Perception and Modulation of Visceral Sensation

Summary

Principal Investigator: Emeran Mayer
Affiliation: University of California
Country: USA
Abstract: The long-term goal of the proposed research is to better understand the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), in the hope to develop more effective treatments. Despite the high prevalence and high human and economic costs of IBS, the disorder is poorly understood, and existing treatment options remain unsatisfactory. IBS is a disorder of altered brain-gut interactions, characterized by enhanced stress-sensitivity, frequent overlap with other disorders of chronic pain and discomfort, familial predisposition, and greater prevalence in women. Both peripheral and central abnormalities have been demonstrated. Centrally, it is characterized by enhanced perception of gut stimuli resulting in abdominal pain and discomfort. Altered bowel habits may be related to altered central and/or peripheral neural responses regulating intestinal motility and secretion. The current proposal uses cutting edge brain imaging, genetic and mathematical techniques to characterize distinct brain networks (intermediate brain phenotypes) concerned with the processing of visceral afferent information, with the modulation of visceral pain perception, and with determining arousal and stress sensitivity, and possible associations of these intermediate phenotypes with polymorphisms in several candidate genes. This goal will be accomplished by studying 300 Caucasian subjects (200 IBS patients, 100 healthy controls, 50% women) in 3 Specific Aims: In Aim A, by using fMRI combined with advanced analysis techniques, we will characterize alterations in the activity and connectivity of distinct brain networks concerned with pain processing, pain modulation, and arousal/emotional regulation in patients and controls. We will look for possible associations between functional network responses and selected candidate gene polymorphisms, for gene-gene, gene-early life event, and gene-sex interactions in shaping network responses. In Aim B, we will analyze all brain structural MRI images from Aim A using voxel-based morphometry for structural differences between IBS patients and controls, and search for possible associations of such regional brain volume changes and candidate genes. In Aim C, we will study perceptual and autonomic responses to somatic pain stimuli, and correlate these (as well as visceral pain responses obtained in Aim A) with intermediate brain phenotypes, as well as with genetic polymorphisms. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: A better understanding of brain circuits which underlie predominant symptoms, and associated genetic traits will enhance our understanding of IBS pathophysiology, and greatly facilitate the development of better treatments for these common GI disorders.
Funding Period: ----------------1996 - ---------------2013-
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Brain-gut microbiome interactions and functional bowel disorders
    Emeran A Mayer
    Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California Electronic address
    Gastroenterology 146:1500-12. 2014
  2. pmc Impaired emotional learning and involvement of the corticotropin-releasing factor signaling system in patients with irritable bowel syndrome
    Jennifer S Labus
    Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for the Neurobiology of Stress, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California Department of Psychiatry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
    Gastroenterology 145:1253-61.e1-3. 2013
  3. pmc Functional brain activation during retrieval of visceral pain-conditioned passive avoidance in the rat
    Zhuo Wang
    Center for the Neurobiology of Stress, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Pain 152:2746-56. 2011
  4. pmc Evidence for alterations in central noradrenergic signaling in irritable bowel syndrome
    Steven Berman
    Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Neuroimage 63:1854-63. 2012
  5. pmc Consumption of fermented milk product with probiotic modulates brain activity
    Kirsten Tillisch
    Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    Gastroenterology 144:1394-401, 1401.e1-4. 2013
  6. pmc Effect of hypnotherapy and educational intervention on brain response to visceral stimulus in the irritable bowel syndrome
    M B O Lowén
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Gastroenterology, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization CMIV, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden
    Aliment Pharmacol Ther 37:1184-97. 2013
  7. pmc Diffusion tensor imaging detects microstructural reorganization in the brain associated with chronic irritable bowel syndrome
    Benjamin M Ellingson
    Department of Radiological Science, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA
    Pain 154:1528-41. 2013
  8. pmc Sex differences in emotion-related cognitive processes in irritable bowel syndrome and healthy control subjects
    Jennifer S Labus
    Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Pain and Interoception Network PAIN Repository, Los Angeles, CA, USA Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Pain 154:2088-99. 2013
  9. pmc Patients with chronic visceral pain show sex-related alterations in intrinsic oscillations of the resting brain
    Jui Yang Hong
    Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    J Neurosci 33:11994-2002. 2013
  10. pmc Sex-related differences of cortical thickness in patients with chronic abdominal pain
    Zhiguo Jiang
    Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Pain and Interoception Network PAIN Repository, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America Human Performance and Engineering Laboratory, Kessler Foundation Research Center, West Orange, New Jersey, United States of America Department of Biomedical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e73932. 2013

Scientific Experts

  • Emeran Mayer
  • L Chang
  • S Bradesi
  • Lisa A Kilpatrick
  • Jennifer S Labus
  • Kirsten Tillisch
  • Bruce D Naliboff
  • Jean Stains
  • Jui Yang Hong
  • Zhiguo Jiang
  • Arpana Gupta
  • Brandall Suyenobu
  • Catherine S Hubbard
  • Cody Ashe-McNalley
  • Bahar Ebrat
  • Jennifer Labus
  • Bruce Naliboff
  • Joshua Bueller
  • Daniel P Holschneider
  • J S Labus
  • Yonggang Shi
  • Steven M Berman
  • Suzanne Smith
  • Steven Berman
  • Joshua A Bueller
  • Arthur W Toga
  • Alen Zamanyan
  • Ivo D Dinov
  • Nuwanthi Heendeniya
  • Benjamin M Ellingson
  • Helmut Grasberger
  • M B O Lowén
  • Wendy Shih
  • Angela P Presson
  • George E Dukes
  • Johanna M Jarcho
  • Mats B O Larsson
  • Kara Bradford
  • Dennis L Kelleher
  • Theodore R Sadler
  • Ariana Anderson
  • Zhuo Wang
  • Jean Michel I Maarek
  • Charalabos Pothoulakis
  • Johanna Jarcho
  • Eduardo P Vianna
  • Gordon Ohning
  • David A Seminowicz
  • Yuri A Saito
  • Sang H Rhee
  • Yehuda Ringel
  • B Suyenobu
  • J M Jarcho
  • Douglas A Drossman
  • F Azpiroz
  • Michael Camilleri
  • J Douglas Bremner
  • Kim Ruby
  • Sam Hobel
  • Shantanu Joshi
  • Paul M Thompson
  • Boris A Gutman
  • Suzanne R Smith
  • Ivo Dinov
  • Sophie Legrain-Raspaud
  • Michelle Chen
  • Beatrice Trotin
  • Iordanis Karagiannides
  • B Naliboff
  • J Labus
  • Cody Ashe-McNally
  • M Sjoberg
  • Juanita L Merchant
  • Rodney D Newberry
  • Denis Guyonnet
  • M Engstrom
  • Kristen Coveleskie
  • P Lundberg
  • Robert J Harris
  • Michael Fanselow
  • Natasha Feier
  • M Strom
  • S A Walter
  • Gregory S Sayuk
  • K Tillisch
  • Heng Wong
  • Peter Lundberg
  • Maria Engström
  • A D Craig
  • Magnus Ström

Detail Information

Publications51

  1. pmc Brain-gut microbiome interactions and functional bowel disorders
    Emeran A Mayer
    Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California Electronic address
    Gastroenterology 146:1500-12. 2014
    ..Studies are needed to better characterize alterations to the intestinal microbiome in large cohorts of well-phenotyped patients, and to correlate intestinal metabolites with specific abnormalities in gut-brain interactions...
  2. pmc Impaired emotional learning and involvement of the corticotropin-releasing factor signaling system in patients with irritable bowel syndrome
    Jennifer S Labus
    Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for the Neurobiology of Stress, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California Department of Psychiatry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
    Gastroenterology 145:1253-61.e1-3. 2013
    ....
  3. pmc Functional brain activation during retrieval of visceral pain-conditioned passive avoidance in the rat
    Zhuo Wang
    Center for the Neurobiology of Stress, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Pain 152:2746-56. 2011
    ....
  4. pmc Evidence for alterations in central noradrenergic signaling in irritable bowel syndrome
    Steven Berman
    Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Neuroimage 63:1854-63. 2012
    ..Alterations in noradrenergic (NE) signaling have been implicated in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and adrenergic receptors are potential treatment targets...
  5. pmc Consumption of fermented milk product with probiotic modulates brain activity
    Kirsten Tillisch
    Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    Gastroenterology 144:1394-401, 1401.e1-4. 2013
    ..We investigated whether consumption of a fermented milk product with probiotic (FMPP) for 4 weeks by healthy women altered brain intrinsic connectivity or responses to emotional attention tasks...
  6. pmc Effect of hypnotherapy and educational intervention on brain response to visceral stimulus in the irritable bowel syndrome
    M B O Lowén
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Gastroenterology, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization CMIV, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden
    Aliment Pharmacol Ther 37:1184-97. 2013
    ..Gut-directed hypnotherapy can reduce IBS symptoms, but the mechanisms underlying this therapeutic effect remain unknown...
