnetic field. The central theme of the current application is threefold: to design and build a laboratory prototype of the magneto-motive ultrasound imaging system, to develop molecularly sensitive contrast agent for MMUS imaging system, and to initially test the developed MMUS imaging technology in tissue-mimicking phantoms, 3D cell tissue constructs and, finally, small animal cancer model ex-vivo, in vitro and in vivo. The skin is the largest organ in the body, and it is not surprising that cancer of the skin is the most common of all cancers. Melanoma a cancer that begins in skin cells called melanocytes is the most deadly skin cancer, accounting for 79% of skin cancer deaths. Melanoma is currently the sixth most common cancer in American men and the seventh most common in American women. The median age at diagnosis is between 45 and 55, although 25% of cases occur in individuals before age 40. It is the second most common cancer in women between the ages of 20 and 35, and the leading cause of cancer death in women ages 25 to 30. The overall goal of our research program is to develop an advanced, noninvasive (or minimally invasive), real- time imaging technique magneto-motive ultrasound (MMUS) imaging to assess sentinel lymph node metastases thus identifying the best therapeutic intervention including immediate therapy if necessary.
Funding Period: ----------------2008 - ---------------2012-
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc In vivo pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging using high-performance magnetoactive contrast nanoagents
    Mohammad Mehrmohammadi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA
    Nanoscale 5:11179-86. 2013
  2. pmc Ligand-mediated self-assembly of hybrid plasmonic and superparamagnetic nanostructures
    Ryan L Truby
    The Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C0800, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Langmuir 29:2465-70. 2013
  3. pmc Growth of textured thin Au coatings on iron oxide nanoparticles with near infrared absorbance
    L L Ma
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Nanotechnology 24:025606. 2013
  4. ncbi Pulsed magneto-acoustic imaging
    Mohammad Mehrmohammadi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2009:4771-4. 2009
  5. pmc Low viscosity highly concentrated injectable nonaqueous suspensions of lysozyme microparticles
    Maria A Miller
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Langmuir 26:1067-74. 2010
  6. pmc Assessment of shear modulus of tissue using ultrasound radiation force acting on a spherical acoustic inhomogeneity
    Andrei B Karpiouk
    Dept of Biomed Eng, Univ of Texas at Austin, TX, USA
    IEEE Trans Ultrason Ferroelectr Freq Control 56:2380-7. 2009
  7. ncbi Molecular therapeutic agents for noninvasive photoacoustic image-guided photothermal therapy
    Pratixa P Joshi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2009:4106-9. 2009
  8. doi Biomedical photoacoustics beyond thermal expansion using triggered nanodroplet vaporization for contrast-enhanced imaging
    Katheryne Wilson
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Nat Commun 3:618. 2012
  9. pmc Estimation of mechanical properties of a viscoelastic medium using a laser-induced microbubble interrogated by an acoustic radiation force
    Sangpil Yoon
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 1063, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 130:2241-8. 2011
  10. pmc Pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging to detect intracellular trafficking of magnetic nanoparticles
    Mohammad Mehrmohammadi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA
    Nanotechnology 22:415105. 2011

Scientific Experts

  • Min Qu
  • Pratixa P Joshi
  • Mohammad Mehrmohammadi
  • Stanislav Y Emelianov
  • Keith P Johnston
  • Li Leo Ma
  • Andrei B Karpiouk
  • Ryan L Truby
  • Srivalleesha Mallidi
  • Salavat R Aglyamov
  • Jasmine M Tam
  • L L Ma
  • K Y Yoon
  • Katheryne Wilson
  • K P Johnston
  • STANISLAV EMELIANOV
  • Sangpil Yoon
  • M Mehrmohammadi
  • Konstantin V Sokolov
  • Junghwan Oh
  • Maria A Miller
  • Konstantin Sokolov
  • Justina O Tam
  • Davis R Ingram
  • B W Willsey
  • J O Tam
  • M D Feldman
  • A U Borwankar
  • Pieter Kruizinga
  • Kimberly A Homan
  • Tae Hyun Shin
  • T E Milner
  • Jinwoo Cheon
  • Jae Hyun Lee
  • K V Sokolov
  • Kimberly Homan
  • Geoffrey P Luke
  • Brian W Willsey
  • Li L Ma
  • Seungsoo Kim
  • S Y Emelianov
  • Rajagopal Ramesh
  • Dwight K Romanovicz
  • Daniel Rigdon
  • Joshua D Engstrom
  • Robin Nguyen
  • Avinash K Murthy
  • Baltej S Ludher
  • Vidia Paramita
  • Joseph W Villard
  • Eugenia A Zabolotskaya
  • James T Jenkins
  • Geoffrey D Clarke
  • Bysani Chandrasekar
  • Timothy A Larson
  • Kiran K Cheruku
  • Marc D Feldman
  • Thomas E Milner
  • Yury A Ilinskii
  • Tianyi Wang
  • Reto Asmis
  • Amit S Paranjape