  7. pmc Diffusion tensor imaging detects microstructural reorganization in the brain associated with chronic irritable bowel syndrome
    Benjamin M Ellingson
    Department of Radiological Science, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA
    Pain 154:1528-41. 2013
    ....
  8. pmc Sex differences in emotion-related cognitive processes in irritable bowel syndrome and healthy control subjects
    Jennifer S Labus
    Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Pain and Interoception Network PAIN Repository, Los Angeles, CA, USA Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Pain 154:2088-99. 2013
    ....
  9. pmc Patients with chronic visceral pain show sex-related alterations in intrinsic oscillations of the resting brain
    Jui Yang Hong
    Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    J Neurosci 33:11994-2002. 2013
    ..g., abdominal discomfort). These findings provide the first insight into sex-related differences in IBS subjects compared with HCs using resting-state fMRI. ..
  10. pmc Sex-related differences of cortical thickness in patients with chronic abdominal pain
    Zhiguo Jiang
    Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Pain and Interoception Network PAIN Repository, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America Human Performance and Engineering Laboratory, Kessler Foundation Research Center, West Orange, New Jersey, United States of America Department of Biomedical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 8:e73932. 2013
    ..We aimed to characterize regional changes in cortical thickness (CT) in a large number of well phenotyped IBS patients, taking into account the role of sex related differences...
  11. pmc Identification of a functional TPH1 polymorphism associated with irritable bowel syndrome bowel habit subtypes
    Helmut Grasberger
    Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
    Am J Gastroenterol 108:1766-74. 2013
    ..In this study, we assessed the only common TPH1 proximal promoter variant (-347C/A; rs7130929) and its association with bowel habit predominance in IBS...
  12. pmc Irritable bowel syndrome in female patients is associated with alterations in structural brain networks
    Jennifer S Labus
    Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Pain and Interoception Network PAIN, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA Electronic address
    Pain 155:137-49. 2014
    ..Overall, evidence for central alterations in patients with IBS was found in the form of regional GM volume differences and altered global and regional properties of brain volumetric networks. ..
  13. pmc Regional neuroplastic brain changes in patients with chronic inflammatory and non-inflammatory visceral pain
    Jui Yang Hong
    Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America Department of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America Division of Digestive Diseases, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America Department of Bioengineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America
    PLoS ONE 9:e84564. 2014
    ..The findings suggest that the mechanisms underlying the observed gray matter changes in UC subjects represent a consequence of peripheral inflammation, while in IBS subjects central mechanisms may play a primary role. ..
  14. pmc Influence of sucrose ingestion on brainstem and hypothalamic intrinsic oscillations in lean and obese women
    Lisa A Kilpatrick
    Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California Department of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, University of California, Los Angeles, California Electronic address
    Gastroenterology 146:1212-21. 2014
    ....
  15. pmc Brain networks underlying perceptual habituation to repeated aversive visceral stimuli in patients with irritable bowel syndrome
    Jennifer S Labus
    Center for Neurobiology of Stress, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    Neuroimage 47:952-60. 2009
    ....
  16. ncbi Effect of sex on perception of rectosigmoid stimuli in irritable bowel syndrome
    Lin Chang
    Center for Neurovisceral Sciences and Women s Health, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, and Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, California 90073, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 291:R277-84. 2006
    ..01), while men did not. Sex significantly influences perceptual sensitivity to rectosigmoid distension. Women show greater perceptual responses to this paradigm...
  17. pmc Neural and psychological predictors of treatment response in irritable bowel syndrome patients with a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist: a pilot study
    J M Jarcho
    UCLA Center for Neurovisceral Sciences and Women s Health, Los Angeles, CA 90073, USA
    Aliment Pharmacol Ther 28:344-52. 2008
    ..Factors predicting treatment responsiveness are not known, although we have demonstrated that symptom improvement with the 5-HT3R antagonist alosetron is correlated with reduced amygdala activity...
  18. pmc Sex differences in brain activity during aversive visceral stimulation and its expectation in patients with chronic abdominal pain: a network analysis
    J S Labus
    Center for Neurobiology of Stress, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, USA
    Neuroimage 41:1032-43. 2008
    ....
  19. pmc Clinical practice. Irritable bowel syndrome
    Emeran A Mayer
    Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 6949, USA
    N Engl J Med 358:1692-9. 2008
  20. doi Effect of abuse history on pain reports and brain responses to aversive visceral stimulation: an FMRI study
    Yehuda Ringel
    UNC Center for Functional GI and Motility Disorders, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
    Gastroenterology 134:396-404. 2008
    ..These effects may be mediated by enhanced responses to aversive visceral stimuli. We investigated the effects of IBS and abuse history on pain reporting and brain activation in response to rectal distentions...
  21. doi Reduced brainstem inhibition during anticipated pelvic visceral pain correlates with enhanced brain response to the visceral stimulus in women with irritable bowel syndrome
    Steven M Berman
    Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles Center for Neurovisceral Sciences and Women s Health, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, 90073, USA
    J Neurosci 28:349-59. 2008
    ....
  22. pmc Novel therapeutic approaches in IBS
    Sylvie Bradesi
    UCLA Center for Neurovisceral Sciences and Women s Health, and Departments of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA
    Curr Opin Pharmacol 7:598-604. 2007
    ..Recent new evidence for a possible role of altered microflora and altered host microbial interactions may provide new treatment targets in the future...
  23. pmc Psychometric properties of the Early Trauma Inventory-Self Report
    J Douglas Bremner
    Department of Psychiatry, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30306, USA
    J Nerv Ment Dis 195:211-8. 2007
    ..These findings suggest that the ETI-SR is a valid measure of early trauma, and suggest future directions for a shortened version of the ETI-SR that could be more easily incorporated into clinical research studies and practice settings...
  24. ncbi Primary endpoints for irritable bowel syndrome trials: a review of performance of endpoints
    Michael Camilleri
    CENTER Program, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 5:534-40. 2007
    ....
  25. ncbi Mechanisms of hypersensitivity in IBS and functional disorders
    F Azpiroz
    Digestive System Research Unit, University Hospital Vall d Hebron, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
    Neurogastroenterol Motil 19:62-88. 2007
    ....
  26. ncbi Neuroimaging of the brain-gut axis: from basic understanding to treatment of functional GI disorders
    Emeran A Mayer
    Center for Neurovisceral Sciences and Women s Health, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90073, USA
    Gastroenterology 131:1925-42. 2006
  27. ncbi Longitudinal change in perceptual and brain activation response to visceral stimuli in irritable bowel syndrome patients
    Bruce D Naliboff
    Center for Neurovisceral Sciences and Women s Health, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Gastroenterology 131:352-65. 2006
    ..Repeated stimulus exposure leads to decreased salience of threat and reduction of hypervigilance. We sought to evaluate hypervigilance in IBS visceral hypersensitivity and associated brain activity...
  28. ncbi Sex differences in regional brain response to aversive pelvic visceral stimuli
    Steven M Berman
    University of California, Los Angeles UCLA, Center for Neurovisceral Sciences and Women s Health, Department of Medicine, and Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, CA 90073, USA
    Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 291:R268-76. 2006
    ..Greater familiarity of females with physiological pelvic visceral discomfort may have enhanced brain systems that dampen arousal networks during lower levels of discomfort...
  29. pmc Impact of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction training on intrinsic brain connectivity
    Lisa A Kilpatrick
    David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Neuroimage 56:290-8. 2011
    ....
  30. pmc Association between early adverse life events and irritable bowel syndrome
    Kara Bradford
    Oppenheimer Family Center of Neurobiology of Stress, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 7378, USA
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 10:385-90.e1-3. 2012
    ..We investigated whether different types of EALs, before age 18 years, are more prevalent among patients with IBS, and the effects of sex and nongastrointestinal symptoms on the relationship between EALs and IBS...
  31. pmc Pain, affective symptoms, and cognitive deficits in patients with cerebral dopamine dysfunction
    Johanna M Jarcho
    National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
    Pain 153:744-54. 2012
    ..The present review focuses on this relationship, and discusses clinical and potential therapeutic implications for both patients with dopamine-related disorders and those with chronic pain syndromes...
  32. pmc Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in irritable bowel syndrome
    L Chang
    Center for Neurobiology of Stress, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90073, USA
    Neurogastroenterol Motil 21:149-59. 2009
    ..05). Although dysregulations in stress-responsive systems such as the HPA axis and mucosal immune function are demonstrated in IBS, they do not appear to have a primary role in modulating IBS severity and abdominal pain...
  33. pmc Serum and colonic mucosal immune markers in irritable bowel syndrome
    Lin Chang
    Center for Neurobiology of Stress, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 7378, USA
    Am J Gastroenterol 107:262-72. 2012
    ....
  34. pmc Brain responses to visceral stimuli reflect visceral sensitivity thresholds in patients with irritable bowel syndrome
    Mats B O Larsson
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Gastroenterology, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden
    Gastroenterology 142:463-472.e3. 2012
    ..We investigated the brain mechanisms of these perceptual differences...