Detail Information

Publications21

  1. pmc In vivo pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging using high-performance magnetoactive contrast nanoagents
    Mohammad Mehrmohammadi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA
    Nanoscale 5:11179-86. 2013
    ..In this study, we demonstrate the capability of pMMUS imaging to identify the presence and distribution of zinc-doped iron oxide nanoparticles in live nude mice bearing A431 (human epithelial carcinoma) xenograft tumors. ..
  2. pmc Ligand-mediated self-assembly of hybrid plasmonic and superparamagnetic nanostructures
    Ryan L Truby
    The Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C0800, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Langmuir 29:2465-70. 2013
    ..With tunable near-infrared absorption peaks and a sufficient number of bound SPIONs, the self-assembled hybrid nanostructures are suitable for biomedical imaging and therapy applications...
  3. pmc Growth of textured thin Au coatings on iron oxide nanoparticles with near infrared absorbance
    L L Ma
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Nanotechnology 24:025606. 2013
    ....
  4. ncbi Pulsed magneto-acoustic imaging
    Mohammad Mehrmohammadi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2009:4771-4. 2009
    ..Furthermore, PMA imaging could become an imaging tool capable of visualizing the cellular and molecular composition of deep-lying structures...
  5. pmc Low viscosity highly concentrated injectable nonaqueous suspensions of lysozyme microparticles
    Maria A Miller
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Langmuir 26:1067-74. 2010
    ....
  6. pmc Assessment of shear modulus of tissue using ultrasound radiation force acting on a spherical acoustic inhomogeneity
    Andrei B Karpiouk
    Dept of Biomed Eng, Univ of Texas at Austin, TX, USA
    IEEE Trans Ultrason Ferroelectr Freq Control 56:2380-7. 2009
    ..The results of this study indicate that there is a strong correlation between the shear modulus of a medium and spatio-temporal characteristics of the motion of the rigid sphere embedded in this medium...
  7. ncbi Molecular therapeutic agents for noninvasive photoacoustic image-guided photothermal therapy
    Pratixa P Joshi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2009:4106-9. 2009
    ....
  8. doi Biomedical photoacoustics beyond thermal expansion using triggered nanodroplet vaporization for contrast-enhanced imaging
    Katheryne Wilson
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Nat Commun 3:618. 2012
    ..We demonstrate in phantom and animal studies that photoacoustic nanodroplets act as dual-contrast agents for both photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging through optically triggered vaporization...
  9. pmc Estimation of mechanical properties of a viscoelastic medium using a laser-induced microbubble interrogated by an acoustic radiation force
    Sangpil Yoon
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 1063, USA
    J Acoust Soc Am 130:2241-8. 2011
    ..8 to 13 kPa. The results indicate good agreement between methods. Thus, the proposed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of a viscoelastic medium...
  10. pmc Pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging to detect intracellular trafficking of magnetic nanoparticles
    Mohammad Mehrmohammadi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA
    Nanotechnology 22:415105. 2011
    ..The results of our study suggest that pMMUS imaging can not only detect the presence of magnetic nanoparticles but also provides information about their intracellular accumulation non-invasively and in real-time...
  11. pmc Selective targeting of antibody conjugated multifunctional nanoclusters (nanoroses) to epidermal growth factor receptors in cancer cells
    Li Leo Ma
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Langmuir 27:7681-90. 2011
    ....
  12. pmc Pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging using ultrasmall magnetic nanoprobes
    Mohammad Mehrmohammadi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Mol Imaging 10:102-10. 2011
    ..Therefore, pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging could become an imaging tool capable of detecting magnetic nanoparticles and characterizing the cellular and molecular composition of deep-lying structures...
  13. ncbi Combined photoacoustic and magneto-acoustic imaging
    Min Qu
    Ultrasound Imaging and Therapeutics Research Laboratory in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 0238, USA
    Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2009:4763-6. 2009
    ..Therefore, the developed imaging technique can be used in wide range of biomedical and clinical application...
  14. pmc Photoacoustic imaging in cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment guidance
    Srivalleesha Mallidi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Trends Biotechnol 29:213-21. 2011
    ..This review examines the role of photoacoustics and photoacoustic-augmented imaging techniques in comprehensive cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment guidance...
  15. pmc Enhanced pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging using superparamagnetic nanoclusters
    M Mehrmohammadi
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
    Nanotechnology 22:045502. 2011
    ..e. the same magnetic field produced larger magnetically induced displacement. Therefore, our study demonstrates that clusters of superparamagnetic nanoparticles result in pMMUS images with higher contrast and SNR...
  16. pmc Kinetic assembly of near-IR-active gold nanoclusters using weakly adsorbing polymers to control the size
    Jasmine M Tam
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    Langmuir 26:8988-99. 2010
    ..The generality of this kinetic assembly platform is demonstrated for gold nanoparticles with a range of surface charges from highly negative to neutral with the two different polymers...
  17. pmc Small multifunctional nanoclusters (nanoroses) for targeted cellular imaging and therapy
    Li Leo Ma
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA
    ACS Nano 3:2686-96. 2009
    ..Small nanoclusters with optical, magnetic, and therapeutic functionality, designed by assembly of nanoparticle building blocks, offer broad opportunities for targeted cellular imaging, therapy, and combined imaging and therapy...