  35. pmc Brain imaging approaches to the study of functional GI disorders: a Rome working team report
    E A Mayer
    Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Department of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90073, USA
    Neurogastroenterol Motil 21:579-96. 2009
    ..The article concludes with a critical assessment of published studies, and with recommendations for improved study paradigms and analysis strategies...
  36. pmc Genetic approaches to functional gastrointestinal disorders
    Yuri A Saito
    C E N T E R, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
    Gastroenterology 138:1276-85. 2010
    ....
  37. pmc Regional gray matter density changes in brains of patients with irritable bowel syndrome
    David A Seminowicz
    Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Gastroenterology 139:48-57.e2. 2010
    ..Several studies have examined structural brain changes associated with chronic pain syndromes, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but study sample sizes have been small and heterogeneous...
  38. pmc Common component classification: what can we learn from machine learning?
    Ariana Anderson
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
    Neuroimage 56:517-24. 2011
    ..Collectively this work identifies challenges specific to fMRI classification and methods affecting the stability of models...
  39. pmc Quantitative meta-analysis identifies brain regions activated during rectal distension in irritable bowel syndrome
    Kirsten Tillisch
    Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    Gastroenterology 140:91-100. 2011
    ..We aimed to identify brain regions consistently activated by supraliminal rectal stimulation in IBS patients and healthy subjects (controls) by performing a quantitative meta-analysis of published studies...
  40. pmc The brain-gut axis in abdominal pain syndromes
    Emeran A Mayer
    Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Annu Rev Med 62:381-96. 2011
    ....
  41. pmc Antenatal maternal stress alters functional brain responses in adult offspring during conditioned fear
    Theodore R Sadler
    Department of Pathology, USC Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
    Brain Res 1385:163-74. 2011
    ..Dysregulation of corticolimbic circuits may represent risk factors in the future development of anxiety disorders and associated alterations in emotional regulation...
  42. pmc The role of experimental models in developing new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome
    Daniel P Holschneider
    VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, LA, CA, USA
    Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol 5:43-57. 2011
    ..A reverse translational approach is proposed, which is based on identification and characterization of brain endophenotypes in patients, followed by translation of these endophenotypes for pharmacological studies in rodent models...
  43. pmc Role of spinal microglia in visceral hyperalgesia and NK1R up-regulation in a rat model of chronic stress
    Sylvie Bradesi
    Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90073, USA
    Gastroenterology 136:1339-48, e1-2. 2009
    ..Chronic psychological stress is associated with visceral hyperalgesia and increased expression of spinal NK1 receptors (NK1Rs). We aimed to identify the role of spinal microglia in this process...
  44. pmc Acute tryptophan depletion alters the effective connectivity of emotional arousal circuitry during visceral stimuli in healthy women
    J S Labus
    Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Department of Medicine, Physiology and Psychiatry, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA
    Gut 60:1196-203. 2011
    ....
  45. pmc The HTR3A polymorphism c. -42C>T is associated with amygdala responsiveness in patients with irritable bowel syndrome
    Lisa A Kilpatrick
    Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    Gastroenterology 140:1943-51. 2011
    ..We evaluated the influence of this single nucleotide polymorphism on amygdala reactivity to emotional faces and nonemotional stimuli in female patients with IBS and controls...
  46. pmc Modulation of nociceptive and acoustic startle responses to an unpredictable threat in men and women
    Catherine S Hubbard
    Center for the Neurobiology of Stress, University of California at Los Angeles UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 7378, USA
    Pain 152:1632-40. 2011
    ..Females, compared to males, showed greater nociceptive responding and pain modulation when exposed to an unpredictable threatening context, whereas affect-driven ASR responses showed no such sex differentiation...
  47. pmc Gut feelings: the emerging biology of gut-brain communication
    Emeran A Mayer
    Center for Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, CHS 47 122 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, California 90095 7378, USA
    Nat Rev Neurosci 12:453-66. 2011
    ..Moreover, disturbances of this system have been implicated in a wide range of disorders, including functional and inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders, obesity and eating disorders...
  48. pmc Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 antagonist alters regional activation and effective connectivity in an emotional-arousal circuit during expectation of abdominal pain
    Catherine S Hubbard
    Center for the Neurobiology of Stress and Departments of Medicine, Physiology, and Psychiatry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
    J Neurosci 31:12491-500. 2011
    ..The unique state anxiety effects observed suggest a potential pathway for therapeutic benefit of CRF(1) receptor antagonism for patients with stress-sensitive disorders...
  49. pmc Principles and clinical implications of the brain-gut-enteric microbiota axis
    Sang H Rhee
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine, CA, USA
    Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol 6:306-14. 2009
    ....